Kids.gov

Website review by
Erin Brereton, Common Sense Media
Kids.gov Website Poster Image
Educational hub is a solid resource for learning.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 7+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this website.

Educational Value

Kids can learn about art, exercise and healthy living, government, health and safety, history, jobs, math, money, music, online safety, reading and writing, science, and social studies in this safe online space. The actual content consists mainly of links that direct kids to other websites. Many offer games and interesting content, but lessons are handled differently on each site. More interactive activities and personalized content would strengthen this educational site.

Positive Messages

Some sites that Kids.gov links to encourage positive social behavior -- such as stopping cyberbullying.

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

Kids.gov doesn't have any ads; but some of the sites it links to do.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that the site is essentially a portal that offers links to dozens of sites on topics like science, art, and computers. Although some of the sites that are linked to are sponsored or regulated by the government, many aren't. Some are owned by private companies, like the Discovery Channel, or not-for-profit organizations, like the San Diego Zoo, and can contain ads. But overall, the content on this site and partner sites is pretty clean.

User Reviews

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Kid, 9 years old January 5, 2011

What's it about?

KIDS.GOV links to government agencies and other sites that cover topics such as careers, U.S. presidents, the art of video games, and saving money. Links are split into three groups for different audiences: grades K-5, grades 6-8, and educators. The site itself isn't too dynamic -- kids will likely spend more time on the linked-to sites than they will on Kids.gov. However, the site is well-organized, and most of the sites it links to were created specifically for grade school-aged children, making Kids.gov a valuable, safe resource.

Is it any good?

Kids.gov is well-organized -- the navigation is the same in the parent and teacher, teen, and younger kids' section. The sites that Kids.gov links to are designed and written for kids, and many feature bright colors, games, and other kid-friendly elements. Some sites focus on health, like the Center for Disease Control's BAM! Body and Mind site; others offer fun games and a  message, including career information and online safety tips.

The site can serve as a resource to help parents and teachers easily find safe, informative sites for kids to learn about a number of subjects. Teachers may also benefit from the site's classroom material recommendations. But kids may tire quickly of the basic Kids.gov format: Since the site is essentially comprised of lists of links, they're constantly being pushed away from the main site -- and may not navigate their way back to find out more.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about online safety. Why should you ask a parent before ever entering any information about yourself on a site? For tips on protecting kids' privacy online, check out our guide.

  • What information is OK to give out on websites? If they ask you to enter your name, should you enter your real name?

  • Kids.gov offers dozens of resources to make learning fun. How else can you help your child get excited about new educational topics?

Website details

For kids who love learning

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