pbskids.org/newsflashfive

Website review by
Lucy Maher, Common Sense Media
pbskids.org/newsflashfive Website Poster Image

Product no longer available

Kid-centric news site delivers the facts fairly.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 13+
Based on 5 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this website.

Positive Messages
Violence & Scariness

The war in Iraq is covered but there is no gratuitous violence.

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this site is run by the folks at Thirteen/WNET NY (a public television station in New York City), and funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. It delivers fair, balanced news stories on topics from weather and arts to technology and sports in a format parents will find safe for their kids and kids will find entertaining.

User Reviews

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  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 12 years old July 25, 2011

Update

Update: News Flash Five and Beeswax are GONE! Please remove sites that are gone
Kid, 10 years old March 29, 2010
hate it

What's it about?

Log on to PBSKIDS.ORG/NEWSFLASHFIVE and you'll find a virtual world where cartoon anchors read the week's news and kids from across the country file local news stories.

The site, a Public Broadcasting Service property, engages young users by posting news they'll find interesting in a kid-accessible format. The site is \"hosted\" by a diverse group of cartoon kids who sit at an anchor desk much like Katie Couric or Brian Williams. Kid-appropriate news stories are posted (during the week of April 4, 2007, the top story was San Francisco's ban on plastic bags), and there are dedicated areas to national news, world news, sports, weather, and arts and technology.

Is it any good?

The site, though kid-friendly, doesn't shy away from hard-hitting stories. It covered the detaining of British sailors in Iran and how food ads target young kids. What's more, kids can learn how to find and file their own news stories. They can use a tutorial to write their own piece (and possibly have it be featured on the site) or "get the scoop" by going through an interactive investigative scenario.

One thing this site is missing is it's ability to retain users. It would be great to see community boards where kids could discuss current events with other kids, or quizzes to test their news knowledge.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about world events and current affairs. Why are people fighting in Iraq? How do weather patterns affect different parts of the world? What are your favorite sports stars up to? What national news story is the most interesting to you and why?

Website details

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