WWE

TV review by
Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media
WWE TV Poster Image
YouTube channel puts wrestling videos at fans' fingertips.

Parents say

age 3+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 14+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The wrestlers put on a good show for the fans, and doing what they do without inflicting serious harm (most of the time, that is) does take some skill. But it's violent and presents itself as reality when it's not, which might be confusing to some viewers. Body differences (dwarfism, for instance) are often shown as spectacle.

 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Often the wrestlers continue pounding on an opponent even after he/she is clearly defeated, and they revel in their victory without visible concern for the loser. Fans boo contenders they don't like and cheer their defeat.

 

Violence

Not only do the WWE wrestlers wrestle in the traditional sense, they also use folding chairs and other props to hit each other. Wrestling moves include body slamming, strangle holds, and contorting arms and legs into painful positions. Even though it's an act, it's made to look very real, and the victims appear in great physical distress.

 

Sex

Mention of body parts like testicles. Some innuendo and references to sexual encounters, mostly in interviews. Women often wear tight outfits that reveal their breasts and curves, and some men wear spandex shorts or undies.

Language

Commonly "hell" and "ass."

 

Consumerism

This channel promotes the WWE and its entertainment value through highlight reels, behind-the-scenes clips, and full match replays.

 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that WWE is a YouTube channel devoted to highlights and matches from the entertainment franchise's lengthy history. Some videos are edited to meet certain themes, such as memorable entrances, surprising unmaskings, and heartfelt moments. Others present clips from interviews with wrestlers, and still others are replays of full-length matches. WWE content, while choreographed, is made to seem real and organic, so the wrestling often evolves into the actors pushing, jumping on, and hitting each other with objects like folding chairs. Language like "ass" and "hell" is common, and both male and female wrestlers wear clingy, revealing costumes. We recommend parent co-viewing of YouTube content for kids under 13. Please note: Our reviewers watch between 1 and 2 hours of content to determine the general appropriateness of each YouTube channel. Some channels contain more variety within their content than others; we do our best to capture the channel’s overall subject and tone to help parents make the best choice for their family.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bynewv n. April 12, 2018

Ronda and Bobby Lashley need a push NOW!

John Cena and Roman Reigns are the main stars that tons of people hate and are sick of. Vince needs to retire and WWE creative seriously needs to come up with b... Continue reading
Grandparent of a 8 year old Written byMicrosoftDad April 18, 2018
This is the creator of goo dreads and i think Bobby and Ronda need to calm down. CALM DOWN. NOW. CALM DOWN.CALM DOWN. NOW. CALM DOWN.CALM DOWN. NOW. CALM DOW...

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What's the story?

WWE is a collection of funny moments, highlight reels, interviews, and full matches from World Wrestling Entertainment. With videos ranging in length from a minute or two to more than an hour, the channel caters to WWE fans' desires to revisit favorite moments from current and classic matchups from several of the franchise's TV series through the past few decades.

Is it any good?

This archival compendium of memorable WWE moments is sure to thrill fans. It's exceedingly simple to dial up just about anything you want: favorite wrestlers, memorable matchups, action from a particular year, and so on. If you're not sure what you want to watch, browsing the channel prompts lots of suggestions, from funny mishaps to emotional moments in the ring.

If you've watched WWE matches, the fact that it's (spoiler alert!) at least partly scripted and choreographed won't come as a surprise. To younger viewers without that knowledge, though, it all looks very real -- the animosity between competitors, the lack of regard for the rules of wrestling, and especially the pain the actors show -- and will require some explanation.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about WWE's staged competition style. Does the fact that the matches are choreographed detract from the overall entertainment value of the channel's content? What do you think accounts for the WWE's longstanding fan approval?

  • Is it obvious to you that the fighting that goes on in these matches is mostly fake? How do these exchanges compare to what you know of competitive wrestling? Do you know the sport's history in Ancient Greece? How do the performers in these matches have to train for safety? Are there instances in which they display positive behavior?

  • Does watching fighting and arguing on-screen make you uncomfortable? Does seeing this kind of behavior normalize it or otherwise change how you view it in the real world?

TV details

Themes & Topics

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For kids who love wrestling

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