Small Town Girl

Music review by
Kathi Kamen Goldmark, Common Sense Media
Small Town Girl Music Poster Image
Idol gets down with happy country chirp.
Popular with kids

Parents say

age 6+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 8+
Based on 10 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this music.

Positive Messages

Some strong, clear, but gentle messages about caring for oursleves and one another.

Violence

One song addresses violence in a relationship, but not graphically.

Sex

Only the subtlest of innuendo.

Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Kellie Pickler's lyrics are as clean-cut as she appears to be. This small-town girl delivers gentle messages of empowerment and also knows how to have a little fun. "Wild Ponies" addresses the issue of relationship abuse, and "I Wonder" expresses heartbreak over an absentee dad.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byPSEVERT April 9, 2008

I LAUGHED AND CRIED

I KNEW FROM THE BEGINNING OF AMERICAN IDOL THAT KELLY WOULD BECOME A COUNTRY MUSIC STAR.THIS CD IS AWESOME.KELLY REALLY MAKES YOU THINK ABOUT SEVERAL ISSUES IN... Continue reading
Adult Written bybjkoslin April 9, 2008

Great Voice...

At first I was alittle hesistant. because im not a huge AI fan.. but Kellie had a song i could totally relate to.. "I wonder" Deals with an absentee M... Continue reading
Teen, 15 years old Written byChristian_girl May 26, 2010

I See Where the Title Comes From

I have found my rythym. Every time I review an album, I think, I'll review every song by itself, one by one. This idea was inspired by my two compliments o... Continue reading
Kid, 11 years old April 9, 2008

wow i loved it

well i watch it a lot so i realy know what its like so i wold advise pepole to turn on your tv

What's the story?

On her SMALL TOWN GIRL album, Kellie Pickler rushes out of the gate with "Red High Heels," declaring to a deadbeat boyfriend "You thought I'd wait around forever but baby get real ... I'm about to show you just how missin' me feels/in my red high heels." The strong country-rock beat and sassy tone are suited to the American Idol runner-up's perky country chirp; the track succeeds on the basis of its good-natured attitude more than anything close to brilliant songwriting or performance. One bright light in her songwriting is from "Things That Never Cross a Man's Mind" ("that joke is too dirty, this steak is too thin, that car is too fast, this beer is too cold"). It's clever and funny, and shows Pickler at her best.

Is it any good?

Unfortunately, Pickler doesn't stick to material that allows her to strut her best stuff. Several cloying, overly slick ballads are several too many. "Didn't You Know How Much I Loved You" is pointless and whiny and only serves to emphasize vocal weaknesses. "Wild Ponies" delivers a poignant story about a woman's emancipation from an abusive relationship, but the lyrics are so banal and corny that the message loses potency. Pickler and her producers might do well to consider the fact that you don't have to hit your audience over the head to get a point across.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the ways in which Pickler uses her voice on this album. Should she stick to the kinds of songs she performs well, or is it brave and cool that she tries her hand at ballads that are currently beyond her vocal and dramatic abilities?

Music details

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