Some People Have Real Problems

Music review by
Jessica Dawson, Common Sense Media
Some People Have Real Problems Music Poster Image
Safe, sophisticated lyrics from indie darling.

Parents say

age 14+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 9+
Based on 4 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this music.

Positive Messages

Overall themes of self-empowerment, positive love, being good to yourself.

Violence

One line in track "Playground," but only in juvenile/playful means; "I'll be sure to write you from the war/put your guns away it's tea time."

Sex

One playful reference to sex: "See I'll never get laid while I'm running your life."

Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Song titled "Girl You Lost to Cocaine," but it's about getting away from someone who is bad for you, not about drugs. Few references to drinking: "I took you home when you drank too much" and "You shot me up, yeah/you filled my cup/I've drunk my last beer with you."

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this album from the lead singer of indie favorite Zero 7 is squeaky clean. There is a song titled "The Girl You Lost to Cocaine," but it never refers to the drug and is more about escaping someone who is a negative influence. The rest of the CD covers positive themes such as being good to yourself and self-empowerment.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Teen, 16 years old Written bybrandi253 October 25, 2010
the song 'breathe me' is kinda a bad song for young kids. but in my opinion, i like 'breathe me'
Teen, 14 years old Written byHeather_loves_u April 9, 2008

What's the story?

In her third solo album, SOME PEOPLE HAVE REAL PROBLEMS, Aussie singer Sia has truly given a gift, to old fans and new, of beautiful arrangements and sophisticated vocals. Her songs have been featured in the finale episode of Six Feet Under and in The O.C.. But, after listening to this album, every song could be a powerful anthem on the big screen, too. The bluesy-pop ballad "Little Black Shoes" is a great radio song, about getting away from a negative relationship ("These little black sandals are walking me away"). "Lentil" is striking with strings accompaniment, and "Academia" is clever with a mouthful of fun lyrics to chew on.

Is it any good?

Sia is a gentler Fiona Apple and a more soulful Tori Amos, with impressive poetic lyrics and music that is constantly surprising. Some people may have real problems, but anyone with this album won't have a problem listening to it again and again.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the growing dilemma of pop stars and celebrities losing their battles with addiction and increasingly self-destructive behavior. Why is it that so many artists fall into the trap of addiction? Is the entertainment industry to blame? Are certain entertainers more prone to addiction or negative behavior? Why? What could be done to stop this harmful trend?

Music details

  • Artist: Sia
  • Release date: January 8, 2008
  • Label: Hear Music
  • Genre: Indie Rock
  • Parental advisory: No
  • Edited version available: No

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