Kid reviews for Down the Mysterly River

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Common Sense says

age 12+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 12+

Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 12+

Based on 2 reviews

age 12+

Really good fantasy book

This is a very good fantasy, not very violent, and very exciting. It is funny too, and has some great characters. The ending is great. However, the only thing that bothered me was the worldbuilding, which was okay, except the elements didn't quite fit in. Also, the minor characters could have been a bit better. (Especially the Eggman, who could have been more mysterious. He could have been a bit more like Angela from Eragon, who was probably the best character out of tat series.) The idea of the world itself is good, I liked that twist, although because of it the writer can't give you more information about the world early on, so it seems a bit... unrealistic. I would recomend this book to kids who like a good fantasy-adventure with touches of humor. Kids who like animal books would also enjoy this, because while the animals aren't Redwall-y, they are still very humanlike in their speech and thought processes. (Like the warrior cats.) Even girls can enjoy this book (I'm a girl :) ) but I think boys would be better off reading it, since there are no major girl characters. (In fact there are like 3 females in there.) But it is recommended.

This title has:

Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
age 12+

A good fantasy; bordering on violence levels

Down the Mysterly River is a fun fantasy for older readers. Max "the Wolf" is intelligent and brave, putting his boy scout and detective skills to good use throughout the course of the story. McTavish the cat is probably my favourite character, but he is the world's worst role model EVER. McTavish is a NASTY barnyard cat who has risen to become "King of the Barnyard" through numerous fights. Incorporated in the story through Walden, the bear's, memories are bits of trickster tales, though Walden himself is the hopeless sheriff on whom the tricks are played. The story is rather violent, and multiple characters die or are injured. Also, a more philosophical form of violence, that some readers might find more disturbing, is what the "Blue Cutters" do. They "cut" out a creature's "self" and replace it with their own idea of what the "self" should be like. Boys may find this preferable, as all the female characters are villains, or unimportant.

This title has:

Educational value
Great messages
Great role models