All parent member reviews for Ender's Game

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Parents say

(out of 34 reviews)
AGE
13
QUALITY
 
Review this title!
Parent Written bypaula nicolette September 25, 2011
AGE
18
QUALITY
 

What parents should know!

If any parent ever wonders where young people get their ideas of violent, rude, inconsiderate behaviors, this would be a perfect example. Reading all the positive reviews have surprised me. Have we become so decensotized with all our aggressive video games and negative shows, that this is all OK. There are great ways to teach literature, language skills and good character, Let's find them and put this book on the shelf.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Adult Written byseifert_jamie April 9, 2008
AGENot rated for age
QUALITY
 

Best Sci-Fi book ive read

My name is Jamie, I am seventeen years old and a junior in High School. I was motivated by my English teacher to start reading this book and throughout the book I was required to write notes, complete quizzes, and have class discussions which proves that I have a commendable understanding of the novel The things I liked about the novel is that it portrays emotions such as anger, love, and hate. Examples of this are the love between Ender and Valentine, the anger between Ender and his competitors, and the hate between Ender and his brother Peter. I also like how Card goes in to detail about the events happening such as war, violence, and competition for power. Some examples of this is the wars between the buggers and humans, the violence Ender has to go through against other boys, and the competition that the armies have against each other. I liked this because these emotions and events that occur in the book take place in our lives every day. I only disliked a few things throughout the story such as Ender and his siblings being most intelligent children and the things they did at such a young age. I also disliked how Ender was sent to battle school at the age of six, and the fact that he became a commander and the world was relying on him at such a young age is pretty bizarre. The pacing of the story was great, there was never a time that I wasn’t guessing what was going to happen next. Card used great foreshadowing to create suspense throughout the novel. I thought the character development was great especially for Ender because as a young boy he was very kind and loving but as he got older he developed evil and cruel characteristics like his brother which he hated. The sentence structure was mostly in third person perspective told by the narrator with the exception of the discussions at the beginning of each chapter. I feel a connection with this novel when Card displays many examples of competition because I am a very competitive person and this made me get into the book better. I liked some of the literary techniques that Card used throughout the novel. My favorite was the foreshadowing at the beginning of each chapter because it hinted that there was something exciting going to happen later in the chapter which made me want to keep reading. The foreshadowing also gave me a better understanding at the end of the chapter. People who enjoy science fiction would definitely love this book and even people that aren’t science fiction fans because the novel has a lot of action, drama, and suspense. I recommend the novel Ender’s Game for people of ages above thirteen and for people that enjoy genres such as action, suspense, thriller, and drama. The book does contain some profanity so I recommend a parent reading it before allowing their child to read it.
Adult Written byDr3w November 7, 2011
AGE
18
QUALITY
 

Not A Game for Kids

I loved this book, ok? I read it when I was seventeen and I thought it was great. That said, I would never let any of my younger siblings read it, and honestly I would have been kind of embarassed if my dad had picked it up and started skimming it. There's just too much foulness in this book for kids. Language is used FREQUENTLY! Not just every once in a while. I estimate that there were probably at least fifty obscenities and fifty profanities within its pages. No f-words, but still not appropriate language being used at all. Violence is for the most part not too terrible. There are a few sexual innuendos and situations, but it's mainly the language that makes me hesitant to recommend this book. Also, the themes and ideas in it are not something that you simply hand to a twelve year old and hope they'll be able to wade through.
What other families should know
Great messages
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Adult Written byGhcool April 9, 2008
AGENot rated for age
QUALITY
 

A book about children written for adults.

ENDER'S GAME is written from the character of Ender Wiggin’s point of view. The story is about the future in which aliens called Buggers have attacked Earth. Luckily, the Earth has won the First and Second Bugger Invasions, but the Third one will probably be the most difficult. Therefore the International Fleet, "... the only military [force] that meant anything anymore ..." has recruited genius children to go to Battle School in outer space and save the planet (Ender’s Game 17). The most intelligent of these children are Ender and Bean. One of the strongest criticisms of ENDER'S GAME is that in reality "... children don’t actually think or speak the way the children in [the Ender novels] think and speak" (Ender’s Game xix). I happen to agree with this assessment. The cognitive abilities of the children in the HARRY POTTER books were more grounded in reality than the cognitive abilities of the children in the ENDER'S GAME. That was one of the reasons the story worked so well. The children in Card’s Battle School talk and think more like adults. This is a suspension of disbelief that may not be acceptable to most people.
Parent Written byKapad October 14, 2012
AGE
16
QUALITY
 

Six year olds REALLY!!!???

For others to say that this book provides positive role models is a very twisted perspective. The book is written about 6-8 year olds (innocent children) acting like puberty hit at age 3 and testosterone levels were over the top from the womb. As I have read many of the reviews written by children, I note that a number of them state explicitly that they kept forgetting that the main characters were little children. Maybe that is due to the fact that other than Card telling us in a line or two that they are, everything else in the book from dialogue to social interactions between the characters is obviously beyond even teenage expression. After having read several Card books, I have concluded that he has a number of personality defects that come out in his books... exhibitionism, contempt for even proper authority, and the need to insert sexuality into all of his books that were presumably written for children... well, let's just say that I would never hire him to babysit my children. I was shocked to learn that Card is a Mormon. I had always thought that Mormons were known and even stereotyped for their high, even extreme morals... not Card! For an adult book, the plot and story line were fine as long as you could forget that it was a kindergartener who was speaking and acting like a Navy SEAL. In many ways, the books real social or literary "value" is all stolen from Lord of the Flies, and better exploited in The Hunger Games. Not much new to offer, and not very thought provoking. (Although it did leave me pondering if my personal experience with six year olds has been too limited. I'll have to sit down with one, over a cigar and coffee, in a nightclub and have a conversation with one.)
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Adult Written byTravySpeak October 13, 2011
AGE
15
QUALITY
 

Will make you love reading.

Ender's Game was, in my opinion, an amazing story. The way Card (author of Enders Game) depicts human behavior is a real eye opener. His writing has a sense of excitement that just made me want to come back for more. When reading from the perspective of Ender you don't just read about the choices he makes but Card takes you through the process of how Ender thinks. This perspective of not only choice but thought brings you closer to Ender as a reader and allows you to perceive Enders choices in a way you may not have before. Aside from amazing description Enders Game is a bit of a dark story. Throughout the book there are examples of manipulation and violence from both main and supporting characters. Violence in combination with brief, however present, sexuality requires a bit of maturity from the reader. Granted this is no Steven King horror novel, however for these reasons i suggest readers of Enders Game be of age 15 or older. Suggestions and ratings aside, Enders Game is an amazing story full of description, action, mystery, and drama. To those of you who have or choose to read this book, you understand what i mean when i say. This book will make you love reading. Related books include: Speaker for the Dead, Xenocide, Children of the Mind, and Ender in Exile.
Parent of a 12 year old Written bysbird June 20, 2010
AGE
12
QUALITY
 

A great, moral book for anyone 12-92

I read this as an adult having heard about it from a friend. Fantastic science fiction and I immediately passed it on to my son. It is brutal in places but there is extensive discussion of moral issues throughout, and it's deeply relevant to my son's kind of thinking these days. Can't recommend it enough.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Great messages
Great role models
Adult Written byzzzmarcus April 9, 2008
AGENot rated for age
QUALITY
 
Adult Written bySonicPAJ November 27, 2013
AGE
15
QUALITY
 

A VICTORY on Multiple Fronts!!!

ENDER'S GAME by Orson Scott Card is one of the most fascinating stories I've read. It shows the journey of young Andrew "Ender" Wiggin, he's a "third" in a world where parents are only permitted to have up to two children. However the government allowed his birth aware of his gifts, so he can train in battle-school to defeat the menacing "Buggers." Ender though doesn't have it all easy. His thoughts are constantly being brought back to all the bullies his life has and to the few allys he has had all the while trying so hard not to show weakness. Meanwhile, the side-story involving Ender's siblings back home is thought provoking and a bit amusing. Orson Scott Card's novel brings the readers to deeply empathize with the titular Ender as he interacts and reacts to the equally striking characters he encounters. One thing though, Card doesn't shy away from the kids spewing agressive language including toilet humor. All the same, the technology (especially the games) are fascinating. (Who wouldn't think Anti-Gravity-Space-Laser-Freeze-Tag wouldn't be cool?!) Do bring a dictionary along for the read, because there are loads of political terms that not even I understood. (But they are real, I assure you.) This novel is a must-read. Originally the story was written during the Cold-War and some of the technology in this book has already come to past. VERDICT: A Deep Sci-Fi Book that shows a realistic pressure of the world on a Young chosen one in traing via "Laser Tag" and "Video Games." It's a blast on Sooo Many LEVELS!!!
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Parent of a 2 and 11 year old Written byZephyrzInferno March 19, 2011
AGE
11
QUALITY
 

A great book for mature kids.

I love this book. Because of the dramatic ending, I had my son read it too. We were able to talk about things not always being as they seem and some issues about hate and violence. This is probably better for more mature kids, however.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Educational value
Adult Written byWilliamSmo September 15, 2010
AGE
13
QUALITY
 

pg 65

On page 65 there is some very racist jokes that are just bizarre. Why are they even there. The idea that a 6 year old would joke around like that is just strange. I don't see how it helps the story in any way. This is a good book, but why the pointless racist jokes?
Parent of a 5 year old Written bystaceyebox April 9, 2008
AGENot rated for age
QUALITY
 

Best science fiction author, older teens only

Several disturbing scenes that would not be appropriate for anyone under 13 at least. Frequent swearing and rude language; frequent mention of the children being naked, once male and female in the same dorm. Behavior by adults in the book (there are few, and mostly minor characters) toward the children would be considered abusive in our society. Although, this is ncessary to the premise of the book. Overall, a highly enjoyable book. My teen and I both read it and had great discussions afterward.
Parent of a 10 year old Written byskanish July 29, 2009
AGE
13
QUALITY
 

perfect for adults teens, and unusuallly mature tweens, a bit too violent and deep for younger children or sensitive tweens.

War from a futuristic, child's point of view. Read the other books in the series as well to get a very interesting multi dimensional perspective about war and fear of "the other". the Bean series is also interesting, but gets a bit wrapped up in politics in the second book. My 9 year old "philosopher" son loved it, but I doubt many others his age would.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Adult Written byFanLiu June 8, 2009
AGE
14
QUALITY
 
Parent of a 11 year old Written byJanes Cloud October 17, 2013
AGE
15
QUALITY
 

Too much bad language for under 15

I do not recommend this for younger readers. There is too much bad language and at least 3 really bad racial slurs that I remember off the top of my head. However I do think it is a good book for teens because there are morals to be learned even in such a violent setting as a war. The racial slurs can be discussed and understood more for older teens than younger kids. My son does not even know what these mean and I am not sure at 11-12 or even at 13, I want to introduce that type of bigotry when he will have several years of innocence to the ugliness that can be found in the world. Many modern books have quite a bit violence but I do not objective to this nearly as much as the bad language and racial epitaphs. Only because cartoons have introduced a certain level of violence at young ages and I have discussed this aspect repeatedly with my son when he wants to watch or read the Avengers, Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, etc. At least these authors were able to get their point of view without the use of curse words. Lord of the Flies was required reading for me when I was 12 and it was just as disturbing as any controversial books today, but I do not think we would have been required to read it at such a young age had there been as much bad language as Ender's Game. Reading or listening to the news can be more violent than most books but I want to teach my son and his generation to be respectful because now a days teens curse so often in public no matter if there are little ones around to hear or not. They just do not seem to think of others around them. Yes my son hears these words at the store, at school and walking down the street but he doesn't like it and wishes people would refrain from using them. So this book can wait until he is older and not AS impressionable. I gave it 4 stars however because it is well written and the author's note explains his point of view of why he thinks kids in the situation in the book talk and act how they do so it's a great book for 15+ to read and discuss.
What other families should know
Educational value
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Adult Written byjcq October 12, 2013
AGE
13
QUALITY
 

Great lessons; broadens horizons

This novel is about the big picture. It has changed people, and I heartily suggest it to those who are capable of understanding it. This, unfortunately, doesn't include some adults who will passively read it for entertainment. The last chapter, "The Speaker for the Dead," takes the work to the next level. First, it is a story about a boy and all the struggle he faces. Ultimately, he meets his destiny at a very young age. The novel is a slow process of disillusionment, which is very powerful and empowering for youth. Ender, as a youth, lacks agency in his life, which he constantly ponders. He regains his agency at the end of the novel which sparks two series based on this world. He has a new mission in life, and it is to reverse the wrongs he caused in fulfilling a prescribed destiny. Ultimately, I suggest as a parent to know your child, read the text, and use knowledge of your child's capacities to inform what censorship to apply to him or her.
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Educator and Parent Written byMamaJota October 8, 2013
AGE
12
QUALITY
 

It's NOT the End of the World if you Read This Book!☺

As a teacher and parent of two teenagers, I found this book interesting and captivating. Any bad language was used only to develop the characterization and was not overwhelming for teens reading it. Even though the book is about war, and there are battles present throughout Ender's life with his brother, other children, and eventually the buggers, there are moments of humanity and compassion in Ender, Valentine, and other characters. Their actions remind us humans are not only manipulative and capable of killing, but we're also forgiving, loyal, and helpful.
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Educator Written byasaloka December 12, 2010
AGE
14
QUALITY
 

An amazing book that helps to interest even the most reluctant readers

Clearly (from some of the reviews on this site) this book and its intricacies may be beyond the mental maturity level of some younger readers as well as others. This is one of those rare books that is very complex in areas of theme and character development, yet is on an easy enough reading level that struggling high school readers won't become frustrated. Every detail in this book, from the jokes, to the nudity, to the need to have a child lead the International Fleet, is very well and appropriately placed. This is also an excellent book to use for encouraging open discussion on many topics as well as for helping students to understand deeper levels of fiction and human nature than they usually see in print.
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Parent of a 15 year old Written byjakefreedom February 14, 2011
AGE
2
QUALITY
 

Should not be a children's book

This book is full of swearing by children as young as 6. It is also very violent and has racial slurs. I deleted this book and Card's other book "The lost gate" from my and my daughter's Nook library. There are ton of other fantasy books that we both love where the author doesn't need to use language and violence to sell them. Just because this was originally intended as an adult novel doesn't give it the right to be okay. I don't think it should have ever been turned into a children's book. I know this author can write a decent book, I loved "The pathfinder."
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Parent of a 8, 11, and 13 year old Written byHSLitTeacher March 9, 2010
AGE
13
QUALITY
 
This book is required reading in my 9th grade class. The kids LOVE it every year-- out of the 6 novels we read, this is by far their favorite. Occasionally I get a very conservative family upset over the cussing and killing, but it's certainly tamer than a PG-13 movie.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much swearing

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