All teen and kid member reviews for Ender's Game

Kids say

(out of 111 reviews)
age 12+
Review this title!
Teen, 14 years old Written bymatsuifan13 November 27, 2009

Great book but fairly violent.

This book was one of the greatest I have ever read. I love Orson Scott Card and this is the book that launched my love for his novels
What other families should know
Too much violence
Teen, 15 years old Written byWingWolf July 2, 2013

Why Everyone Should Read Ender's Game

Ender's game is one of the best science fiction books I have ever read that can be enjoyed by both children and adults. This book is taught in many schools to children as young as eleven. Personally, my dad is a huge science fiction fan and gave this book for me to read when I was eight. I loved it, but I can see how some parents would be hesitant to give this book to young children. There is a lot of violence in this book, but Ender really grows as a character and I feel that the overall theme of this book is about compassion and humanity - it is much more philosophical than just an alien vs. human war. The language might also be an issue for some parents. I think Orson Scott Card used some profanities in order to illustrate the culture of the battle-school. The characters are kids trying to be tough soldiers, and it's natural that eventually the kids would develop a unique dialect of sorts. I also admire that Orson Scott Card can write children well. So many authors portray children as either miniature adults or some sort of mentally challenged sub-species of humans. But the characters in Ender's Game, while naturally gifted, are still children, but most importantly, Card depicts them as people. In the end, I think this book is universal - it is something that everyone should read. Even after 30+ years, this book is still amazing, and will undoubtedly be a classic for years to come. It's won the hugo and nebula award for best book, and is a must-read for any science fiction fan. That being said, know your kid before letting them read this book. I think middle-school through high-school are good ages to pick up Ender's Game. But any bright kid who loves reading, and likes books filled with action and adventure would love it.
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Teen, 13 years old Written bySanCritical January 11, 2015

Ender's Game Book Review - The final soldier... The final battle

Ender's Game is a story telling of Ender Wiggin, a young boy accepted into the orbiting Battle School, where children participate in mock games with null gravity and engage in highly exhaustive military training. Before this takes place, Ender lives with his caring but distant parents, his barbarous brother Peter and the person he loves the most: his sister Valentine. Despite being Orson Scott Card's first science fiction novel, Ender's Game is a fantastic story for its time. Techniques such as foreshadowing have been used widely throughout the whole story. "'I've watched through his eyes, I've listened through his ears, and I tell you he's the one. Or at least as close as we're going to get.'" It has become exceptionally effective as it begins at each chapter with a discussion between two people, foreshadowing the events later to commence. Ender's Game is all about children, and is discussed through the theme of youth. The story tells of many children, including Ender. The factor of these children is that they're not friends. They are competition; rather not innocent children to be. They are bullies, murderers and manipulators. Through these symbols, Orson Scott Card conveys his opinion on children, they're not innocent. The effectiveness of is grand characterisation has followed this theme, "Ender felt sick. He had only meant to catch the boy's arm..." Manipulation is another theme that supports the walkthrough of Ender's Game. Ender has been cheated, lied to and used as a pawn by the adults in what is not a game. Ender summarises this clearly and succinctly when he notes, "I've spent my life as someone's pawn." This is not the only manipulative relationship. There are other relationships involving manipulation: Peter manipulates his sister Valentine (to a degree); Peter and Valentine manipulate the world and Ender himself manipulates many children throughout the entire book. Foreshadowing comes into matters once more; its effectiveness follows manipulation, as Ender notes early, "Sometimes lies were more dependable than the truth." Orson Scott Card divides the matter in two. On one case, it is wrong to manipulate a child. On the other case, it is vital to manipulate a child to fulfill needs; the adults manipulate Ender in order to destroy the alien invaders. Warfare is the base connector of the themes of manipulation and youth. The most significant piece of Ender's life is the war between him and the alien invaders. Yet, Orson Scott Card never implemented a direct vision of the third invasion. It is designed to be a simulation. This is not the first war Ender has fought in. To be precise, Ender's life is made of other wars, talking psychologically. This battle is always between him and other children, his brother who is rather callous and himself. During this battle, he suffers from isolation, pressure from the adults, the fear of becoming Peter and the fear of the alien invaders. The rich imagery's and repetition's effectiveness follow this theme. Ender notes multiple times, "The enemy gate is down." Physically, the gate is down for his army to pass through; psychologically, however, Ender can never pass through until the very end. "The enemy ignored him and continued firing at the soldiers firing at them," notes Ender, during mock battles at Battle School. Physically, Ender has always had his eye watching the enemy, learning their strategy and how they think. Psychologically, the enemy has really never accounted as an enemy, Ender ponders on this further and sees that the alien invaders' true form was not as he thought it would be. "When I understand my enemy well enough to defeat him, then in that moment, I also love him." says Ender, fulfilling his sympathy for his enemies. Despite any dirty language or dirty behaviour in this book, Ender's Game is a novel that cannot be avoided forever. Orson Scott Card has taken science fiction concepts of war, themes, techniques, devices and language; combined them into a seamless story. He presents a compelling story with an amazing ending that will pull you in all directions. Ender Wiggin awaits you at the battlefield. Will you join him?
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Kid, 12 years old April 9, 2008

Best Book in the World!!

The beginning pages were somewhat confusing with two random people(at the start)conversing but then you learn who they are and the story picks up and you become really interested. The violence isn't bad, it fits with the story. You might find yourself crying when Ender(the main character) suffers. It's written well and you will definitely reread it.
Teen, 17 years old Written byArtichokes-United May 12, 2013

Thought-Provoking and Brilliant.

While I'm not too fond of the author, Ender's Game is a deeply interseting and well written book. Managing to combine action and adventure with a insighful and thought-provoking story, this book left me breathless and wanting more. It should be know that this book not only exhibits violence and profanity but also deals with issues of a deep psychological level, and may be difficult for younger kids to comprehend. This book is definitely not afraid to ask the tough questions.That being said, Ender's Game is a truely stunning novel that can be appreciated by both teens and adults alike. This book captures the spirit of the Science Fiction genre while focusing more on the emotional and mental status of our main character. All in all, I find this book to be more about the human condition, than one simply defined as people vs. aliens. It's a fantastic and prfound read, and remains one of my favorites.
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Teen, 15 years old Written byendymion737 August 15, 2014

My favorite book of all time

I read this book when I was 12, and a lot of the stuff went right over my head. When I went back and read it again, I realized that there was a lot of things that I missed that probably I shouldn't have read as a preteen. I love thought provoking things, and that's exactly what this book it. It deals with a lot of ethical and emotional issues. There is a fair amount of violence. The main character Ender, accidentally kills two people, although that isn't revealed until later in the book. Ender's brother, Peter, is a sociopath who kills and tortures animal for fun as well as beats up Ender. Ender is bullied by others with usually turns to violence. The language is probably the biggest issue that I noticed as I read which is why I don't recommend it for kids younger than 12. It is frequent and although it is limited to the "basic" swear words, it is frequent. I really do love this book though. It is amazing. I would recommend it to anyone. If you're debating reading the book after you've seen the movie, go for it!! Or if you're considering reading the book before the movie, you are the best!
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Kid, 12 years old July 21, 2012

My favorite sci-fi book of all time! The ideas and imagery will linger long when you finish the last page.

Reluctant and middle/high schoolers (especially hunger games fans) will have a real roller coaster in this one! This book is highly educated. Say like, why the end justifies the means, or why kids are desesnsitize in violence. There is much more in the book. The imagery and ideas are beautifully pictured. The characters are deeply-emotionally felt, the plot is fun to follow and will grab you pitch-sharp until you get interested, and there is a really big twist at the end (I'm not gonna tell you, you have to read the book first!) the positive messages and role models aren't the best. There s a perfect discussions about this book, the role models show that the main character (his name is Ender but thats what his sister calls him so is real name is Andrew) skilled with kills, wipes, he doesn't even understand The stakes. The positive messages show that even this book has disturbing violence, it is a gripping read for many middle/high schoolers and adults, and it is a perfect disscussion for this book. The violence is disturbing at times, quite frequently mentioned, and rather vicious, as kids kill other kids in unintentional deaths. A twisted boy tortures squirrels and skins them alive. Two boys beat up each other in a bathroom naked. Kids are led to commit genocide, albeit unknowingly. For the sexual imagery, the book describes several times that boys and girls are naked in dorms. A boy created a picture of a genitilia swiping back and forth on his computer screen. The language is moderate but frequently used. Probably a little higher than most PG-13 movies. Includes the word s--t, a--, son-of-b--ches, slum-b--ch, a--hole, b-lls, b-stard, pinp-ick, turd, crap, fart, fartin' round etc. I would think this is an 'iffy for 12' choice.
What other families should know
Educational value
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Teen, 15 years old Written byAsia K October 15, 2011

Yes.

I'm in grade 10, and I'd have to say Ender's Game is one of the best novels I've ever read. It deeply affected me, and once I was done with it, I couldn't stop thinking about it. (And the twist at the ending blew my mind.) I'm not sure if I'd recommend it for readers younger than 13 - some parts may be lost on them. It delves deep into the psychology of the characters, but it's also just a great, great read. And it's not just for teens either - in fact my dad was the one who recommended it to me!
Kid, 12 years old August 13, 2010

What's the fuss about again?

Okay, I've seen kids at my school reading this book, but never talking about it. So when it was on my summer reading list, I said why not and read it. Now, I can see why not. It's because it was almost a good book, but not quite. It almost had realistic characters, but due to them being so young that you feel more irritated and jelous than empathetic. It almost had suspense, but the parts that were supposed to suspensful had you fooled so that you aren't suspenseful at all. It almost had a good premise, but it ended up being "Okay, the world apparentaly has absolutely no good experienced generals, so lets make 10-year-olds command fleets". You never get a real sense of characters besides the Wiggins, but they're so smart I didn't care. The setting changed a bit too much for my taste, enough so it seemed a bit episodic. And the ending...it may set up a sequal nicely, but it was way to crazy for even a story as unrealistic this one and left me annoyed because it said the same values of tolerence and forgiveness that almost every other book I've ever read has. Overall, this book felt like a passable waste of time. Also, do children have no modesty? Why are they naked so much?
What other families should know
Too much sex
Teen, 17 years old Written byJRoker April 9, 2008

I was intrigued...

As part of many student leadership roles of extra curricular activities, succeeding in school is very important to me. Being a junior at my high school, the novel Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card is a required reading but it wasn't the requirement that made me turn the pages. What I favored most about the book was how well organized it was, and how Card made the reader feel as if they were growing alongside Ender throughout all of his trials and tribulations that he was forced to go through. I'm intrigued by how Card manages to keep a consice yet balanced sentence structure as well as maintain the conversational quality. Whilst the need to utilize your imagination is a must, I feel as if Card may have done so on purpose in order to keep the reader captivated. The deeper I got into the novel the more I understood about the vague characterizations of the mysterious speakers at the beginning of each chapter and the important role they played in where Ender's life would go. The unknown speakers of each chapter show how the author exercises dramatic irony and where they might lead Ender at that particular point of the book. Because there are universal meanings within each passage, it's not hard at all to find something symbolic at any point of the novel. Personification isn't used a lot in this writing but rather unfolds a handful of plot twists when you least expect it. This sort of surprise constantly keeps the reader on his feet waiting for the next eye-opener and how they are linked to each other. I find that this book is receptible to a large variety of readers; out of a handful of people, it's rare that I find someone who dislikes it. You don't have to possess an infatuation with science fictions stories to enjoy the adventures of Ender's Game, but rather be open to the inner meanings that are portrayed. This book is easily liked amongst adults simply because of the fact that the children in the book are more like mature young adults, rather then purile adolescents. Although, the younger crowd is drawn to the idea of a toddler being so intellectual and having vast amounts of power over an adult rather than being overpowered by them. Although this is a great book, the maturity of it's views of the world may not be what all parents want their younger children to be reading.
Kid, 12 years old July 29, 2012

Love the book, not the author.

When I first read Ender's Game, I loved it. It instantly became one of my favorite books. I then wen on to read the second and third book in the saga. These books made me rethink my morales, and changed what I looked for in a good book. Now I have read all of the Shadow books. A parallel series in the Ender Universe. I just bought the newest book Orson Scott Card wrote, and am reading another one of his books right now. I am amazed by the writing and the plots, but not with the author. About fifteen minutes ago I found out that Orson Scott Card is against same-sex marriage. Below I have put some excerpts from an article Mr. Card wrote for the Mormon Times. I am now contemplating whether I should keep reading his books. I did not know Mr. Card's opinion about this topic until today. If I had I probably wouldn't of read his books in the first place. Once again, amazing books, amazing writing, and a very unamazing author. Here is part of his column "THE FIRST AND GREATEST THREAT FROM COURT DECISIONS IN CALIFORNIA AND MASSACHUSETTS, GIVING LEGAL RECOGNITION TO “GAY MARRIAGE,” IS THAT IT MARKS THE END OF DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA.THESE JUDGES ARE MAKING NEW LAW WITHOUT ANY DEMOCRATIC PROCESS; IN FACT, THEIR DECISIONS ARE STRIKING DOWN LAWS ENACTED BY MAJORITY VOTE.ALREADY IN SEVERAL STATES, THERE ARE TEXTBOOKS FOR CHILDREN IN THE EARLIEST GRADES THAT SHOW “GAY MARRIAGES” AS NORMAL. HOW LONG DO YOU THINK IT WILL BE BEFORE SUCH TEXTBOOKS BECOME MANDATORY — AND PARENTS HAVE NO WAY TO OPT OUT OF HAVING THEIR CHILDREN TAUGHT FROM THEM?IT IS SUCH AN OBVIOUS OVERREACH BY JUDGES, FAR BEYOND ANY RATIONAL DEFINITION OF THEIR AUTHORITY, THAT EVEN THOSE WHO SUPPORT THE OUTCOME OF THE DECISIONS SHOULD BE HORRIFIED BY THE MEANS."
What other families should know
Educational value
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Kid, 12 years old August 28, 2013

Depressed Rebellion

I absolutely love the book. I think that even though it has some very strong violent scenes, they are not described in details so its all right. I think If your a kid, then this book is perfect because it talks about the predictability of kids. It also talks of manipulating the kids by adults so you can chew on that thought and how to become less predictable.
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Teen, 15 years old Written byarchive360 November 17, 2009

weee ha ha

no! no! no! No!
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much consumerism
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Teen, 13 years old Written byarmageddon135 April 9, 2008
Kid, 12 years old October 16, 2013

Sci-Fi Must Read!

Swearing wise, it is honestly not that bad although some people think so. Swearing in this book is used frequently but is not very strong language at all. The book is a great read and is personally my favourite book and I am currently 12 years old.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Teen, 15 years old Written bymasonkuick April 8, 2011

perfect for any kids of the age at least 9 and up

awesome!
Teen, 16 years old Written bynautical March 2, 2011
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Teen, 13 years old Written byTheOnlyElijah January 15, 2014

A Good Book, but LOTS of Language and Violence

The story line is good, and the ending is great. However- SEX: 5.7/10 -Boys and Girls are walking BUTT NAKED through dorms. Ender is talking with a girl about peeing, talk about "kissing butts" and male gentiles A LOT. -No sexual activity, however. LANGUAGE: 9.0/10 -The word "b--ch" or "son or a b--ch" is used VERY often. -The words "crap" and "s--t" are used a infrequently. Also a few "Ender silently cursed him"s. -No f-words or talk of sex besides peeing is used. VIOLENCE: 9.9/10 -Ender wipes out an entire species all because he was selfish and wanted to go home. -Ender accidentally kills two kids through violence. -Ender is aware of this and is trying not to be a killer, but that failed.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Teen, 13 years old Written byabbyroserox January 14, 2013

Ender's Game Book Review

I think that this book is a little hard to follow. I'm 13 and I am reading Ender's Game in school right now. It has frequent swearing which is ok.. just the basic words. There is a lot of violence in this book, war, kids beating up other kids, and a lot of fight scenes. The age range is 13+, there is some hard vocabulary words and the book can be confusing in parts.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Teen, 16 years old Written bypracticalpessimist March 2, 2011

Fantastic science fiction classic

This book is one of my all time favorites. Orson Scott Card is an incredible writer, and the Ender series is my favorite of all his works. Ender's Game deals with some very complex topics and characters that may be hard to grasp for a younger audience, but the book itself is written in such a way that it is readable for almost anyone in spite of that. It can be contemplated deeply and be enjoyed that way, but it can also be enjoyed for the story and characters on a less analytic level. I first read this book when I was 8 (my parents do not censor my reading material as they do not know English well) and have reread it numerous times since, while also delving into the rest of the series and the numerous parallels and prequels that Card has written. At age 8, I found the book incredibly gruesome. Violence is perhaps the only thing that I would reckon that would be of major concern with parents. Children kill other children, children are taught to act ruthlessly, and other events such as the giant's drink have some violent material. Thus, I would probably say that an appropriate age for this book would be at around the age of a high school student. In my opinion, the language is mild and infrequent. "Fart" is probably the most commonly used questionable word, which is hardly a crude word. Other sorts of cursing occur only once in a while. The children in battle school are also naked in their quarters, but it is only briefly mentioned, so I would hardly call it nudity. There are honestly much worse forms of nudity and language that occur in other science fiction books such as 1984 (another fantastic book, by the way). Ender's Game is very appropriate for teenagers in comparison. The most common piece of criticism I have heard over this book is about how unrealistic and incredulous the children's behavior and verbalization are. Their behavior is placed in there for a reason, and I believe it allows the book to delve into deeper themes and development to contemplate. Although this deals with war and guns (things that one would generally think that would attract a young boy's interest), this book can appeal to a wide audience. As a girl, I thoroughly enjoyed this, as well as my adult-aged brother as well. Overall, this is an absolutely amazing science fiction classic. It would be more suitable for a high school aged reader, only because of the violence and somewhat gruesome descriptions.
What other families should know
Too much violence

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