All parent member reviews for Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy

Parents say

(out of 4 reviews)
age 11+
 
Review this title!
Educator Written bykathryn1 January 8, 2015
 

Excellent writing, great story

I would recommend that kids below age 12 read this with an adult for clarification of the language and wording and in order to understand the background of some of the events. It is a wonderful, heart-wrenching story, but I think that based on my time in the 5th and 6th grade classroom, many 9 year-olds would struggle with it.
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Parent of a 17 year old Written bylimehottie May 11, 2011
 

Perfect for sixth grade and beyond

I absolutely loved this book! The message was so good and the characters were amazing. I would very highly reccomend this book to anyone looking for a good read!
What other families should know
Too much violence
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Adult Written byMrs. Druckenmiller December 14, 2009
 

Great for the classroom

This is a great book to use in the classroom (maybe as a read-aloud) to introduce children to the concepts of racism and discrimination. It could lead to many positive discussions of how people are treated vs. how they should be treated.
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Adult Written bysoccersweetie8806 April 1, 2009
 

A Great Tale of Friendship

When Turner and his parents move Phippsburg, Maine Turner find life dull and stifling until he meets Lizzie Bright Griffin, a young African American girl from a nearby island. The two young children form a close bond despite Turner's fathers disapproval. The elders at Turner's fathers church decide that if they want to bring tourists in they would have to remove people on Malaga Island which is where Lizzie lives with her family. This story paints of picture of racism in the early 20th century. It is a touching story but sad at the same time. It shows how young people can grown and mature drastically in front of a reader's eyes.