Kid reviews for Lord of the Flies

Common Sense says

Gripping story of marooned schoolboys and their savagery.
Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 13+
Based on 3 reviews

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 31 reviews
Teen, 14 years old Written byAwalkeratCSM March 28, 2012

A thoughtful entree for smart teens served to you by mindful, extraordinary author

I have "Lord of the Flies" to thank for getting me to really like my English teacher (oh, the discussions we had and the allegorical insight she gave me!) and opening my eyes to the magic of allegories. An expertly crafted allegory that can be seen from a political (I think), religious, and social perspective, "Lord of the Flies" is a book that I highly recommend only to smart, mature teens who can read past the lines of a tale of savagery and survival and see a thought-provoking, viewpoint-changing message of the necessity and importance of civilization or religion, depending on what viewpoint you're seeing the story through. The story surrounds the crashing of a plane full of British school boys and the events that follow as the boys, who survive the plane crash unlike the grown ups that attended them, try to survive on the island and maintain a sane, orderly environment until the grown ups see their signal fire. Mature, blonde, and attractive Ralph is initially chosen as the leader of the band of survivors, and makes his main purpose the maintainment of the signal fire. Choir leader Jack, a dominating individual with an evil intent as dangerously red as his hair, tries to do his part in helping the group survive by attempting to hunt the pigs that thrive on the island, but instead awakens a blood-thirstiness within him that is not just dangerous to the swine on the island. What follows is conflict within the "tribe" of boys, the sudden entrance of a fearful beast on the mountain top of the island, savagery conducted by Jack against other boys, tragic deaths, and a heart-racing ending that isn't quite epic: heart-wrenching, destructive, and a conclusion full of closure and realization for both the reader and the characters. In the copy of the book loaned to me for school, a former student who used the book wrote in permanent, blue ink on a front page "Golding's question: what will happen to humanity when the bonds of civilization are loosed?". I see this question as a one posed from a social perspective, and Golding makes it quite clear through his expert penmanship that if we have no rules to live by, or grown ups to censor and correct us, we will be unable to survive in a peaceful, orderly society. By a religious perspective, you could rewrite the sentence as "Golding's question: what will happen, or what is happening, to humanity if we lose spiritual order and morals?"; if we do not have God's influence in our lives, we will subsequently fail in life morally and spiritually, and have something else happen to us that I can't specify because I would be leaking a big spoiler at the very end of the novel. I loved how I could find meaningful symbols on every detailed page, a clear connection between the allegory to real life, irony that made me laugh at the world alongside what was going on in the book, three different perspectives of the allegory, and a whole lot of meaning about society and our lives. Golding was a drag to read at times, especially if you had a big project on your mind or it was a nice day outside, but if I just plowed through it, I could get what he was saying and place all the jigsaw pieces of descriptions together to make a big, detailed picture of the allegory he was expertly crafting. The characters made wonderful symbols from the intellectuals and scientists we often go to for knowledge and technology to the mature leaders we heavily rely on to make big decisions for our nation, city, or, in the case of the allegory, tribe. I wondered once or twice, after finishing the novel and getting a good grade on my efforts in English on it, if Golding had written any other meaningful, worthwhile literature that pointed out dangerous aspects of our human nature that are so gracefully bound by rules of civilization and laws of morality and society; I hope that who ever reads this novel also comes away with a respect for this author and the no doubt many years he spent putting together his ideas into this allegory. Violence is the biggest issue in this novel. Several characters are killed in this novel, though the murder is far from glamorized. One character is thought to have died in an accidental forest fire caused by some of the other characters. Characters get wounded while having a spear fight, though nothing graphic is depicted. Language comes next in mature content, with a-s and maybe a few other questionable words. Sexuality? Let me point out that there are no girls whatsoever on the island, so there are no soppy romances or kisses to have to keep your eye out for (Sorry romance-lovers!) Just an occasion where boys go swimming nude, but Golding doesn't go into detail about their looks. In fact, as a discussion prompter, one should talk with other readers of this novel about how the book would have been different had it been girls who were stranded on the island, or both boys and girls on the island. You should also look up why Golding used boys in his novel and not girls; it gives a lot of credit to girls, by the way. Over all, there is very little mature content to look out for in this novel by today's standards, especially if the readers are thirteen and up as I suggest. There aren't exactly "good role models" in this book, all the characters are symbols of religions or types of people. But Ralph is resilient, and tries his utmost best to make good decisions for the tribe. Piggy is a great help to the boys and Ralph, and is very smart. Simon is quiet, caring (especially to the little boys in the tribe), righteous, and very spiritual, which I personally found very gratifying. I found it to be a great allegory for thoughtful, smart teens who like message-laden masterpieces in literature and long discussions with their English teacher. Thirteen and up and five full stars for "Lord of the Flies"!

This title contains:

Educational Value
Positive role models
Violence & scariness
Language
Kid, 12 years old June 8, 2014

Has a decent massage, but masked by terrible delivery

Probably one of the best ways to review this book is to compare it to other books similar to it. For this review, I'm going to compare it to a few. The plot is basically this: A bunch of boys are stranded on a deserted island and then they descend to savagery, till the deus ex machina comes and saves them all. Sounds okay, right? Actually, no. The first problem is the writing. The language sounds like slang, and I find it ridiculously hard to understand it. It's annoying when they use words like "biguns" and "littluns: when you can just say "big guys" and "small guys". The second problem is that it's EXTREMELY outdated (like the Chocolate War). It was created in the mid 1900s, so you can't really expect it to be as good as modern books since ideas in the book may have made sense 50 years ago, but today, it's just gibberish. The third, and probably the worst, problem are the characters. Why do the boys seem to acts so immature and petty? A lot of teens can probably relate, but to me, it's like nonsense and (unlike Christopher in The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime) not even interesting. If I wanted to see that, I can just go to school. The characters are so two-dimensional and have baked. The characters barely seem developed, and only have personalities that fit overused stereotypes like The Good Guy, The Bad Guy, The Nerd, The Peaceful and Rational Guy, etc. It's really hard to get the message under this trash, which I could say for a lot of books (and one of them is The Chocolate War, which is LOTF's child). Oh yeah, and there's a deus ex machina. Verdict: Slightly better than Chocolate War, but still horrible. Unrealistic and immature characters (was Giver like that?), incoherent dialogue, and boring plot all combine to make this book. Only good thing is the message, but trying to read this book is like trying to unroll that new toilet paper roll without ripping it. (Also, even though the message is about the savage nature in everyone, none of the plot would have happened with adults)
Kid, 10 years old March 27, 2012

Woot

Im reading it. Seems pretty Nice so far. A wonderful way of saying The message, But Newer Readers may not get it. And without the message, The book Crumbles. So new readers will probably be all like,"WTH?" Unless they get the message. Not nesesarily? violent.Well. Idk Yet.

This title contains:

Educational Value
Positive Messages
Positive role models
Violence & scariness
Language
Teen, 15 years old Written byromy97 April 22, 2013

It isnt any good..

I had to read this book for school when I was 12 (!!) and I hated it.. and until this day I still find this book way too violent, scary and confusing. The violence is quite intense and could disturb anyone under 12.. Or those who are more than 12 but sensitive. I dont reccomend it!!

This title contains:

Violence & scariness
Teen, 14 years old Written byJesse W November 9, 2014

A Classic

This is a great book, I suggest that the day your child can handle violence you put this book in their hands.

This title contains:

Educational Value
Positive Messages
Violence & scariness
Teen, 13 years old Written byILuvCandy August 6, 2012

Boring without paying attention!! Hopefully second time will be better! :D

I Had to read it in school and i didnt pay much attention to it most of the class thought that it was a really good book but the parts that i payed attention to were really boring.... Im going to read it again and hopefully see what my friends mean by AMAZING :O If u want to read it just pay attention to details!
Teen, 16 years old Written byamalva0518 April 23, 2013

Amazing book that should never be banned.

I believe this book is an amazing story about adventure and humanity. I think this is a good book for ages 14 and up because by then they will already be in high school and be able to comprehend what they are reading and will already know right from wrong. I think parents don't need to worry if a book talks about the evil in humanity because as long as they taught their kids right from wrong then what do they have to be worried about. If they raised their kids right then they shouldn't be worried about what they read. If this book is banned then so many things should be too like telling kids about 911 because it teaches how cruel and evil humanity is. Even though parents may not think it kids know that there is bad in the world but that there is also good. When I read books like these it made me realize how lucky I am to have rules and parents and what can happen without them and it made me feel better about my life.

This title contains:

Educational Value
Positive Messages
Positive role models
Violence & scariness
Teen, 14 years old Written byBUCKBUCK November 30, 2012

Required

Tis book is required in my english class and the violence was way too much for me but then again I hate scary stuff but yeah hate the killing parts.

This title contains:

Violence & scariness
Teen, 14 years old Written byAveragestudent April 27, 2017

It seemed to be remotely exciting but the entire class fell asleep after 1 page

No kid likes this no matter how well they lie to you. The ending is terrible and super conveniently made up just to cut the story off. Comparing this to hunger games is an insult.
Teen, 14 years old Written byMunchkinP August 10, 2015

Blew my mind.

I only read this book a year ago because I made the grievous assumption that Lord of the Flies was similar to The Swiss Family Robertson, which was the greatest bore ever. And then by chance I picked up the book and I was mesmerized. I read it all in one sitting; I think I set my personal record for fastest reading. ; ) It was deep, thought-provoking, complex, it really worked your mind! It's amazing that in such a short book Golding was able to develop characters that thoroughly. The violence seems to be the only real concern here, but it's not glorified - most of the scare in this book is pyschological. I honestly think, of the many classics I've read, this is my favorite.
Teen, 16 years old Written byfrench.cats June 11, 2015

Gory and a little violent...but AMAZING.

I would definitely recommend this book to anyone. Although it is a bit violent at times (and I myself usually don't like reading or watching violence), it truly is a wonderful book. The violence is simply part of the whole message of the book, and it is in no way promoted as something good. For younger readers, the themes of the book might be a little hard to understand and the book may either seem boring or gory, without understanding the themes. I enjoyed the realistic nature of the book, especially towards the end (I won't say what happens, but the very last page just breaks my heart!). I liked the book so much I finished it in a day and a half!

This title contains:

Educational Value
Violence & scariness
Teen, 13 years old Written byMissBookaHolic September 17, 2017

An exceptionally well-written book

I thought that this book was extremely well written with well-rounded characters and a rich, exciting plot. Set in a tropical jungle( maybe during the second world war?) a group of boys land on a uninhabited island after an airplane crashed, killing all the adults. Ralph, a twelve year old boy, was chosen as the chief of the tribe of young boys. They learn that survival in the wild is not all fun and games and that rules, no matter how tedious and foolish they may seem, are the only things they have left. Golding paints a shocking but honest picture of what we may become if cut off from civilization: a shrieking, painted horde of animals craving blood and human pain and fearful of imaginary beasts. All together this book is an excellent choice for boys and girls old enough to handle violence. HOWEVER, there is a large amount of violence and some disturbing scenes...(spoiler alert)...a boy is attacked and murdered, another is crushed by a boulder and his brains are described oozing over rocks, boys poke, punch,and stab each other, several pigs are killed and one has its head stuck on a pole. A fat boy is constantly taunted and called "piggy" and "fatty", some boys go and try to kill another boy, and one goes insane, imagining that the rotting pig head is talking to him. But...other than the violence, the book is awesome. The language is strong in some places but not too bad. This book is ALARMINGLY awesome!!!

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Violence & scariness
Teen, 13 years old Written byTripFoot March 26, 2012

One of the Best Books Ever!

Everything is said in Common Sense Media's review. This book is truly amazing.

This title contains:

Educational Value
Positive Messages
Positive role models
Kid, 10 years old October 12, 2017

Amazing Book, Must Read!

The violence is intense. A kid's skull gets cracked open with a rock, a kid gets ripped apart by spears, and teeth. A pig's head is cut off and put on a stick. Ass is used a few times. Its great though, it shows a message about civilization versus savagery.

This title contains:

Violence & scariness
Teen, 15 years old Written byMariah504 March 15, 2016

This title contains:

Educational Value
Positive Messages
Positive role models
Violence & scariness
Sexy stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking
Teen, 17 years old Written bysdefe7-ifg June 12, 2016

This title contains:

Violence & scariness
Teen, 15 years old Written bycinnagurl February 6, 2013

lord of the flies

I had to read this for school and i gotta say, its not that bad. its better than most books you have to read for school. However, this book is violent so if you are not reading this for school if you are sensitive to gross stuff and dead things i would not recommend it. Its not that bad just fine. Slow in some parts but action packed in others.

This title contains:

Violence & scariness
Teen, 13 years old Written byTwistle December 11, 2017

13 And Up

I'll start by saying this; I'm a kid, and this book is a beautiful piece of literature. And if you have a child who wishes to read it, then I highly suggest you allow them. I say 13 and Up because it takes a certain level of comprehension to be able to fully understand the story and the meaning behind it. From the allegories about society, religion, and politics, to the wonderful (and plentiful) use of symbolism throughout the book, it takes some time to decode all the messages in Lord of the Flies. Now, I'm not saying you have to be quote-on-quote "smart" to understand. I simply mean taking some time to read between the lines is definitely worth it. About the more violent scenes; yes, there are a good amount of bloodthirsty pig hunts and even a few murders here and there. It's a completely reasonable concern for some parents. But, in my opinion, the way these scenes are portrayed is (for lack of better term) 'subtle'. The author uses language that never explicitly lays out exactly what's happening for the reader, which is why some younger children may not understand. If your kid is mature enough to understand the story and the morals attached I highly recommend it. It's definitely thought provoking, and I'm proud to say that's it's the first book to truly change my life. It's eye opening, it really is. Then again I am a sucker for a good allegory. But hey, a modern classic is a modern classic for a reason. And I think if you give it a chance, you won't regret it.

This title contains:

Educational Value
Positive Messages
Positive role models
Violence & scariness
Teen, 16 years old Written byJust1whale December 10, 2016

A good read

It is a well written book, and brings up many moral questions.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Teen, 15 years old Written byJck319 March 30, 2017

Amazing book, violent though.

I had to read this book for school, and I loved it. It was so captivating and such a great written story. I personally would recommend it for anyone over 13, as the story can be hard to follow and some topics are confusing.

This title contains:

Educational Value
Positive Messages
Positive role models
Violence & scariness

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