Parent reviews for Many Waters

Many Waters Poster Image

Common Sense says

age 12+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 15+

Based on 5 reviews

Kids say

age 10+

Based on 6 reviews

age 17+

Many Waters is a Dark Book and Not for Everybody

This title has:

Too much sex
age 15+

Misogynistic

I think this book is a product of another time. I don't see the phrases "an easy lay" and "a slut" as having any place in describing a young woman regardless of her pattern of behaviour. All the angels are male. The fallen angels groom young women to have sex and bare children for them. I'm a huge fan of the Wrinkle in Time series. This book made my skin crawl.

This title has:

Too much sex
age 12+

Not worth your time

Not very good; a book designed to have just enough action to be a story, but is really an excuse for Sandy and Dennys to observe the beauty and budding sexuality of the young Yalith. There was some educational value. This book was biblically and culturally accurate for the most part, and the unique view of the Noah's Ark story was intriguing.

This title has:

Educational value
Too much sex
age 14+
I hated this book sooooooooo much. It was really boring. Made no sense. And will make no sense for anybody.
not rated for age

Great Book for Teens

I am so glad I read this book before giving it to my nine year old due to the "coming of age" theme. It contains several references to nudity and sex between the nephilim (fallen angels) and humans. (This is noted in the Bible as one of the reasons for the flood.) This book is better suited for the teen age group and promotes abstinence/innocence. The twins are not able to ride unicorns if they loose their innocence. One of the boys is regularly tested in this area. It is set in Noah's time period with the twin boys from the previous 3 books at age 15. In the prior books the twins never take part in the action, so it is nice that they get a book on their own. The only drawback is that it was out of place in the time line of the previous books. I loved the biblical tie ins throughout the story with Noah's family. It raises several provoking thoughts about Noah possibly having more children that may not have been let on the Ark (ie a girl Yalith who is taken to heaven like Enoch). Madeline does this by referencing that women were rarely mentioned in the Old Testament. Other children are mentioned that are not allowed on because of their interrelations with the nephilim. Overall, it was a wonderful story with great spiritual content and lessons. It talks of taking out time to be quiet and listen to God talking in the wind. It is a wonderful good versus evil book.