All parent member reviews for Okay for Now

Parents say

(out of 4 reviews)
age 11+
 
Review this title!
Adult Written byTalkative Teacher January 10, 2012
age 12+
 

Inspirational...and entertaining!

Okay for Now is one of the best coming of age books ever written. The author's strong use of allusion (real life events, people and products) paints a vivid picture of the setting of the book. Doug is one of the most humorous characters that I have ever encountered in a book written for adolescences. My seventh grade students loved that Doug was able to overcome so many obstacles in his life. The message that "Working hard has its reward" is throughout the book. I especially liked how Doug worked to overcome his reading disability. He was an inspiration to many of my students
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Parent of a 4 and 14 year old Written bybooks4kids January 4, 2013
age 12+
 

Powerful

The book is very well written. Students would benefit from reading this with the supervision of a parent, mentor, or teacher due to the content. The literary voice is exceptional.
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much consumerism
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Adult Written byCollegiateGirl July 9, 2013
age 10+
 

A Powerful, Deeply-Moving PG-rated Read

• This book, although it deals with some hard things, is very beautifully and tastefully written. One example is that Doug mentions that his father has "quick hands." • I am incredibly sensitive in the stories I read and the movies I watch (most of the movies I own are 'G' or 'PG'), and I not only finished this book, but I even recommended it to my youngest sister, and I am SCRUPULOUS about what I recommend to her. This book contains some of the most powerful messages about overcoming hard things and rising above them, and of letting the pieces be put back together. • Violence: There is a flashback scene where Doug's father takes him to get a tattoo on his back when he (his father) is drunk, and a scene where Doug's brother gets into trouble, and tries to explain himself, but before he could "my father was on him" (NOT in a sexual way) and that is basically the extent of the reference to abuse. Also the fights Doug gets into are explained as statistics: Ex: Stats for lunch: two fights, two losses. Stats for after school, three fights, two losses, one broken up by a teacher. • The book ends on a hopeful note in every aspect. Doug's father comes around, and almost everything is put back together. This story is really a story about a boy who sees his life in Audubon's bird prints, and who overcomes his challenges and difficulties and discovers who he wants to be. It will make you laugh and cry, and I think it is one of the best books to demonstrate how to rise above struggles in the home, and give the people we love time to change. • After reading a story about a subject as penetrating and hard to cover tastefully as abusive family situations, I have come to completely trust Gary Schmidt, the author. That is a rare honor by me.
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking