Parent reviews for The Cat in the Hat

The Cat in the Hat Poster Image

Common Sense says

age 4+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 4+

Based on 17 reviews

Kids say

age 5+

Based on 18 reviews

age 3+
My kids looooove these books!
age 4+
age 18+

This is my favorite Stephen King book

age 2+

This title has:

Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
age 2+

while my other kids were sleeping my 4 year old was having nightmares and I read this to her

my kids love it but while the rest were sleeping my 4 year old was having nightmares and woke up my 14 year old daughter and wanted me to read this to her
age 3+

It's In The Hat

A mother leaves her two children home alone and a stranger shows up and they start doing crazy things. For some people this will raise alarms, but in reality this isn't as bad as it seems. Children can tell the difference between an imaginary cat and some random stranger that shows up at the front door asking to be let in to play. The point is the funny rhymes as well as the funny things that the cat does an it is meant for good entertainment.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
age 2+

This is what started Dr. Seuss' fanbase.

I LOVED this book as a toddler.This book is what encouraged me to take some time out of my day to read.The Cat In The Hat himself is hilarous as heck.The live-action movie on the other hand,is horrible.
age 3+

BEST DR. SEUSS BOOK EVER!!!

I don't really need to make a review on this because everyone knows that this is the best Dr. Seuss book ever made! It is a classic that kids and their parents will never forget! The cat may be a bad role model in the beginning, but at the end, he shows that he has a heart! Clever rhymes, nice pictures, and adorable characters makes this book memorable!

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
age 4+

Children 4 and older will love it!

The Cat in the Hat is very, very Educational!
age 2+

5 Hats out of 5 for the Cat

I love reading The Cat in the Hat to my 2 yr old. We have lots of fun reading through it. The first time through he thought it was too long, but now he asks for each each night before bed. I had previously thought he was zoning out during sections of the book, but a few days ago he was playing off by himself and talking to himself and I realized he was reciting part of the text from one of those sections! Others have expressed concern about the cat and the "things" as role models. You can't explain proper versus improper behavior without examples of the latter to counter with the former. The kids are mostly bystanders, who don't try to stop the cat or the things until pressed at the end. In the end, they take the right action. And, the cat himself, redeems himself to some degree by righting what he has done wrong. The story ends with a question -- that I believe -- is there for you to address when the story is presented and complete: When the mother comes home, should the kids tell her what happened while she was gone?

This title has:

Great role models