Parent reviews for The Hate U Give

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Common Sense says

age 13+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 14+

Based on 48 reviews

Kids say

age 13+

Based on 175 reviews

age 16+

Important book for 16+

Tons of strong language, swearing, sexual,references, adult content. Good for 16+ high school student. Should be part of a discussion group or study...either with class/peers/parents. Issues brought up need to be processed and worked through. Definitely provides one side/view to issues, so perspective, audience and material intention should be made clear to readers. Critical thinking is important. Worth a read for sure... just make sure the reader is mature enough emotionally and intellectually.

This title has:

Educational value
Too much swearing
1 person found this helpful.
age 11+

Excellent Read for parents/teachers and children/students together

I'm a Middle School teacher and currently reading this book with my class. Yes there are a hundred f bombs, mention of condoms, underage drinking, gangs, drugs and violence. Kids need to learn about this while they are young so that when they are older they won't be surprised by such vocabulary and content. Reading it with a teacher or parent will allow the adult to speak truth into the teens life and help them work through any questions or concerns they may have. White out the curse words if you need to but honestly these kids are cursing at school anyway (I know my 12 year old is...not that I like it). Many great pieces of literature such as "The Great Gatsby", "Catcher in the Rye", "The Grapes of Wrath", "To Kill a Mockingbird", "The Color Purple", "Beloved", "Ulysses" and others have content that some parent has complained about enough to get it banned in a school or library. Like those classics, the themes in this book are way more important to dwell on than the foul language and mature content. It teaches kids to stand up for what they believe in. READ it!

This title has:

Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
1 person found this helpful.
age 14+

Hard-hitting view of racist reality

I bought this for my 12-yr olds to read, but being young and sheltered 12-yr olds they couldn't get past the language, so we'll have them try again next year. The day I started reading this was the day that everybody's feeds were filled with Minneapolis Officer Chauvin kneeling on George Floyd's neck until he died, and Amy Cooper lying to the police about being threatened by a (birdwatching Harvard graduated) black man in Central Park (after he asked her to put her dog on its leash). Angie Thomas, Malala Mousafzai, Greta Thunberg, it's time to listen to the young women.
1 person found this helpful.
age 16+

R Rated Book

Parents please be aware: This book has 90 F-words in it that are said regularly and if translated directly to a movie would be R rated. In order to make this into PG 13 movie they were required to have a maximum of 2 F-words and remove the mature content. Parents be aware the book is much more mature than the movie.

This title has:

Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
1 person found this helpful.
age 16+

Excessive Foul Language

This book would have been so much better if it didn't contain excessive foul language on every page. It's unfortunate this this was put in when it's a book directed at young teens and would have been more powerful and reached a larger audience if it wasn't so excessive. These global issues need to be addressed but because of the high language content I would suggest directing this book at older teens. The movie is less offensive as a lot of the swearing had to be removed to maintain PG 13 rating.

This title has:

Too much swearing
1 person found this helpful.
age 16+

MATURE CONTENT - Not for middle school

This book contains mature content ideally directed at high school students or older to read with and adult so they can understand the books meaning and also allow for discussion around the many different perspectives of this important topic. Schools have such incredible influence on students and because this book was written by a young songwriter that used excessive frequent explicit language and sexual content throughout I would use with caution in the classroom. This is Not an ideal book for younger teens as it may give them the impression that this is acceptable behaviour especially when being presented by their teacher. The main theme is THUG LIFE meaning "The Hate U Give Little Infants F***'s Everybody". Students need to be mature enough to understand this main theme . There are 90 F*CK's and a variety of over 200 other words that the author uses for shock value and impact. Lots of chanting of "F*CK THE POLICE" and "MothaF*cker..." . Please take this into consideration if using in the classroom. My hope is that educators find a more appropriate resource to teach the young about global racial issues that create positive change that take create more positive change. I would recommend age 15+ for this book.

This title has:

Too much violence
Too much swearing
1 person found this helpful.
age 16+

First 5 min- cursing, drugs & condoms

Worst commonsense score ever! It says 13 and up but I would say 16. In less than 5 minutes of listening we heard 3 curse words, talk about drugs, grinding, and condoms. Rated it low for that reason only since didn't keep listening. May be a good book, but we will wait several more years to read.

This title has:

Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
1 person found this helpful.
age 16+
The Hate You Give by Angie Thomas is a look into what a lot of black communities go through in the United States. The speaker is a girl named Starr Carter who is sixteen and lives in a neighborhood called Garden Heights. Her friend, Khalil, has an altercation with the cops and ends up being shot. From that point on, there are protests at Garden Heights and legal actions are taken. Throughout the rest of the book, there are themes regarding police brutality against the black community, stereotypes, and racialized poverty. I would recommend this book to anyone older than 16 because this book includes descriptive violence, profanity, and subjects that a younger audience might not completely understand. The only downfall of the book is the limited view. This book definitely has a bias toward one side (against the police). However, one of the main purposes of the book is to bring to light this current issue that the black community has with the police from their perspective. Thus, reading this book could be beneficial to anyone who is not in the black community to see what they experience and struggle. This book is extremely relevant to current issues because of the Black Lives Matter Movement. I recommend anyone to read this book, especially if you want to challenge your views if you do not completely agree with the movement!

This title has:

Educational value
Too much swearing
age 16+

Great Book!!

“The Hate u Give”, Angie Thomas, 444 pages Sixteen year old Starr Carter attends a fancy suburban prep school while living in a poor black community, but her mindset about everything and everyone changed when Starr and her friend Khalil Harris were on their way home from a party after gunshots were fired. The two haven't talked in a while, they are having a great time, Khalil explained Tupac's idea of “thug life” in the midst of great conversation they notice police lights and sirens, they are getting pulled over. The police officers already seem too rough, he then asks Khalil to step out the car and when he checks on Starr he is fatally shot. Starr could not believe what happened, as he did nothing wrong, she soon realizes this was racially motivated. Starr wants justice for Khalil, but no one seems to care. The police themselves said they would not be holding an investigation. Not to mention how everyone is associating Khalil with gangs, and possession of drugs solely because he is black. Starr is the only person who knows what really went down that night, and if she says or does nothing it could tear her community apart. Starr is strong, and intelligent, and does an amazing job at seeking justice for Khalil and her community, one of my favorite quotes from her “I can’t change where I come from or what I’ve been through, so why should I be ashamed of what makes me, me? That’s like being ashamed of myself” ( Thomas 441).

This title has:

Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
age 17+

Language and content alone...

...did not allow me to get past the first few pages. A disappointment, as the story may be an important one.

This title has:

Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking