Kid reviews for Things Not Seen

Common Sense says

Invisibility isn't all it's cracked up to be.
Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 12 reviews

Kids say

age 10+
Based on 97 reviews
Teen, 13 years old Written bysofidomi06 June 28, 2019

A unique view on invisibility!

This was a great book. I like it because it puts almost believable science into the explanation of being invisible. The main character, Bobby, turns invisible (hence, the theme of the book.) When trying to figure out how to turn back, he meets a girl who is blind. Together they risk lots to figure out the mystery.

I don't know why I rated this book as 4 instead of 5 stars. I guess it's because I've read a lot of books, and even though they are really good, they can't all be rated as "the best."

This book doesn't have any inappropriate stuff in it, except for the fact that Bobby has to walk around naked in order to stay invisible. No details described.
Kid, 12 years old June 17, 2019
It's an interesting story. There is some nudity, but when given context, it makes sense. There's some sciency stuff which is fun to figure out with the characters. There is a message that disabled people can still do great things. It's a great book and I definitely recommend it to anyone 10ish who likes sci-fi that isn't about aliens and space travel.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Sexy stuff
Teen, 15 years old Written byJudetheDude December 15, 2016

YUK?

When I read this book, I just knew Andrew Clements and crossed the line. And I'm sorry to whoever wrote the YUK!!! review, because if your an adult, why are you reading kid's books? And you stop reading the book because of an Electrical blanket??? And you're a teacher!! I would fire you on the spot. And whoever said it "read my mind" and "helped me decide" there are 108 more review that say the book is great! Mrs. Di, you are one weird person.

This title contains:

Educational Value
Positive Messages
Positive role models
Teen, 15 years old Written byLydiaC321 January 1, 2016
As you can see from the four stars, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. (I first listened to it as an audiobook, actually. Daniel Passer does an excellent job narrating. ) Anyway, there are several reasons I liked this book.
First, i loved seeing the quasi-transformation Bobby underwent. As a somewhat sheltered ISTJ fourteen-year-old, I was at first put off by Bobby's relatively snarky behavior at the beginning of the novel. He is extremely sarcastic towards the beginning of the story. I typed him as an ISFP (FiSeNiTe), albeit a moderately "cold/intellectual" one. (Coincidentally, Harry Potter is also and ISFP.) Bobby is in no way the hippie artist that Tumblr uses to define the ISFP. I digress, but there is a point to emphasizing his type. His Te function comes out blatant and untempered at the beginning of the story, but toward the end he has learnt that there is a time and place for consideration of the feelings of others. Additionally, the relationship between Bobby and his parents CHANGES. It irritates me how the media generally portrays teenagers as rebellious and sarcastic parent-haters. I was disappointed that Clements apparently chose to do so at the beginning of Things Not Seen, but my disapproval turned to admiration as he skillfully turned the relationship in question around (without preaching!!!). I once knew a person who said, "If you start something crummy, it will BE crummy." I don't subscribe to that philosophy. Apparently, neither did Clements (I know it's not accurate to judge someone based on a single book, but just bear with me). In Chapter One, Bobby's relationship with his parents is indubitably "crummy." By the end of the book, one wishes to publicize the book to the point that it revolutionizes the teen fiction industry, all because of the positive message in Bobby's relationship with his parents.
Second, I found something intriguing about this book during my third or fourth reading. Clements gives no physical description of Bobby. None at all. Wait--actually there is a bit, but that which is present is scarcely enough to give the reader an idea of what Bobby actually looks like. For instance, we know that at the end of the book his hair is "longer." We know that he is "taller" than Alicia. We know that according to Alicia (who, mind you, is blind) he has a "nice smile." I like the vagueness of description in this book. If the reader was told that Bobby was 5'8", had green hair and brown eyes (or vice versa), and was any given ethnicity (one must be politically correct these days), the reader would be tempted to picture a person of that description during the story instead of an invisible person. Also, the lace of description strengthens the connection between Bobby and Alicia, who due to her blindness has no idea what he looks like.
Third, I was captivated by the intensity of the mental description. It was startlingly impressive. In Chapter Seven "First Night", Clements does a fantastic job capturing the essence of pure dread. Note to parents: If your child frightens easily, I would not recommend that you allow your child to read Chapter Seven (or listen to it--again, Daniel Passer reads almost too well). However, it is nowhere near as horror-filled as some of the other books in today's teen literature, which i call another bonus. At first glance, one would not call Bobby a highly emotional person (one reason i was reluctant to type him as a Fi-dom). It is there, though. Hidden behind his inferior Te bluntness is a bedrock of Fi sensitivity. Once i started paying attention to things other than his constant sarcasm, I was shocked at the intensity of his emotions.
Speaking of Bobby's emotions, there is one component of this book about which i am still attempting to form an opinion. This component is the relationship between Bobby and Alicia. It is developed more fully in Things that Are, which is told from Alicia's perspective. It is interesting to see the similarities between Alicia's and Bobby's thoughts. Their relationship starts out as an ordinary friendship, although from the start there is an undertone of "something more," i.e. a romantic relationship. Clements writes for the most part as though Bobby is the primary one who desires there to be some sort of romantic element. However, in the last chapter, Alicia sends Bobby an email which reveals much about Alicia's emotions concerning Bobby. Anyway, in comparison with the majority of teen literature, their relationship is pure and does not escalate too quickly. There is not much of the stereotypical "Oh, s/he is attractive, I shall therefore attempt physical romantic interaction with her/him." Bobby's knowledge of Alicia's physical beauty is present, but it is not the driving force of the relationship. And PRAISE THE LORD there is no love triangle in this book. Ninety-nine point nine per cent of those are unnecessary and detract from the plot. While the relationship between Bobby and Alicia is superior to most other teen romances i have read, I still have one slight qualm about it, that being that it is a teenage romantic relationship. Most (I only use "most" to avoid saying "all") teenage relationships are merely two persons acting on a mutual infatuation. I'm not certain i approve of Clements endorsing that (if indeed he is endorsing that). However, it was interesting to enter the brain of an infatuated person--I'm fairly certain that I've never undergone an infatuation, so now i have some idea of the thought process. On the whole I'm not entirely sure i approve of the message. However, as a "ship" it is far better done than, say, Percabeth. (And yes, fangirls, I did just go there.)
The other uncertain aspect of the story is that for a decent-sized portion of the book, Bobby walks around in public without clothing. This aspect of the book is the one thing that makes me hesitant to recommend it. I'm not fully certain what the moral implications of this are--is it right to do something wrong if no one will see you? However, the reason society imposes standards of modesty is because after the Fall it has become clear that for obvious reasons people must be to a certain extent covered up. Looking at the situation in this light, Bobby is fully "covered up" by his invisibility. He does not continue his habit of exiting the house unclothed after he can be seen again. Another way to look at this issue: if someone wore a full-body suit that caused invisibility and left the house in it, would there be any problem? Obviously not. The same principle applies here. In a way, Bobby behaved FAR more modestly than many teenage females today. I believe those who say Clements is endorsing public nudity have not thought their opinions through completely (or just used different logic). I could be wrong, but what i find to be reasonable logic points to the contrary.
All in all, Things Not Seen is a rather excellent book. I suggest that parents skim this book, particularly chapters 7, 9, and 28. Also, decide beforehand whether or not you want your child to read the two other books in this series, Things Hoped For and Things That Are. While the quality of writing in those books is on par with Things Not Seen, the subject matter is moderately more sketchy.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Kid, 11 years old August 6, 2015
I read it for my summer reading book and I though the book Things Not Seen was a great book! It had a great plot and a good relationships between the characters. In the book Bobby suddenly becomes invisible and quickly discovers the consequences of his case. Can he get back to normal? Read the epic book of Things Not Seen by Andrew Clemets!

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Teen, 15 years old Written byCutegirl101 February 25, 2013

Awesome

It is a good and positive story. I think anybody from 9+ should read it. It's really interesting too.

This title contains:

Educational Value
Positive Messages
Positive role models
Consumerism
Teen, 13 years old Written byArthur Setiawan November 19, 2012

Things Not Seen ! Two Thumbs Up!

This book, one that you should all read. This book inspired me to read more and more and more on anything. I wasn't quite a reader some years back, until I found 'Things Not Seen' that made me fall in love with reading.
Arthur Setiawan - Indonesia

This title contains:

Positive role models
Kid, 10 years old October 22, 2012

sucks

this sucks

This title contains:

Educational Value
Teen, 16 years old Written byww2ellis September 20, 2012

clements101

great.! the best book ive ever read!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Teen, 13 years old Written bylivelovesoccer7 August 16, 2012

Best Book Ever!!!!!!!!!!!!! :)

I loved this book so much! At first i HAD to read it for my summer reading, but the more i read the, the more i wanted to read. And let me tell you i am not the biggest fan of reading but this book happened to turn out to be really fun and interesting. SO TRY IT!!! I GUARANTEE YOU'LL LOVE IT!!!!!!!!!!!

This title contains:

Educational Value
Positive Messages
Positive role models
Kid, 12 years old January 6, 2012

read it now!:D

when i read this book i fell right in it.It is awesome and very unexplainable. Very intresting and also very detailed.Every book has to be full of detail and has to have enough dialog to support the story and this this book has exactly all of this.But it is also very positive.
Kid, 11 years old December 29, 2011

LOVE IT, LOVE IT, AND LOVE IT!

so, i sined up for a reading challange at my school and they always pick lame books, so when i got the book, "things not seen," i thought it looked completely dumb. but then i started reading it, and i was like, oh my gosh, this is the best book i have ever read in a long time (thats saying something, because i am very critical when it comes to books)! i highly recomened kids 10+ to read this book immidietly! you will be happy you did.
Kid, 10 years old October 3, 2011

things not seen

avery good book some inaproprite things but uther wise a good book

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Teen, 17 years old Written bydaddysbusy September 16, 2011

The best book

It's the best thing I ever read, I think that you can learn how is important to appreciate every second of your life and how a part of the book sais: Not only look at the mirror to remember how you are and that's all. Just.. make me cry.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Teen, 13 years old Written byErinscan September 11, 2011

Don't Waste Your Time

I'm sorry to anybody who enjoyed it, but this has to be by far one of the worst books I've ever picked up.
Teen, 13 years old Written byBlueDancer June 29, 2011

parents its a ood book

this book is great!!!!! im 12 and i have read alot of books in my life and this has to be one of the best!!!!! and ok parents he walks around the world naked so what its not like ur kids r going to do that!! its a book! but its a great book i hope u will read it :)
Teen, 13 years old Written byAthena Keene May 6, 2011

Perfect For Tweens

THis book tells the story of an 'invisable' boy who meets someone with an 'invisable' world. Together Bobby and Alicia cope with the blankness of the [email protected] and mysteries in life. And with hope and re-newed confidence they find a cure.

This title contains:

Educational Value
Positive Messages
Positive role models
Teen, 14 years old Written byreader21 April 20, 2011

Great older reader book, but good younger reader book

This is a very good book for children 10 to about 17 years of age because Bobby is naked most of the time and kids 9 and under may be disturbed by that.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Teen, 13 years old Written byrobinrunner March 31, 2011

Not the best book in the fantasy school, but not the worst either.

It's okay. Forgive me if I miss something because I haven't finished the book yet. I know so far that the H word is said by the invisibe boy's (Bobby's) father. Bobby gets naked in public a lot so no one can see him, but still. This includes one time where Bobby takes all his clothes off in a library and goes to a floor where a bunch of teenagers are to try out his new abilities. Bobby also desrespects his parents by going against thier orders and sneaks out of thier house, but learns his lesson when they get into a car accident and could have gotten killed. There are a few moments before that where he disobeys his parent's and talks back to them. He even threatens to run away and makes his mother cry.

This title contains:

Sexy stuff
Language
Positive Messages
Teen, 14 years old Written byAnimeXD February 3, 2011

Cute book for 10+. Cute relationships. Invisable + Blind XD

This book is very cute and all. It shows the main character, Bobby, the invisable boy, who becomes friends with a blind girl. The blind girl, Alicia, tries to help Bobby. As the story goes on, their relationships becomes stronger. The relationship is very cute.

This title contains:

Positive Messages

Pages