Kid reviews for Monster Hunter Stories

Common Sense says

Buddy up with fantasy creatures in fun RPG spin-off.
Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 15+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 11+
Based on 2 reviews
Teen, 14 years old Written bySariaTheDragon May 30, 2018

Good Game

This game is one of my favorite 3ds games, though it does have some violence when fighting monsters since some of the items you can gain are the bones or meat of the creature, and a couple of the outfits for the female characters are a bit revealing in the legs but you don't have to choose them if you don't want to. There are a couple of 'scary' monsters and one that is missing an eye , but there is no gore/blood whatsoever. (Spoiler:) About 3 or 4 monsters 'die' or get hurt in the later game but they leave in non violent ways, and one of the characters' family member dies in a cave in. It does show positive friendship building with the companion monsters and the main character's friends in the story and helping animals. Overall it is a great game, just perhaps not for under 10 (E+10 rating on box).

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Ease of Play
Violence & scariness
Teen, 13 years old Written byOguriCap_05 July 27, 2018

Monster Hunter Stories Review

Monster Hunter:Stories is an RPG with a light-hearted yet thought-evoking adventure story. It places the player in the eyes of a young child in a village where the characters raise monsters, calling them "monsties" (monsters+besties). The player sets out on a journey, with plenty of new things to discover (including the astoundingly amazing graphical quality; Just about everything benefits from the chosen art style, and it looks really nice for the screen res). *-----------------------------/paragraphbreak/----------------------------- The game focuses on both friendship and exploration. There are lots of monsties to collect by way of befriending their offspring, who hatch from the eggs you pilfer from the larger, less friendly monsters' dens. Additionally, you can rescue these little adorable collectable pig-like creatures. Some sections of the story are friendship-centric. -----------------------------/paragraphbreak/----------------------------- The vocabulary used in the game ranges from relatively complex (**catechizing and placid) to simple (curious and still). The more complex vocabulary terms' meanings can usually be inferred from context (Catechizing Felyne is very inquisitive, monsters described as placid are, well, placid), and when not, there's always the OED. (Absolutely no developmental or educational hinderances in teaching your child how to use a dictionary.) -----------------------------/paragraphbreak/----------------------------- While there is fighting in-game, it's less like brutal warfare, and more like rock-paper-scissors. There's not any blood, nor any truly devastating special attacks (they are mostly rather comical, actually, albeit epically comical). The monsties' special attacks are activated by winning the rock-paper-scissors-like attack system enough times, which fills up your character's soul gem. Each monster that you battle has an attack patten, which helps you determine which rock-paper-scissors option you should choose next. Additionally, each monstie has field moves, which they can use to affect some things in the ginormous environment. The monsters do appear to die when killed, as in, they fade away. I would say that it does have a weak amounts of violence, but it does not have too much violence. Some monsters are a bit scary at first, but they are all displayed as creatures you could possibly be friends with if they hatched from a different egg. -----------------------------/paragraphbreak/----------------------------- Some of the items are indeed monster remains, but they are not particularly specific, and do not have graphic graphics, as the item icons in the game, while they do a phenomenal job of distinguishing items from one another, are not particularly on-point and accurate to their real world counterparts. -----------------------------/paragraphbreak/----------------------------- Note: The parent who gave it such a high rating may have been trying to review the other, possibly less kid-friendly games in the monster hunter series. Monster Hunter: Stories is almost entirely kid friendly. -----------------------------/paragraphbreak/----------------------------- Please do use your own judgement, too. If your (young) child reacts horribly to tense moments, BBC nature documentaries, or cartoon monsters, you may not want them to play this game. Additionally, if they adore dragons, monsters, a cartoon art style, exploring new worlds, or collecting, I would definitely recommend this game. You could also enjoy it as an adult. -----------------------------/paragraphbreak/----------------------------- *Common Sense Media doesn't support paragraph breaks, but that also makes things more difficult to read. Thus, alternative paragraph breaks are needed. **This word, as one of the numerous cat puns, may have been stretched a bit. In-game, it has no religious connotation.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Ease of Play