Parent reviews for The Sims Social

The Sims Social Poster Image

Common Sense says

age 15+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 15+

Based on 6 reviews

Kids say

age 13+

Based on 8 reviews

age 18+
age 10+

This title has:

Easy to play/use
age 13+

An expansive, if shallow, simulation of a life without consequences. Teens and up.

First, the good stuff. The game does reinforce some positive values and habits: "hard" work (home and yard cleaning and maintenance), saving money, cultivating friendships, setting and achieving short and long term goals. Plus, most of the game relies on rudimentary reading ability. Now the cautions: The game has some displays of light violence (like slapping an overamorous suitor), and there is alcohol consumption for those who seek it out (many booze-related items in the shop around New Years Eve, for instance). Sims Social has a lot of playful sexual suggestiveness. All nudity is hidden with a mosaic, and sex is referred to in innuendo, but it doesn't take much to figure out what sort of activity "woohoo" is. You can woohoo in the shower, the bed, the jacuzzi, and you can only woohoo with your lovers and ex-lovers. Mutual player consent is required for a woohoo-possible relationship, but not for each encounter. Once the relationship-status is green-lit, accessing woohoo at a friend's house is no different than watching their TV or eating from their fridge. It's a perk, and never shown to have any consequences or related responsibilities. As an adult playing this casual game, this is a fun fantasy notion, but families should talk about these sorts of issues before allowing children to play the game, or supervise the play so they can talk about how relationships in the game are like and unlike the real world. Finally, a major issue for me with the whole Sims series, but especially Sims Social is that it's almost purely materialistic. While there is a side theme of self-improvement, all self-improvement in the game is managed by the acquisition of new consumer items for the home. A beginner's stove allows you to cook a dozen recipes. To master new recipes, you don't buy a recipe book-- you need to buy a whole new stove! And there five to choose from, each more expensive than the last, and the elite ones requiring real world money to purchase. Want to meditate or do yoga? Buy the Yoga Mat. Want to write a great novel? Make sure you bought the right typewriter or word processor (there are five of these as well). Yes, the game encourages saving up and practice-makes-perfect, but to accomplish anything you must constantly be spending Sim-money or begging for gifts.

This title has:

Great messages
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much consumerism
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 18+

Inappropriate

I played Sims Social for a couple of months but decided to quit because of the inappropriate sexual content. In Sims Social, you can flirt and have romantic relationships and I found out later on that avatars can have sexual relationships. I was stunned. I really didn't expect to find that in the game. First of all, because it's on Facebook and is very public. Second because graphics are really good, it helps you be creative and really looks like an innocent game. Fighting with other avatars is also rewarded so players go fight with as much avatars as they can to get a reward. Same thing with romantic relationships. I'm just afraid how playing this kind of game could affect the perception of kids and teens regarding sex and relationships. If flirting, romantic relationships, and sex could be done easily and without responsibility involved, I think it isn't a good example for kids to follow... or an environment to get exposed to. If for the creativity part, Sims Social is definitely good...but for character-building, I wouldn't recommend it for children and for everyone else.

This title has:

Too much sex
Too much swearing
age 18+

Inappropriate for children of any age.

Let's start with some European statistics: 38% of 9-12 year olds have a profile on Facebook. 40% of children are connected to people online that they don't know in "real-life". 9% of children have gone on to meet someone in "real-life" that they first met online. We see from these statistics that: a) Age limits don't work and there are millions of underage users on Facebook. b) Some children will connect with people that they don't know putting themselves at risk. c) Some children will accept an invitation to meet up in real life following online interactions. When playing "Sims Social" players can interact with other users in a lot of different ways, but they are rewarded for entering into romantic relationships with other players. These romantic relationships can develop quickly into sexual relationships, with options to have sex in different locations, including the bedroom and the shower. Sex between players is rewarded with "social points" which are then used to advance within the game environment. I have the following questions for the game developers. Isn't sex for rewards called prostitution? Surely encouraging and rewarding sexualised behaviour between "avatars" encourages underage "offline" relationships of an inappropriate nature? Would parents be happy if their kids were having "cybersex" in a chatroom environment? How is this different? Isn't there a risk of "Sim Grooming" where kids are connected to strangers within the game environment? Is there a risk of bullying when 2 players enter into a same sex relationship? Shouldn't sexual behaviour within the game be limited to those above the age of consent for similar behaviour in "real life"? When these questions are answered, I may review my opinion of the game. As it stands, I feel that the game is highly inappropriate for children of any age and that by not restricting sexual activity within the game environment to adults only, Playfish, Electronic Arts and Facebook are behaving in a wholly irresponsible manner.

This title has:

Too much sex
age 14+

A Sims game for 2011!

I love the Sims Social because I get to make my own home, purchase items, and visit my neighbors.

This title has:

Educational value
Too much swearing