Parent reviews for A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood

A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood Poster Image

Common Sense says

age 10+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 11+

Based on 29 reviews

Kids say

age 10+

Based on 20 reviews

age 10+

The kindness of Fred rogers in extraorianary. Great film for families

Tom hanks is unbelievable in it. Fred rogers is so kind to everyone. No matter how big all small. Parents will adore Tom hanks in it. So many positive messages and role models.

This title has:

Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
age 9+

Helps show the value of talking about our feelings

Demonstrates the power of looking for the good in others and they will see the good in you.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
age 16+

Lots of values in a non-kid attracting set up

The movie is full of great deep values but it’s done in a way that does not attract kids. Small kids could not follow through and teenagers did not want to continue watching. The age rating is not accurate because small kids could understand it better if it wasn’t done in this boring way that does not attract the viewers. Small kids would have hard time understanding the complexity that this movie brings
age 8+

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
age 11+

Tom Hanks isn't the Mister Rogers from 1968, but this is not as good, but still OK.

So, this movie is a sad movie itself. Some characters die, and there is punching and some swearing. Some drinking is in this. There are a lot of messages. Fred Rogers was a hit when he made Mister Rogers' Neighborhood in 1968. This show ended in 2001, and shortly after in 2003. Fred himself died. Fred Rogers had been missed for years. In 2018, we got Won't You Be My Neighbor?. This still wasn't for many kids, due to being boring and some sad parts. This was just a movie about Fred's life. When this was released in 2019, it still wasn't so good for young kids, like the 1968-2001 show was like. I still really hope we get a Mr. Rogers movie for young kids, just as fun as the original show. I feel older kids were happy to see this, but younger kids didn't have the chance to see Mr. Rogers since 2001!

This title has:

Great messages
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 10+

Not as much friendship as the original Mr. Rogers, but OK

It is fine. But I don't think it would be matching with the amazing Mr. Rogers.

This title has:

Great messages
age 9+

A Beautiful Day Anywhere

I’m sceptical when approaching movies along these lines and if you are also, do yourself (and everyone around you) a favour – just watch it regardless. There are many scenes in this pic that go to places very few movies, especially today’s, would dare to. That doesn’t exactly mean the moviemakers have been honest enough to tell the whole story of Fred Rogers and his remarkable personality but, where they do go --leads us to find out more for ourselves-- so that’s a good thing. The unusual sets are used with great success as stepping stones to other parts of the story - creating a better than might be expected connection to the real-life situations. What was to be expected is that democratically weighted PC Hollywood - shows little interest in exploring where Mr Roger’s sensitively-tuned philosophy was born. Here, he’s mostly presented as a humanitarian who wants to make the world, and our relationships within it better for us all...but there’s more to this complex TV personality than they care to explore. Apart from this, ‘A Beautiful Day’ is modern movie making at its finest and most meaningful with well-realised performances throughout. There’s another story about the time this real-life man, who, while being presented with an Emmy, dared to tell Television to ‘shut-up’ (in a nice way) and take ten seconds of silence, to stop screeching on about its own blindness to its own worthlessness - and spare a thought for all the real people, who during their developing years helped it/them become something better. Of course, Mr Rogers was talking about thoughts and feelings many would now, no longer recognise or understand - especially when you look at the endlessness of its mostly soulless, fake-reality. This is certainly a man finely tuned to understanding our own reality. Should engage most audiences as it puts up a mirror to our own relationships and how we deal with them. One of the year’s best for people who want more than simplistic action flicks, and for those who still know how to extract the very best that movies about intelligent people might have to offer.
age 13+

Movie is less about Mr. Rogers and more about a miserable reporter

Just to sum it up: lots of death, sadness, arguments and family fights.
age 15+

Heartwarming movie brilliantly acted

To British audiences Fred Rogers is unknown therefore it was a pleasure to make his acquaintance in this warmhearted movie. Rogers hosted a TV show for kids from 1968 - 2003 and became an American icon. He was a Presbyterian minister who took to television to show children how Christian morality could make a difference for the better. The movie is inspired by a true story and although part is fictionalised, much of the events actually took place one way or another. Hanks is superb as Rogers, capturing the easy, guru-like manner which completely disarms the hard-bitten, cynical, but troubled journalist, Lloyd Vogel (a great performance by Matthew Rhys) sent to interview Rogers. As so often in Rogers' interviews, it is the interviewer who unravels and the movie is fascinating in its complete lack of cynicism. Why? Well it's actually inspired by the 1998 article "Can You Say ... Hero?" by Tom Junod, published in Esquire. Script and direction first class. A must for all but the cynical. Or maybe it might even do the cynical good! As to age, I have put 15+ as although there is nothing objectionable, the message may well be lost on younger children.
age 16+

Absolutely not for kids! Great for adults.

This is a movie concerned with mature emotional themes regarding parental abandonment, anger and dying. It’s a great film for adults and possibly very emotionally mature teenagers. Not a kids film!