Kid reviews for Alpha

Common Sense says

Boy, wolf face intense peril in epic prehistoric adventure.
Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 28 reviews

Kids say

age 11+
Based on 13 reviews
Teen, 14 years old Written byKmartinez31417 August 18, 2018

Aalpha is such a heart warming film!

I love this movie, I really enjoyed the movie as a whole. There was not one thing I didn't like. I watched Alpha with my dad at the movie theater I can't believe I didn't hear about this movie it was amazing it really does deserve more praise. It was such a heart warming film that shows the love of family and of friendship.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Teen, 13 years old Written byCAJ310 August 22, 2018

Liked it

The movie was very good but there were subtitles. I didnt find the movie innapropriate but some of the scenes are a bit disturbing.
Teen, 13 years old Written byRachel2 August 17, 2018

Good movie

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Violence & scariness
Kid, 12 years old August 24, 2018

Great movie

This is one of the best movies I've seen in 2018. The animation for the animals is over-the-top awesome; There's a ton of peril and suspense. Be prepared to read subtitles through the whole movie. This is recommended for tweens and up.
Kid, 9 years old August 22, 2018

Alpha: A Journey of Survival and Friendship

The new movie Alpha is a simple story, based on an extremely well written screenplay. It’s about a young man named Keda, who is separated from his tribe while hunting. On his journey back home, he bonds with a wolf and they travel together. Keda names the wolf Alpha. They both have to face the weather, predators, starvation, and wounds. There’s a lot of violence and the movie isn’t in English. (The language is unknown.) There are some disturbing scenes that might scare little children. For example, Keda gets thrown over a cliff; a tiger eats a member of Keda’s tribe; Keda gets trapped under a frozen lake. Overall, Alpha is worth watching but don’t bring little kids. Read more reviews by me! I’ve written a review for Darkest Hour, Black Panther, Christopher Robin, and more!!!

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Violence & scariness
Kid, 10 years old September 3, 2018

Great movie about the hero's journey, may not be for younger kids

The movie Alpha, shows the story of bravery, courage, and commitment. There are great positive role models and great positive messages, but a bit too much violence. Of course the usual, punching, grabbing, kicking, and a bit of dark scenes where some tribes will beat each other up, to show who is tough and who is not. Blood is shown off screen, as so is any other gory scenes, but, there are some very scary and depressing scenes (including the main character) involving EXTREME peril; not for viewers who are disturbed by very "INTENSE" scenes, e.t.c... there are some very dramatic parts to the film where a boy falls from an extreme height, a bull charges at another character and hits him, leaving the character with blood and scars, another scene where the main character is holding on to the edge of a cliff, then slips off; no harm is done. Another scene where a teen is grabbed/taken by a lion (no blood is shown, although there are screams and chomps, the sound of bones being crunched), another time where a character is running away from a group of hyenas, another scene where an animal is shown with blood and marks/deep cuts on it. There is also scenes of illness; a character spits up blood, and another intense drama scene where a boy is trapped under water/stuck beneath a thick lair of ice, but, no deaths... although the violence, this movie is more for kids 15 and older!

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Violence & scariness
Kid, 12 years old August 27, 2018

violent but beautiful

alpha was a very beautiful and heartwarming story about a boy and a wolf who become inseparable friends. though it is quite violent and there are many subtitles. I would recommend this movie but only for kids over 11 or 12

This title contains:

Positive role models
Violence & scariness
Teen, 14 years old Written byDouglas Mitchell November 18, 2018

Breathtaking visuals, in boy and wolf survival story.

After being separated from his tribe, a young boy must learn to survive, and fight his way back home, while also making a friend with a wolf he names Alpha. Now let me just say for the record, that this is a beautiful looking film. The visuals and cinematography is breathtaking, and really adds something to this film that most movies today lack, and definitely boosted up my rating for it. The story is also very good, and tells a great story of survival, and the bond the boy makes with a wolf. This is truly a story of man’s best friend. The acting is pretty good. However, all the dialogue is done with subtitles. As for some content to worry about: This film could be hard for animal lovers to watch. A heard of buffalo are ran off a cliff, and blood can later be seen on the ground, as well as their corpses. A tiger kills a man offscreen. We do hear him scream as the tiger eats him. A frozen dead man can be seen. Some animals are killed offscreen for food. A wolf is shot with a bow and arrow and roasted over a fire. Some other scenes of perl. As for Nudity: A boy can be seen skinny dipping in a pool. However, no nudity is seen. He is also shown in his underwear a few times. No language whatsoever. So overall I think this is a great movie with amazing cinematography and a great story that really shows the true meaning of man’s best friend! Reviewed by Douglas Mitchell. Violence: 6/10 Nudity: 3/10

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Violence & scariness
Kid, 10 years old October 19, 2018

Great movie

No English words in movie all subtitles the subtitles were moving fast to hard to read. A lot of stabbing and discussing images some injuries not for kids under 10 and maybe 11 year olds GREAT MOVIE

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Violence & scariness
Teen, 13 years old Written byS.G_13 September 25, 2018

Touching story involving dogs

This movie stood out in many different ways. First of all, the movie was in a native language, with English subtitles underneath. It touched me in many different ways, since I do have a dog at home. There is some violence and blood, but nothing to extreme. I recommend this to 11+.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Violence & scariness
Teen, 17 years old Written byPipeCine November 14, 2018

Albert Hughes' conventional enemy-become-ally survival tale is one of the most disappointing movies of 2018

Sold as the origin of the relationship that changed humanity forever, Sony Pictures' and Studio 8's pic is an atypical drama hybrid that never takes off or defines itself because of some downy editing techniques, the overly light, straightforward underpinning and a monumental deception on the making of iconic pictures that blame blatant artificiality jam-packed with ostensible visual effects. In recent years, American majors have taken a clear stance— trade strategy —on the pet-centric drama game. They've settled to produce, at least, one flick with our doggy friends in all posters; some productions were rewarded, others punished. Last year, Universal Pictures took its turn, kicking off the year with a firestorm of controversy ahead, either the misleadingly edited video alleging animal abuse or a dark narrative approach on reincarnation and euthanasia; even with all that, dog-lover filmmaker Lasse Hallström's "A Dog's Purpose" was an unexpectedly profitable hit for everyone involved. The same cannot be said for most of the preceding movies. In 2016, Annapurna Pictures produced "Wiener-Dog" by Todd Solondz, a four-fragmented film that flopped at the box office but wowed most critics who saw it at the Sundance Film Festival. It would be unfair to overlook Illumination-Universal's fiercely blockbusting "The Secret Life of Pets" directed by Chris Renaud and Yarrow Cheney, receiving a mixed response from critics, but enjoying overwhelming box office results, generating over $850 million worldwide. In 2015, the once-revered film company Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer released "Max" by Boaz Yakin, whilst the indie company Magnolia Pictures blazed to true victory with "White Dog" by Kornél Mundruczó, the former, even with its melodramatic war background, was a crashing box office and failed to find an audience, whereas the latter became one of the hardest-to-watch films of the season; despite that, the saddest part was the fact of, after its limited theatrical premiere in some film fests and North America, went straight to VOD. It's nonsense to clarify those awkward dog-exploitation entries that don't help this genre in the least, distasteful products just for kids who don't think about it, to take one example: "Robo-Dog" by Jason Murphy. 2018 is no exception. Opening the 68th Berlin International Film Festival and premiering worldwide in late March, this film isn't only one of the best films of the year, but also one of the most important and bold film events for stop-motion. Maestro Wes Anderson's beautiful animated canine political love letter to dogs and Japanese culture deserves a better spot, a better list, hence "Isle of Dogs" has no place here. Rather, big-budget survival "Alpha" is this year's winner to be part of this list of dogs and humans. More in the vein of Lasse Hallström's tearjerker "Hachi: A Dog's Tale" and the most common American adventure/survival films, this pic uses up its striking possibilities in no time, by opting to insert inorganically moments of dramatic construction in the midst of the protagonist's ceaseless nightmarish experiences. Daniele Sebastian Wiedenhaupt's script is uneven and whimsical, laying bare its only hook: its arty will that uses Ice Age ferocities to shine. It inaccurately depicts hostility and dangerousness from nomadism only through visual devices, forgetting the key role a good introductory storytelling plays, which, by the way, is abrupt and synthetic kicking off right in a pivotal moment. What's next is a snappish, out-of-place, hurtful timeline switch to end in the starting point once again, which it solves with a fragmented sequence in a disturbing and shameful way that trashes the small narrative construction. From then on, Keda, the main character, will trace his way for survival; and the rest is history. Even so, the father-son relationship is the heartbeat of the first act, the empathy thread that involves the viewer in the journey, which helps to appreciate a good character design and a couple of great performances. It's hard to imagine the transition from ferocious predator to friendly ally in the context the film navigates, therefore the wolf-human relationship must be a slow, naturally layered progression, no catalysts breaking that process. Although the script tries its best, loses focus when it clumsily inserts either some action sequences or unfunny moment. At the end of the day, one would expect such a relationship to be stronger, more real and much more credible to do justice to the kind of ancestral tale and demographics it's dealing with, sadly, the only thing the film's cliche close achieves is to become a huge missed opportunity. Why isn't it a silent film? A bit of a let-down it feels to hear the very first quote, as one would imagine the film is about to attack with all its originality. "A Quiet Place" has revived somewhat silent film in its own way, then, why not? You're right, Krasinski's thriller is a heart-stopping, clever monster movie, whereas Hughes' pic is a manipulative drama, which certainly makes harder its purpose; even so, idealizing this offering, balancing the modern and the traditional, we would be in front of a unique work. You're in a fine mess, firstly, if you put the best of all your movie into a two-minute-plus trailer with better edition than the whole film, and, secondly, if your distribution company delays release date nearly six months in search of a more appropriate, strategic opening weekend. The first time I saw its official trailer was just before seeing a Sony Pictures film, and oh man, that was a great ride, being fully absorbed by the magnificence and grandeur of Martin Gschlacht's images. Some seconds after, I was wowed and excited about what, at least visually, the film would be. Don't expect more than some specific stunning landscapes and one or two gorgeously designed frames, the "guaranteed" top-notch visuals are severely affected by digital effects you see with half an eye, it's outrageous to know the only real thing on screen is the actor. Many of the pictures with chances for memorability were degraded by an incisive, painful artificiality. Atmosphere, in this kind of film, is a key feature, even if C.G.I. is constantly all over the place, for this reason, the feeling of defenselessness and latent danger in the first half of the film is sensitive regardless of veracity, immersing the viewer in the experience thanks to beautiful lighting and some tremendous computer-generated imagery. Its action set pieces aren't particularly unforgettable or originally powerful, with the exception of a couple of arresting, sincerely symbolic sequences at the start and end of the film. "Alpha" by Albert Hughes — his solo feature directorial debut— got moviegoers' hopes up with the flood of marketing pledges, after seeing it, it's no more than a futile epic survival ride that relies heavily on a committed direction and a great performance by Kodi Smit-McPhee, a few visual shocks and the hook any film with a snout in its poster gets for free. A film that gradually gets stuck with fast-and-hollow entertainment, one that fails to break the spell flying over dog-centric drama films, one with no pedigree.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Teen, 14 years old Written bydianaarken September 29, 2018

Very unique, but not exactly for me

This movie is pretty unique compared to the movies being released today. Although there is some dialogue, a lot of the story telling comes from the breathtaking visuals. But to be honest, this type of movie wasn't really for me. It just didn't feel like something I would enjoy. I know that others would like this visual, atmospheric type of storytelling though. The violence wasn't that gory or bad at all.

This title contains:

Violence & scariness
Teen, 14 years old Written byRaven B September 24, 2018

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models