All parent member reviews for Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed

Parents say

(out of 3 reviews)
age 10+
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Adult Written bycrackerjack5 January 21, 2010

A must-see for every biology student!

Ben Stein does a wonderful job exposing the biases that exist in educational institutions over science. Little kids will be bored, but it is an excellent movie for middle-schoolers and up. There are some graphic scenes of the Holocaust that are pretty disturbing, but nothing bad other than that.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Parent of a 14 year old Written byTsion July 9, 2009

Provacative and Stimulating, A Must-See!

This movie is perfect for family discussion. Not only is it extremely well-made, it is very thought-provoking and stimulating. There is no language, sex, or onscreen violence, only some tense images of the Holocaust. The positive theme of asking questions and looking for truth is promoted, and Stein is always respectful to whoever he's interviewing, whether they agree with him or not.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Parent of a 6 and 8 year old Written byArt Expressions March 31, 2009
This is one of the best if not most thought provoking movies in a long time. Extremely well executed and filmed. I have not only bought it but am currently loaning it or showing it to many others. I let my young children watch because although there may be issues touching on sensitive subjects such as the Holocaust, it is reality and history they should understand at whatever level they can and more importantly they need to understand the root motivating factors that allowed such thinking to exist and actually be deployed in plain view of the World. It brought many many topics up that the movie just began to touch on such as the sheer enormity of the engineering mechanics that become more and more complicated the further we delve into a single cell. We started discussing the parts of the cell and it's mystery as to how even an atom shouldn't technically exist due to negative and positive neurons existing in the same space... this should be impossible. They should cancel each other out... what holds them together to form an atom? Look up the 'atom smasher' on the internet to see what I mean. Researchers are desperately trying to discover the elusive puzzle piece that has been (funnily enough) the 'God Particle'.