Kid reviews for Fiddler on the Roof

Fiddler on the Roof Poster Image

Common Sense says

age 10+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 9+

Based on 8 reviews

Kids say

age 7+

Based on 20 reviews

age 9+

Poignant film, but very boring story; terrible dialogue and script

Fiddler on the Roof is a 1971 film based on the Jewish people living in the shtetl. Although the movie is mostly about marriage and Jews, there is some violence within the movie. The Russian soldiers start attacking the Jews with swords. Some can be seen lying on the ground, dead. Tevye shouts a lot. He says “his daughter is dead to him” after she marries a non-Jewish man. There isn’t any language, but shut up is said once. There’s no sex, except some kissing and flirting. Tevye and Lazarwolf get drunk. This film is not very good, and I would recommend it to anyone.
age 2+

Stupidest dull musical with terrible annoying acting

Parents need to know that this all white cast stars in a extremely old boring musical called fiddler on the roof which i hate. It is a musical but i was forced to watch it for school, this is extremely boring and terrible acting, like they can get extremely annoying especially the main character his voic
age 12+

Best musical ever

Fiddler on the roof is a history musical about the life of a Jewish community of a pre-revolutionary Russian village. The are a few drinking scenes and a poor milkman determines good husbands for his three daughter. If you don't like musical I wouldn't watch because it's 3 hours long

This title has:

Great messages
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 7+

Beautiful Musical

This is a great musical film about religion, tradition, and the breaking of that tradition. It can be quite humorous at times and the characters are mostly kind and good. It touches on some hard topics, but children can watch it.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
age 7+

WORST MOVIE!!!

Very boring. No action. I couldn't make it through the halfway point. DON'T make your kids watch this. That's an hour and a half I'll never get back.
age 10+

Good musical

Has good music and messages. It has some minor go over your head till you get to tall jokes. Younger children would be bored through the movie. The worst part is when some characters get drunk at a wedding.
age 11+

Intimidating but enjoyable musical

This film is largely entertaining mainly because of the memorable and catchy tunes, although its run time may not do much to endear it to some viewers. Mature themes are dealt with here, such as Antisemitism, devotion to one's religion and, to a certain extent, Communism. Don't get me wrong: the film deals equally with universal themes such as community, friendship and first loves. There is also character depth here: the central character of Tevye is depicted as both warm and hearty and stubborn, suspicious and desperate to preserve tradition. But if you are a fan of musicals and haven't seen this one, this is not to be missed,
age 10+

A Powerful Musical That Still Makes Us Cry

Dear Young Men out there, fun fact, it is okay to cry in movies. You don't need to worry about it. Anyways, back to my review. Fiddler on the Roof is probably one of the best films that I have seen. Simple, Powerful, Emotional, this movie truly delivers all the goods. With tear-jerking, uplifting, and amazing songs, this film is one of the best musical films ever. Tevye is an amazing role model, willing to sacrifice so willing to sacrifice a lot. There are some emotional scenes involving religious persecution, that should make even the most experienced film lovers depressed. In the end, the film teaches solid messages about family, love, tradition, love, friendship, and hope. A standing ovation goes to Fiddler on the Roof.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
age 12+

"Fiddler" brings the Jews back into an accepted light.

“Here in Anatevka, we have traditions for everything: how to sleep, how to eat, how to work, how to wear clothes. It's a tradition, and because of our traditions, every one of us knows who he is and what God expects him to do” says Tevye (Topol), the Jewish village milkman in pre-revolutionary Russia. He believed that they were still God’s chosen people, as God said in Exodus 19:5b (KJV), “…ye shall be a peculiar treasure unto me above all people.” A “tradition” purist, he, prejudiced against the foreign Russians as they intermingle with them in Anatevka, wishes to marry out his three older daughters. “But would it be heresy on my part to suggest that "Fiddler" isn't much as a musical, and that director Norman Jewison has made as good a film as can be made from a story that is quite simply boring?” asks critic Roger Ebert. As much as I respect him, I disagree with him here. The story is not about marrying out his three daughters, but instead about Tevye’s controversial decisions in those marriages that alter the Jewish life in their village. In the end, the Russians drive out these Jews in a pogrom; it is not a key point of the plot, but an indirect effect of the generations-long Jew discrimination. The truth that it teaches doesn’t lie in the history, but perhaps in the way Tevye impacted Anatevka’s history. Faithful to the Jewish traditions, Fiddler is an accurate portrayal of Jews that can both entertain and educate without stark preaching. Perhaps the greatest openly-Jewish/Christian movie made by mainstream Hollywood, it deals with the various differences in the peoples and the ignorance of Tevye of the outside world. But Fiddler doesn’t preach; it presents the message throughout the entire film’s two hours and fifty-nine minutes. The “teachable” moments don’t come in one cheap, blink-and-you-miss-it line, but instead through Jewison’s smooth storytelling and direction that sinks the message comfortably in. This gradual separation from tradition comes in the form of his daughters’ husbands. First, instead of accepting the village matchmaker’s choice of husbands, they love and know their selected mates, an alien concept to Tevye. Second, these desired husbands’ ideas and positions push the borders of tradition one at a time, with the eldest marrying a tailor in the village, the second a Revolutionist and the third, a goy. Tevye, quickly though a bit reluctantly accepts the tailor, he is skeptical but consents to the Revolutionist, but he altogether rejects the goy. He feels the change happening. He can’t avoid it, yet, at the same time, he still can’t fully accept it. Based on the hit, still on-going Broadway musical, Fiddler won three Academy Awards for sound, the clever use of cinematography and John William’s adaption of the score. The witty dialogue, catchy songs and the wise-guy Tevye brings the Jews back into an accepted light.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 9+

this is good!!!!!!!!

A good film to watch with your family