All parent member reviews for Kirikou and the Sorceress

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Parents say

(out of 6 reviews)
AGE
6
QUALITY
 
Review this title!
Parent of a 6 year old Written byapisurtica March 1, 2013
AGE
4
QUALITY
 

Precocious compassion and problem solving

This may be the most revered of films I have watched with my child! The film is so beautiful to watch and listen to, and the pacing gives lots of opportunities to be still and listen; it encourages the patience and attentiveness not fostered by so many children's films. It's also a good glimpse into a way of life that may be in some ways very different from our own. There's educational value in learning about another culture and how resources are used/shared in rural villages. I am absolutely blown away by the strong messages of compassion and resilience that this movie has helped me share with my son. Kirikou is born, or rather births himself, and is immediately asking questions. His mother is patient and nurturing, but still firm and honest with him. The parent-child dynamic they model is heartening. Precocious Kirikou is not satisfied with the oversimplification of Karaba the sorceress' character. (He later uncovers a subtle message that it's more about truth vs fear or ignorance than good vs evil.) What's more, he not only seeks to solve Karaba's evilness, but is able to see beauty in her despite her cruelty and greed. As Kirikou encounters challenges, we are let in on his problem solving processes, including his feeling tired, scared, etc. We see him persevere with indomitable optimism and courage, but also a solid understanding of who he is and what his limitations may be. SPOILER: Karaba's evilness and magical powers both stem from a thorn once forced into her back (a possible allusion to rape?). I constantly refer to "thorns" that people might have that cause them to make bad or mean choices. As my son matures, we discuss ways that we, like Kirikou, might help ourselves and others to resolve the underlying causes of our pain and sometimes subsequent bad behavior. It's been a gift to have this poignant metaphor to discuss such deep themes with my younger child. The illustrated nudity in this film is refreshingly respectful and non-sexual, though I see how Karaba's body jewelry might be surprising. Our family did not find it distracting. A child who's experienced breastfeeding and seen little kids naked won't see anything shocking. Also, there's a sequel: Kirikou and the Wild Beasts. I think yet another is on its way.
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Parent Written bykamikazecook April 29, 2012
AGE
3
QUALITY
 

Inspiring and humorous story of magical child (with great music)

This is an utterly winning film with a child protagonist who knows what he wants and doesn't let anything stop him, from the first moment when he calls out "Mother! Give birth to me!" to the last moment. He is paired with a mother who encourages him to be his full self (her answer to that first demand? "Any child who can talk from his mother's womb can give birth to himself"). The impossibly tiny Kirikou has the smarts to ask the questions the adults aren't bothering to ask and to look farther when they don't have substantive answer. Even more than his bravery, it's his curiosity that win the day, and there are many great lessons for kids and adults in this lovely story. For kids, there's the pluck of a kid even smaller than themselves; for adults, there are the adorable details (the shape of a child's body when he's being nudged away, the way the grandfather holds the tired baby, the very way that Kirikou is bold one moment and wants to be held the next) that let you know this film was made by people who are loving parents themselves. I label this as 3+ simply because it moves slowly enough that someone under 3 might not be able to keep focused on it—but there's nothing a younger child couldn't see, and the "scary" moments are over quickly. There is one moment when Kirikou appears to have died—you might want to let sensitive children know ahead of time that no real harm comes to him. There is animated nudity (bare-breasted women and naked young children) that is accurate to the film's time and place, but do not let it deter you from watching this sweet and utterly heart-warming story that will truly entertain and charm the whole family.
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Parent of a 3 and 5 year old Written byMamaRo May 17, 2012
AGE
5
QUALITY
 

A bit scary for age 5

I personally didn't think this would have been that scary for my 5 year old daughter. She is usually in line with other Common Sense Media ratings. She was enthralled and into this film. I walked away for a few minutes and then found her crying out loud with tears streaming down her face during the scene where the children are captured by the tree. We did need to mute this film during scary parts. Overall, I think she liked it and I appreciated the artistic style and the folkloric style. But I would say this is "iffy" for age 5 and better for kids age 6+.
Parent Written bymamantx January 20, 2013
AGE
10
QUALITY
 

Be prepared to explain the nudity

This is an interesting story, but contains a great deal of (culturally appropriate) nudity, including the featured sorceress with jeweled nipples.