Parent reviews for Lucy

Lucy Poster Image

Common Sense says

age 17+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 13+

Based on 18 reviews

Kids say

age 13+

Based on 43 reviews

age 15+

Very Intresting

I love science. However, the movie has more violence than anything else so I just put 15 plus to be safe.

This title has:

Educational value
Too much violence
age 16+

Entertaining and interesting

I really enjoyed this movie. But it was not something I would feel comfortable watching with my 12 year old daughter. It has a lot of violence, blood and drug references. The story is entertaining and offers some interesting hypothesis about how things might be if we used 100% of our brain capability. but not to be watched with younger kids.

This title has:

Too much violence
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 15+

Silly Darwinian Philosophy Theory sold as Science and Truth.

It's insane that our intelligent actors and writers of our day still pawn this evolution philosophy, teaching that endless amounts of time - billions of years - results in natural selection. This dear children, is not science, but an accurate representation of the stupidity of naturalistic philosophy, proving that man has not evolved into someone 'more clever' than predecessors, because our elite educated remain simpletons to this day. Evolution is an old message from the 1800's which today has been proved scientifically impossible due to scientific findings like: irreducible complexity, first and second laws of thermodynamics, and genetic entropy to name just a few. I applaud the fact that the directors did a great job in keeping the fowl language and nudity out.
age 8+

Lucy

I think that this movie is completely appropriate and fine for any kid to see but younger kids may not get it and maybe a little scared so you should keep it ages 8+
age 12+
age 15+

Unimaginative, excellent cast wasted

Overworked idea- the ridiculous old fashioned notion that we "only use 10% of our brains" that we've seen several times (Limitless, Dead Zone, Transcendence, Phenomenon) glossed with sex, and rhinestoned with pseudoscience. I'm especially dismayed by those who don't remember any sex scenes- there's a detailed scene where the main character is tied to a chair and spreads her legs to tempt the guard closer to rape her so she can kill him graphically. It's a very tense and unsettling scene.

This title has:

Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 18+
age 12+

This title has:

Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 12+

Cool idea, undeveloped story

I am in my mid forties and watched this movie with my fairly mature 12 year old son. My son was captivated by its images and ideas; he closed his eyes during the surgical parts and during a flashback scene when a professor-lecturer (Morgan Freeman) recounts that memory/legacy is carried on through reproduction. In this case, it is the sort of reproduction that one might see at a zoo - only in this case, it is several consecutive scenes all at once. Not offensive per se, but the kind of thing that would cause a 12 year old to look away and say, "gross". The movie succeeds on the idea of: "is there a way to tap the unused potential of the human brain? If so, what would that look like?" That's a mighty cool question and could lead to quite a story line. Regrettably, the screenwriters did not find a way to tap into that idea through the discovery of some ancient hidden formula, an undiscovered plant or place, something from space, or even something from science. Instead of letting us uncover an imaginative mystery like that as participants, the writers decided they needed to make us observers of drug trafficking and human mules. And now because drugs and smuggling and profiteering are the subtext for the discovery of the portal that opens human brain capacity, the subsequent violence, control, and manipulation that surrounds the drug trade "fits". Sadly, the narrative of drug smuggling (and all that comes with it) in many ways overcomes the narrative we really care about: what does untapped human potential really look like? Intriguingly, one of the talking points that parents and parents (as well as parents and kids) ought to have after seeing this movie relates to what happens to the main character: The more knowledge she has, the less she feels - and feels human. Her newfound and heightened awareness helps her to sense everything, but the more input she knows, the less capacity she has for empathy. As she notices this in herself, she ALMOST grieves its loss; but she has lost that capacity with the heightened data awareness she has. Perhaps this is why every parent and teen OUGHT to see it in order to have the conversation: The more information one has, the less human one may become. The more one is tuned to stimulus and input, the less able one may be to empathize. Connection(s) is different than relationships. This movie gives some effective talking points for these kinds of conversations.
age 17+

Junk Science Subtracts From the Enjoyment

I could not sit through this movie without squirming through its junk science and cannot recommend this movie because of it. The premise of the movie revolves around the myth that we use only 10% of our brain. That, of course, is not true. If somebody gets shot in the head, you never hear the doctor say, "The good news is that he was hit in the 90% of his brain that he isn't using." As such, the very idea that one could bend time, space, and reality by awakening some dormant chunk of brain matter is just embarrassingly ridiculous. If you are like me and enjoy movies that play off the suspension of disbelief, then this movie just doesn't cut it. The very premise of the movie is so removed from how things actually work that suspension of disbelief becomes impossible. No amount of cool effects can safe this one.