All parent member reviews for The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

Parents say

(out of 72 reviews)
age 9+
 
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Parent of a 5 and 7 year old Written bysaltycrew November 21, 2010
 

Should be fine for younger audiences with discretion and discussion...

We debated about letting our 5 and 7 year old watch this movie, but went ahead and let them. There were some questions about how it was possible they got to Narnia through a wardrobe and the battle scenes at the end were a bit iffy... But they LOVED the movie and have since watched it again and again. Definitely a family favorite now! Just know what your child can handle scare-wise and be there to talk with them about it.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Great messages
Great role models
Parent of a 4 and 9 year old Written bychris27w January 6, 2011
 

Excellent movie!

I just watched this movie for the first time today and I really enjoyed it. It is a beautiful movie. It is, however, a little violent and even frightening in a few scenes. This movie depicts the power of love/family,friendship and forgiveness. Older children will understand the movie's themes and not be as frightened of the battle/death sequences as those under the age of 9/10 may be.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Great messages
Adult Written byViaMarguta51 April 9, 2008
 

A Wonderful Fillm! Just watch out for Mr. Tumnus

For anyone who has walked into a wardrobe in hopes of finding Narnia, and for those who have yet to discover this enchanting possibility, this latest film version of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe will be a treat. With the same care that Walt Disney and Walden Media used with Louis Sacher’s Holes, they have created a faithful adaptation of another, if much older, classic The story itself is exciting, magical and surprisingly uncomplicated. Warning: SPOILERS AHEAD. It follows the adventures of Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy Pevensie, who walk through a wardrobe and find themselves in Narnia, a land where they are destined to rule as kings and queens. Currently under the control of the White Witch, in Narnia “…it is always winter but never Christmas.” Narnia is inhabited by mythical creatures such as fauns, centaurs, tree nymphs and talking beasts all of whom are excited by the rumor that “Aslan is on the move”. Though mistakes are made along the way, the children and beasts work together to see that good triumphs over evil so that everyone in Narnia can live at peace with the full range of yearly seasons. This film sticks fairly close to the book, keeping in all the important and favorite scenes. Being a relatively short novel, some welcome embellishment was added. The movie starts with a World War II air raid on London, giving an opportunity to present key character traits of the children and offering an explanation as to why they end up living in a mansion in the English countryside. It also sets up the dilemma faced by both Susan and Peter (the eldest) about getting involved in a war in Narnia, when they are trying to escape one at home. There is also a scene in which the children are trying to cross a dangerous river. It is the first of several tests of bravery and good sense which Peter must face on the road to becoming the High King. These are just two examples of how the filmmakers bring a little more insight into the story. The acting throughout this film is superb, especially among the 4 children. Lucy, the youngest, is perfectly cute and sweet, but in no way cloying. Edmund is completely annoying and rotten in the beginning and yet is so believably happy at the end that it is so easy to forgive him. Susan’s character is given much more dimension here than in the book. She is not only motherly, but intelligent and questioning. There is even a bit of foreshadowing regarding her role in later books, when she often comments about wanting to be safely back at home. Peter has at once the most common and the most complicated role. There are many stories of an ordinary man who must become a leader, and this actor brings freshness and honesty to Peter’s emotional transformation from big brother to High King. Many well known British actors fill out the rest of the cast. As the White Witch Tildon Swinton is cold, commanding, and at times, just this side of sensual. Her greatest feat, however, is in dealing with her costume. The large and stiff dress looked as though it were made of paper-mache and prevented the actress from comfortably keeping her arms at her side. Liam Neeson, of course, was perfectly cast as Aslan, the noble Lion. His presence itself brings comfort to any film. The CGI lion, however, left something to be desired. CGI will never truly work until the technicians become actors and put emotions into their animation. Rupert Everett is completely charming as the double-agent fox. Dawn French as Mrs. Beaver is lovely as she welcomed the children and bantered with Mr. Beaver. The Professor, played with wisdom by Jim Broadbent who has just the right glint in his eye to hint at things to come. The only casting choice that didn’t seem quite right was with Mr. Tumnus. The young man is a brilliant actor to be sure and certainly embodied the role a faun. Mr. Tumnus is the first citizen of Narnia that Lucy meets and the two become fast friends. As he is 100 years old, he should be played by an older man, preferably dressed in a tweed jacket. But this is a young man, bare-chested except for a bright red scarf. He invites Lucy to tea and parents may feel the urge to scream for Lucy not to go. The moment he confesses he is kidnapping Lucy, is utterly terrifying. As he utters the famous line “… he’s not a tame lion, you know” at the end of the film, the look he gives Lucy as they hold hands is no less creepy. When watching the set-up for the great battle, one might be apprehensive. It looks as though it will be yet another Weta CGI extravaganza reminiscent of the Lord of the Rings. The sequence of hundreds of minotaurs and hags vs. hundreds of centaurs and fauns is kept mercifully short. The costumes are very colorful and the sky sunny and blue. Watch out, however for the occasional view of a disgusting orc. Be careful of the final confrontation between Aslan and the White Witch. The battle is over; she is defeated and wounded. Aslan looks down at the Witch and her eyes grow wide with fright. The director should have stopped there; the overwhelming goodness of Narnia and Aslan being the cause of her death. But in one horrible image, the screen is filled with Aslan’s enraged head, jaws wide in attack. What can only be assumed is that he either bites her head off, or slits her throat. Either way, it is a gruesome thought. Aslan is better than that. Much has been said about the underlying religious themes of C.S. Lewis’ story. In this film as in the books, they are there if one looks for them. But then, it is true of many stories that a deeper meaning is present. The film is not overly Christian and in fact, takes great pains to avoid it. When the children receive gifts from a kindly, bearded old man in a sleigh, they address him only as “sir”. Even the man’s costume is not festive, but rather bohemian. Comparisons may also be made to past films of the Chronicles of Narnia, but to say one is better than another is difficult to do. C.S. Lewis created a world so compelling, so irresistible, and so positive, that print, celluloid or digital, it is hard to go wrong. And it is always good to be reminded that a whole, wonderful world might just be waiting for us behind a closed door, if only we have the faith to open it.
Adult Written byPrend1 April 9, 2008
 

I was creeped out

My husband wanted to buy this for our kids so we went out and got it. My kids fell asleep before they could watch it so my husband and I decided to while they were sleeping. The opening scene was way too much. I also felt that it encoraged kids to leave with strangers. It just went from bad to worse. I had nightmares all night after watching this movie. The witch is creepy and it even shows her killing the lion. Children are given weapons to fight with....my list of gripes could go on all night. My husband enjoyed it so we are keeping it but my kids will not be watching it.
Adult Written byHarry Potter 1 June 8, 2013
 

Very Faithful to C.S. Lewis masterpiece

The lion,the Witch,and the Wardrobe is a quality movie that is a worthy addition to the fantasy genre. With a few changes,this movie is pretty faithful to the book. Now,from a visual point of view,this movie gets the job done. The wardrobe itself is fantastic and the snowy Narnia Lucy enters as well as the battlefield at the end are well captured. The animals,especailly the beavers and Aslan look pretty realistic. The storyline flows along pretty nicely. It is somewhat slow at the start,but never to point of dragging and once they are in Narnia the story flows on wonderfully. And I liked Georgie's performance a lot. She NAILED Lucy. The Journey into Narnia,the epic battle,and the coronation follow the book pretty well. 1 change I didn't like was when they edited out the "Deeper Magic From Before the Dawn Of Time." and replaced it with a "different interpretation " of the "Deep Magic." This makes it sound as though the "Deep Magic." played a role in the rise of Aslan,when in the book,it was clearly the "Deeper Magic." that allowed him to rise. That's the 1 change I felt was untrue to the spirit of the book. On the other hand I liked the way the started the movie. In the book there's just a small line saying the children had been sent away during the war. I like the way they made the filmmakers actually SHOWED this as opposed to just telling it. By actually showing this scene,the filmmakers captured the emotional state of the children in a way the book didn't. You really understand by the time the children are at Professor Kirke's house that they are not on vaction,but are really going through some very tough times. All in all,the journey of the characters (Edmund,Peter,Susan,Lucy,Aslan,Etc.) is well captured by the film. Parents should be aware that this movie starts with a bombing scene,includes an intensely sad scene of children being separated from their mother,and has a fair amount of violence for a PG film. Although PG is probably the right rating for this movie overall,the epic battle at the end comes close to being on a PG-13 level. Preschoolers and kindergarteners are probably better off skipping it. For kids in grades 1-2 I'd suggest parental guidance. Kids in 3rd grade and up should be able to cope with the Lion,the Witch and the Wardrobe. All in all,the Lion,the Witch,and the Wardrobe is pretty faithful to the book and is a quality movie. Sex/sexuality: None at all :) Language: No profanity. A few idiots and shut up is used once. The 1 out 5 is accurate. If the worst language in a movie is one use of shut up then that's VERY mild. Drugs,alcohol,and tobacco: No drugs or alcohol. No cigarettes but there is one scene of Professor Kirke smoking a pipe. The 1 out of 5 is accurate. Emotional intensity: 2 out 5. Not too much throughout the movie. But the "death" of Aslan is pretty emotionally intense ,especially for viewers watching the movie for the first time. Violence: The 3 out 5 is accurate. The movie opens with a bombing scene and the battle between the witch's army and Aslan's army is quite loud and violent with a lot of sword violence. . However,there are no guns in this movie and the violence is non gory and non graphic. Rating: The PG is accurate but it's on the high end of the PG scale. Absolutely off for: Toddlers,preschoolers,and kindergarteners. Absolutely okay for: 3rd grade and up. What to take into consideration when deciding whether to let a 1st grader or 2nd grader watch this movie: Is the child sensitive about animals? If the answer to this question is yes then wait until the child is in 3rd grade. As long as the answer to this question is no the 1st grader and 2nd grader can see this movie. Parents may want to explain about the smoking scene that people used to smoke commonly but that because we are more aware of the health problems associated with smoking it's much less commonplace today. How faithful is to the book?: 90% Positive role models: Lucy is kindly,truthful,loyal,and will put doing what is right above doing what is easy. Peter has great bravery. Positive messages: The message about forgiveness is fantastic. I love how Peter,Susan,and Lucy still love and embrace Edmund as "our brother" even after he had clearly wronged them. The story of Edmund also provides a good message that a person can change and become a better person. Anything else:This review says this movie is okay for 9 and up. But amongst kids ages 15 and under by far the smallest difference between two years is between 8 and 9. Anything that's okay for a 9 year old is also okay for an 8 year old.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Adult Written byAndy9Lego June 24, 2012
 

Do not under estimate the power of movie magic!!! (and history).

I'm almost 10. I saw this movie when I was 8 with my friend and he is a little younger then me. We were freeked out by the WWII bombing of london. maybe because we watched it on a projector and the bombers were actual size. but no. to days ago I watched the first 10 seconds then fast forwarded until they got into there shelter. it should be rated PG-13.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Adult Written bymrsrobinson97 April 9, 2008
 

More Intense than I Expected

I saw this movie opening weekend and it was more intense than I had expected. Good story, great moral with heavy subject matter. I am not a huge fantasy fan - but I enjoyed the movie.
Adult Written byramonatime April 9, 2008
 

Good Story

I love the story behind the movie. Some parts are a bit too scary for the younger kids but it's a definitely good movie and story to show the 8 and over kids!
Parent of an infant, 6, and 6 year old Written byjakeandjonathansmom April 9, 2008
 

Outstanding !!!

I was familiar with the basic premise of the movie but am one of the few who have NOT read any of the Narnia books. I had an anticipation for how the movie was interpreted and was not disappointed. My 4 year old twin boys wanted to see Aslan and did not leave the room for the entire length of the movie. My husband and I paused the film before the killing of Aslan and explained what was going to happen and the parallels between Aslan and Jesus. My boys were jumping up and down yelling for Aslan to "take care of the bad people" and understood that just like Jesus, Aslan would rise again from the dead. Awesome movie !!!!!
Adult Written byveggietalefan April 9, 2008
 

LOVED IT!!!

This movie is very good. It goes along with the book ok. Disney could have done a better job with that. BUT, on the other hand they made the characters pop and come to life. Much better than the 1970's version. I would advise not to take anyone under the age of 8 to this movie. There is a lot of scary animals and a lot of fighting. At the end a battle happens and a lot of people die. But other than that it is fine for anyone.
Adult Written byclarence August 5, 2015
 
What other families should know
Too much violence
Parent Written byMarine Musaelian May 1, 2014
 

This Movie is so great i mean i love it its the best

This film is not violent except in one scene when edmund juts dies and the medicine wakes him up its just a genius movie
What other families should know
Great role models
Educator and Parent Written byAllen Wang April 5, 2013
 

Narnia: The Rate of Movies

I Think, The Movie Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch And The War drobe is A Good Film And Some Violent Scenes Such As War And Langua ge And So, Parents Please Be Always Strict And Protect Your Children Fro m Violence, Language, Consumerism And Positive Message! Thanks!
What other families should know
Great messages
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Too much consumerism
Adult Written bycourtwork March 6, 2013
 

Excellent movie

I think this movie is awesome for kids 10 and up. My son and I watched it together and really enjoyed it. I think it would be too intense for younger kids. The cast is excellent, the special effects are amazing, and the story is brilliant. We have not read the book. I recommend this film whole heartedly for anyone 10 or older.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Parent of a 6 year old Written bymadsmooney1214 June 6, 2012
 

the chronicles of narnia the lion the witch and the wardrobe

Families can talk about the bonds among the four siblings, as they comfort and provoke one another while away from their mother and fearful about the war. How is Narnia a fantasy born of this combination of supporting one another and concern about their future? How do the animals and creatures in Narnia represent different aspects of the children's daily lives -- their courage, fear, and desires? Families might also discuss the Christian iconography in the film.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Parent of a 6 and 8 year old Written byrunner26 April 6, 2012
 

Great Christian teaching for Teens

great positive story. Need to be much older and possibly a church going family to understand the story under the story.
What other families should know
Great messages
Parent of a 11 year old Written byMissKookie May 22, 2011
 

Great movie with a positive message

Very nice movie with a lot of positive messages. It can get a bit scary at times, but not much. Overall, it is not really that violent, just be sure to watch it with your child and discuss the movie afterwards.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Adult Written bysarahkay89 November 20, 2010
 

Great family movie! Loved it.

I really loved the books, so I am a little prejudice against the movie, but I think it was a really great drama. Sweet story, some good action. Nothing inappropriate for kids...except it may be too violent for the very young. Highly recommend. (But I recommend reading the books more!)
What other families should know
Too much violence
Great messages
Great role models
Parent of a 2, 3, 5, and 8 year old Written byJLarsonRN September 5, 2010
Parent of a 8 and 11 year old Written byAimeeblue June 13, 2010
 
What other families should know
Great messages

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