Parent reviews for The Gods Must Be Crazy

The Gods Must Be Crazy Poster Image

Common Sense says

age 11+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 12+

Based on 8 reviews

Kids say

age 7+

Based on 3 reviews

age 13+

Ok

Unlike the listing says, there is a lot of cultural nudity in the beginning including many topless women. So be prepared. There is also some language like GD, bloody, bastard,hell but not a lot. I watched this as a kid and didn't really remember it except that it was funny. It was funny but not as much as i remembered.
1 person found this helpful.
age 7+

A Gentle and Lighthearted Film, Combining Easygoing Comedy with a Unique Sociological Viewpoint

The Gods Must Be Crazy is a very sweet, kind-hearted comedy, back from the pre-South Park days when comedies were able to be sweet and kind-hearted (nothing against South Park itself, mind you). It tackles some darker themes and contains intense, in concept, story-beats, but it's such a breezy film that even the climax, which involves machineguns and child hostages, keeps you engaged but never makes you fearful. It contrasts a wise and observant Bushman against "civilized" people who he interacts with on his way to the edge of the world, which he is trying to reach to rid the world of a Coke bottle; this sounds like a joke, but the movie's opening sequence (which I would refer to as an extended Prologue, rather than a First Act) smartly shows how the bottle, because of its beauty and versatility, has caused their society's first real inner-conflict, as it made people, for the first time ever, wish to have something and refuse to share it with the others. The title 'The Gods Must Be Crazy' is in reference to this, as rather than seeing this as an evil act by their gods, the Bushmen see it as a clumsy miscalculation on their part (their main observation being that the gods only sent one). And while the movie has various plot-threads, the one of the main Bushman walking to the end of the Earth is the main one. Fortunately, the movie does not go for the easy fish-out-of-water gags, such as the Bushman being on a city bus or trying to interact with a phone or radio, the film wisely keeps things in a rural setting, and keeps things on a small an intimate level. There are plenty of gags, most visual, but none are to the Bushman's expense, the closest exceptions being when the narrator explains how the Bushman is processing the oddities of modern technological human (like where he sees a slow moving car, and describes it as "a most strange animal, whose legs moved round and round instead of up and down"). There are no intense emotional beats (like him coming across many bottles in a bin, and being mortified), and the hardships that he experiences are shown to be grueling, but not at all crippling, or enough to break his spirit or determination. Probably the best thing about this movie is that the main character of the Bushman is not only smart, but he's actually the most level-headed, with technological humans shown to live a life that is equal parts better and worse than his; they have more comfort and convenience, but the complications of it are exhausting. And he, along with the other main heroes, do part ways on a very positive note of good-will. In a sense, the movie is telling us that both are good, but maybe the proud members of technological society should take a queue from the Bushmen, who live happier lives simply due to the lack of day-to-day headaches. This film is a great watch for kids, as the comedic beats are done perfectly in ways that will make them laugh, and the darker, more serious aspects are those that they will discover when they watch it older, adding a layer of depth. In a sense you could say it works in the same way that Robocop does, but in the opposite way: Robocop is a movie that attracts kids because it has robots, guns, explosions and swears, and it's only when they get older that they realize that it has a bigger message - The Gods Must Be Crazy is exactly the same, only instead here, kids love it because it's high-energy, wacky and has a carefree tone, hiding a bigger message underneath.

This title has:

Educational value
Great messages
age 10+

More language and violence than I remembered

Relatively tame but more violence and language than I remembered. Strange that the official review says no language because there's plenty.

This title has:

Too much swearing
age 18+

Nudity, clothing disasters and mild profanity

The beginning of the movie shows tribal woman’s breasts many times and a woman who has multiple clothing disasters showing her in her underwear on several occasions. We could have skipped all the bare chests and wardrobe malfunctions and it would have been good for the whole family. The scenes with the truck had us rolling.

This title has:

Too much sex
Too much swearing
age 10+

Gods must be crazy

Good and funny movie probably laughed 1000 times.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
age 6+

Definitely charming and fun. Some issues with violence and stereotypes

My 8-year-old said something about walking to the ends of the earth and I experienced a flashback to this childhood favorite of mine. Successfully dug it out of iTunes for family movie night. It was totally fun — with a couple issues. Kids enjoyed the movie a lot. They loved the sight gags, they learned things about culture and life of the San people in South Africa (see related culture issues below). The plot kept them engaged, they both got something out of the messages — question the need for material things, prize humane interactions and harmonious relationship with nature over all. Yes there is that shooting in the beginning, I had them close their eyes for it. It wasn’t an issue in my family but I could imagine some kids being upset; recommend skipping over that scene if that’s the case, just explain what happened. Watching this 1980 movie from the lens of 2018 does raise some questions in my mind about stereotypical portrayal of the roles of black and white people, and also men and women. The San people are called Bushmen — and described as childlike. There’s a pretty and fairly helpless female lead who needs rescuing all the time. The movie as a whole is a sincere effort (I think) on the part of the filmmakers to be liberal minded (1980s version), but you certainly could have a discussion with kids before/after about stereotypes to make sure everyone is watching critically. Reading on Wikipedia after watching I learned this movie was super Low budget, made locally in South Africa, that was a surprise international commercial success, which I think is interesting. It’s a totally charming film in many respects, I would give it two thumbs up, just keenthe above caveats in mind and address with kids as appropriate in your family.

This title has:

Great messages
Too much violence
age 13+

Scared my 10 year-old

I have fond memories of seeing this movie as a teenager. My 10 year-old son seemed intrigued by the breasts of the African tribeswomen, but the terrorists shooting up people brought him to tears. My bad. We stopped watching. We'll try again in a few years. Also, plot set-up may be a bit slow for modern audiences.
age 15+

OK

This Film Contains some Cultural Nudity, of a Females breast's ( No Sexual way). Expect some PG Violence and very mild language ( one use of bas**** and other mild profanity). My rating Pg-13 for some Cultural nudity and moderate Violence.