Parent reviews for Working Girl

Working Girl Poster Image

Common Sense says

age 16+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 14+

Based on 3 reviews

Kids say

age 16+

Based on 5 reviews

age 14+

Working Girl - a romance with a good moral.

Melanie Griffiths plays Tess, a secretary who just can't hold a job, most recently after giving her misogynistic boss a telling off. She gets a new job where she finds her boss is a woman her age who promises that their working relationship will be one of positivity and growth. On her birthday ski trip, her boss breaks her leg leaving Tess to her own devices. Tess discovers the supposed godsend of a boss was planning to steal her idea. Tess sets out to claim what is hers using her knowledge of the world around her and falls in love along the way. Warning: Minor nudity throughout. Time stamps: intersexism/cissexism 11 minutes in, infidelity and graphic sex/nudity 29 minutes in, misogynistic compliment 35 minutes in

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
Too much sex
age 15+

Good

Some Nudity

This title has:

Too much sex
age 14+

You know you've had a boss like this.

Someone who stole your ideas, used you to advance their career, and did everything to keep you from getting the credit you deserve. I think of him every time I watch this movie, and although he got his come-uppance, as such people usually do, this one is still more satisfying. Griffith is a little annoying as the giggly secretary with ambition, but it works. Weaver is the greatest comedic villain since Cruella DeVil. You know she's going to fall, and she does in more ways than one. While she's mending broken bones from a ski trip, her secretary finds a memo capitalizing on her idea the boss had pooh-poohed as a "secretary's notion." In her boss's absence, Tess (Griffith) uses her boss's name, her office, her home, even her clothes, to break into the rarefied New York mergers and acquisitions world. She even falls for the boss's boyfriend. Alas, the boss is a fast healer and comes home early. She finds an entry in her secretary's day planner, and it hits the fan. It's hard to believe this gem was written by the same writer who inflicted Meet Joe Black on us, but we can forgive him. Harrison Ford is at the top of his game as the boyfriend, but Joan Cusack almost walks away with this one, as usual. Joan is the best comedic supporting actress around. Weaver has one of the the greatest one-liners of all time. When asked if she's sure her boyfriend will propose, she says "We're in the same city now. I've indicated I'm receptive to an offer. I've cleared the month of June. And I am, after all, me." The go-go 80's may be long gone, along with the power suits, the BIG hair, the Perrier, and the bull market, but this hilarious and heartwarming comedy still works without relying on nostalgia or sentiment!

This title has:

Great messages
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking