Parent reviews for Daria

Common Sense says

Biting social commentary has mature themes.
Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 12+
Based on 12 reviews

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 21 reviews
Adult Written byPHS_Togusa April 30, 2014

A definite must-watch for teenagers and adults alike.

This is one of those shows that both adults and teenagers can really get a lot out of. With all the vapid programming for teenagers permeating every corner of television these days (like 16 and Pregnant, Degrassi, and other such TV shows), Daria offers a different perspective on what life for a (junior) high school student is like.

One issue that parents tend to have with Daria is the way that adults are portrayed. They're portrayed as either clueless, condescending, unhelpful, or some combination thereof. The thing is, when you're in (junior) high school, most adults generally DO come off as such. This is something that a lot of parents who lodge this criticism against the show seem to forget. The story is mostly being told from Daria's point of view and not from an adult's point of view. If the story was being told from Helen or Jake's point of view, then all the teenagers and children in this show would be portrayed as how most adults would view a teenager or a child.

The major problem that some people will have that start watching Daria is the titular character's constant deadpan voice (and it does get tedious if you watch the entire show in one go, like I did). To someone looking at the show from the outside-in, it'll seem boring and he/she'd be wondering how this show managed to get so popular in the first place. The appeal of this show mostly stems from Daria herself.

***

Daria starts out as a cynical 16-year-old high school junior that's more or less an outcast. She's garnered a reputation at school for being a "brain," is anti-social and generally prefers to read books, eat pizza, and watch TV than go to parties and hang out with people. Daria tends to provide the "colour commentary" for what goes on around her and responds to everything with either sarcasm or unbridled cynicism.

The first three seasons show Daria tackling various tasks that she ordinarily wouldn't do of her own free will (like taking a self-esteem course, gathering funds for a new coffee house, babysitting, and part-time employment) all the while having to deal with the various . . . "challenges" that await her (like dealing with an overly-sensitive teacher, being reprimanded for not selling chocolate to a hyperglycaemic, dealing with two 'brainwashed' children who pray for world peace every night before bed, and tending to an idiot who can't remember what an almond looks like). Daria remains more or less the same throughout these seasons, and there isn't a lot of development of her character. That isn't to say there isn't any development at all but the only times that Daria gets any sort of character development is if someone dies, or if Aunt Amy or Trent play a major part of an episode,.

The last two seasons of the show really delve into Daria's character and some of the challenges she'll face aren't so easy to handle. For example, in the Season 4 finale "Is It Fall Yet?" she has to deal with life without her friend, Jane (who left for an artist's colony for the summer). "Boxing Daria" from Season 5 is another good example of what I'm talking about. In this episode, she recalls a fight her parents had regarding her antisocial tendencies and as a result, she has to deal with the possibility that maybe the adults in her life aren't as one-dimensional as they seem.

***

Daria is a show that most people think only teenagers (like juniors and seniors in high school) can relate to, but that's usually not the case. If you have a kid who's bookish and/or socially withdrawn, Daria can definitely be a show the two of you can watch together. Some of the humour might get a little over your kid's head but that doesn't mean you won't get it. Despite appearances, Daria is a show that parents can enjoy just as much as teenagers do (especially if you're into dry humour).

The lack of any good role models in this show is actually a good thing. Parents are the most powerful role model in a kid's life, so why even bother shifting that kind of responsibility to a TV show character?

Violence? Well there's none of that in this show.

Sex? Well it's a show that takes place in a high school setting, so there's bound to be *some* hormonally stressed-out teens and indeed, there are. There's nothing outright shown, and most of the time it's mentioned in-passing. If you have a problem with any mention of sex or any hints of it whatsoever, despite what you might think, most fourth graders tend to have *some* idea of what sex is. Most TV sitcoms, film trailers, pop music videos, popular songs, etc. sort of give away what a man and a woman can do behind closed doors. Check your kid's browsing history while they're young.

Swearing? The worst that I've ever heard out of this show is "damn" (which Daria's family tend to say semi-frequently) and the occasional "crap" and let's be honest, those are the kind of swears that get thrown around in the school yard during recess. This show uses a lot of dry humour and sarcastic wit so there's no real need for swearing to begin with.

Consumerism? I don't think fan fiction and deviantART entries count.

Drugs, alcohol, and tobacco are next to non-existent. Regarding drugs, there's nothing mentioned, however there's a segment of the fanbase that think Trent and his band are stoners (but then again, they could just be good-for-nothing slackers). Alcohol is very rarely shown, and when it is, it's usually in an appropriate setting (i.e. Helen having a little too much champagne at a wedding). As for tobacco, well I think there's one or two scenes where a bystander is smoking, but again. Bystander. Nobody of significance smokes anything.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Adult Written byMrsplouge July 8, 2014

CSM is really confused

The show should not be iffy for 13, it's more like iffy for 10 and under. Even the uncut airings, that is, if you avoid My Night At Daria's, which is about sex. There is a little swearing, but they don't say "fuck" or anything. Mostly "damn", "crap", and "hell".

This title contains:

Sexy stuff
Language
Parent of a 6, 8, and 12-year-old Written byMado-Mado July 7, 2013

My type of humor

This is one of my favorite shows personally. Sometimes I will watch it with my 12 year old son. I don't watch it around my younger ones because there is some content they shouldn't see. I think it brings up interesting topics and things people should think about.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Sexy stuff
Language
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking
Adult Written byMovieCritic699 October 5, 2019

As Awesome, & Cool as MTV's DARIA was throughout our lives, Still, Parents, Boys & Girls, Be On Your Guard!

Dramatic Comedy is a genre in which comedy and drama are mixed in roughly equal amounts.

The creation of a story in the dramatic comedy venue can be achieved through the mixing and matching of the various sub-genres present in the respective parts of the overall genre, such as action comedies or parodies that operate more as an homage to the original work than a mockery of it. While some dramatic comedies blend each part together seamlessly, others will switch back and forth between the two throughout the story, often starting off comedic, then becoming serious toward the end.

Online Reference:

https://dariawiki.org/wiki/Dramatic_Comedy

Note: Satire, Definition: A literary work, or work of art in which human vice or folly is ridiculed or attacked scornfully, the branch of literature that composes such work. Irony, derision or caustic wit used to attack or expose, even unmask that same human folly, vice or even stupidity.

Online Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satire

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Sexy stuff
Language
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking
Adult Written byDaria Morgendorfer August 4, 2019

CSM is confused yet again

Daria is an amazing TV show. For sex, it has a few scenes of people making out, but no simulated stuff. There is innuendo but it's not nearly as crude or lewd as the Simpsons or family guy. For violence, there is absolutely nothing you need to worry about. The only thing even remotely violent in this show is people talking about shootings. Once again there is nothing simulated. As for swearing, it's pretty normal for kids to hear cursing, this show contains the words: hell crap and d*mn. But apart from that, this show is amazing and I highly recommend it to anyone eleven or older
Adult Written byAndrew L. January 3, 2018
Adult Written byclarence August 4, 2015
Adult Written byMike M July 28, 2014

Thoughtful animated series may not appeal to children.

Daria is a great TV show for teenagers, but children most likely will not understand the underlying messages and themes portrayed in the series. Every episode has a positive message or moral dilemma associated with it. The characters in the show all represent high school archetypes. The eponymous character is sarcastic and cynical, sometimes extremely depressing with her views on life. However, the show has a lot of heart. There is a good amount of cartoon violence and slapstick humor, as well as a few pop culture references throughout the series. Expect basic swears such as "stupid," "jerk," and "damn," but no major curses you wouldn't want your younger child hearing. Relevant teenage issues such as dating and self-esteem are discussed and highlighted thoroughly. There are some kisses and a high school couple (a football player and cheerleader) make out and toss around suggestive comments. Daria's parents are both caring and successful, but they make bad decisions in certain episodes. Daria's sister is superficial and shallow, as are her friends. Many of Daria's fellow classmates dismiss her based on the way she looks and on her personality.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Violence & scariness
Sexy stuff
Language
Parent of a 5-year-old Written byCranberries June 23, 2010
Daria was a wonderful show.Daria is the girl every high school has, she was brilliant, cynical, sarcastic, and wasn't afraid to say what was on her mind. She was anti-social, but that didn't mean she was a dangerous person or anything. She just didn't want to be around people who just didn't get it....basically everyone. The characters are stereotypical. Such as the ditsy cheerleader Brittany and her dim-witted football star boyfriend Kevin. the show satirizes a lot of high school and suburban life.
Daria's mom is work-a-holic who does try to bond with her daughter, but just can't help stay on top of everything.
The principal of the high school is a corrupt and paranoid woman who often goes overboard with school security when there's obviously no need for it. The popular kids of the high school are shown as "stupid" "arrogant"
"selfish" and "almost unteachable". But as there is a chance for a character to show some sort of intelligence and integrity, like Daria's sister Quinn, the 'cute' one of the fashion club, shows humanity and that she does in fact have a brain, but has to hide herself from her friends and admirers because shes afraid of being called "smart" and therefore not popular and attractive. Though she does learn later in the series that really is not the case. Daria taught lessons about not caring about certain aspects of conformity, among other things.
Some might say that the characters are over the top and overblown. But for people like Daria, that is how they are.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Adult Written byKaraXLove November 24, 2009

Daria=Amazing

Well, I love Daria. I watch it with my 11 year old sister all the time, and I think with what kids know these days, it's totally appropriate. Kids are smarter than you give them credit for and know what satire is. Some of the kids in it might not be good role models, especially in the beginning, but throughout the series there's a lot of character development and I generally think it's a good show.
Adult Written byhotmomma1991 November 8, 2009

A Great Show As Long As Parents Address the Issues

Daria (not to be confused with the separate show Beavis and Butthead which in my opinion is simply crude and uneducated humor) is an excellent show with a lot of good values. It portrays the power of the mind, independence, making the right choices, some underlying feminism ideals, as well as wit and sarcasm. I don't see why this show can't be intriguing and mind-nourishing for children, as long and parents watch the show with them if they are under the age of 15.

This title contains:

Language
Adult Written byetoile April 9, 2008