Parent reviews for Gilmore Girls

Common Sense says

Fun coming-of-age drama that's great for teens.
Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 13+
Based on 51 reviews

Kids say

age 12+
Based on 162 reviews
Adult Written byRobbruin83 February 19, 2011

Perhaps thé perfect TV-series to get your child(ren) get acquainted with everything that might be called "life"

I have to be honest: the moment I decided to review this brill TV-series, I reckoned it to be fit for ány age. But when I came to think of it deeper, I really came up with the notion that perhaps only teens from 11+ (give or take a year or two, depending on how mature your child(ren) is (are)) can fully appreciate this show. Again, being honest: I reckon this show as not containing things that might shock your child(ren). In fact, in a certain way, all is life-like, but without the sharp edge. Every parent knows that sooner or later his/her child learns about the birds and the bees, and so many other things that may qualify as "that's life". This show might be thé source of all of that for your child. Because it not only shows the nice, fine, and pleasant aspects of it all, it also shows that, like everything, all comes with good ánd bad, thus showing the consequences of it all. For almost everything major happening in this show, there's a balance of 'pro vs. anti', which creates an opening for you and your child(ren) to debate about it, share eachothers thoughts. Below are some topics of the show, followed by the storyline it involves with, and concluding with my review of Talk About concerning that topic. * Religion | Storyline: Lane Kim (Rory's best friend) doesn't believe in anything but music, while her mother is a very strict Korean christian, all of which make Lane turne out to be a very creative girl involving hiding everything; from CDs to (potential) relationships, and from lavalamps to her dreams. | Talk About: how do you see religion, and how does your child(ren) see it? Is there room for personal views, eventhough they may not be the same? * Virginity | Storyline: Rory's friend/rival Paris confesses to her that she lost her virginity, and reckoned it great but weird at the same time. Rory, after Paris asked for her experience, confesses that, although in her second relationship (first being Dean, second being Jess), she's still a virgin, because she doesn't feel 'ready yet'. In a later season, however, she looses her virginity to Dean, who is, at that time, married with another girl. It wasn't a secret, though, that they both still loved eachother, eventhough they were in other relationships. With both situations, the 'no glove, no love' (i.e. do it safe) is emphasised. | Talk About: what does it mean to have sex, and loose your virginity? Is it OK to have sex with someone who loves you, and you love him/her, eventhough one of the involved persons is already committed? Is there a 'wrong vs. right' in such a situation? What may be defined as being 'the right person'? * Pregnancy | Storyline: Lorelai, unmarried, had her child (Rory) when she was a teen. | Talk About: if having sex, what kind of consequences does it may have? * Virginity part 2 | Storyline: Lane Kim falls in love with a bandmate of hers. Eventhough she loves to try everything her mother told her not to, she remains virgin until she is married with this guy from her band, which turned out to be 'the one' for her. She didn't like sex (on her honeymoon), though, and she even praises her mother for making sex sound so wrong, for 'it is'. She turns out to be pregnant of twins, eventhough she used a (discount Mexican), though. | Talk About: this might be THE opportunity to speak about condoms and pregnancy in general; are they safe (enough)? If having sex, what are the basic steps to make it safe? And if something happens, is it something that your child(ren) can say to you? * Relationships | Storyline: Lorelai seems to runaway from the relationships she has with men. | Talk About: is a relationship scary? Why is it/isn't it something to runaway for? Again: what may be defined as 'the right person'? * Family | Storyline: Lorelai has many ups and downs with her parents, and although she and Rory are mostly girlfriends first and parent-child later, they also have some highs and lows during the 7 seasons. Another example is Lane Kim; coming from a strict Korean family, during the seasons she and her mother get estranged from one another, though they ultimately seem to share a relationship nearly as close as Lorelai and Rory seem to have, being able to talk with eachother as full-grown adults.| Talk About: what does family mean? Is there a point in which you and your child(ren) can see eachother as fully-grown adults/human beings?What might mark that point? Is everyone allowed to have his/her own ideas? * Social status | Storyline: The parents of Lorelai, Richard & Emily Gilmore, are of a certain high-class society, which is something that Lorelai just wanted to escape, because of its many rules and etiquette. In later years, she does her best to be 'working-class', for 'high-class' stands for strings and etiquette, and 'working-class' stands for indepence. | Talk About: what are the social classes in society? Are there many differences? Is a certain social class happier or unhappier, or even better off/ not better off than another? Are there simularities in how social classes experience life? And there are many other topics in this show that create a great opening for you and your child(ren) to talk about! My reason for giving it an "On for 11+" rating: there are so many references in this show (from film to music, and from TV-series to TV-personalities), that even many adults don't understand it all. However, the topics in this show should be seen by 11+ children, for it gives them a (for parents) safe glipmse of the teenyears that are ahead of them. I also would like to mention, though, that it depends per child; if a child is 10, but very mature for his/her age, then he/she might like it, but if a child is 13, but not as ready, than I would hold it of just a bit. It does, however, involves the objective common sense of a parent.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Parent of a 10 year old Written byshertoo May 7, 2011
Parent Written byMonicaMom July 8, 2015

Great show, mostly amazing role models, but a few things to talk about...

I won't write a big long review of the show because there are already many good reviews from parents. However, there was one thing that was missing from the reviews: The worst thing about the show is that the main characters and others use words like "gay" in a derogatory manner. For example, one called a man's bag a "gay bag". There have been at least 3 or 4 instances of this which isn't a huge amount, but of course one is too many. Also, coming from characters on the show who are otherwise positive role models, it almost seems worse because younger children might think that this is an acceptable way to talk. It's one of the things that parents need to talk with their children about when they watch the show.
Adult Written bylaughingbear. September 10, 2009
i was watching this when i was 7.
Parent of a 11 year old Written byCalifornia parent December 18, 2013

College-age topics from a college coed's perspective

Well done show, but it's worth noting that the show is largely from the perspective of Rory, a college-age girl. As such, many of the episodes cover college-age topics, including sex, alcohol use, and more. Usually done in a sensitive, positive manner, but I don't really think it's a good fit for many "tweens" who would probably be better served with shows more focused on middle school and high school.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Sexy stuff
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking
Adult Written bychristian-witness June 28, 2012

14+

Some kissing and suggestive language, sex is implied off-screen, couples shown in bed together. Adult words are frequently used.

This title contains:

Sexy stuff
Language
Parent Written bySimmsMolly October 23, 2012

Watch it with your daughter/mum!!

This show is great! I want to start watching it with my daughter but I think 11 is slightly too young so I'm waiting atleast :)

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Sexy stuff
Parent of a 13 year old Written byMinneapolis Parent April 24, 2010
The only thing I question for 13's is sometimes causal sexual or drug references. It shows Rory in a causal sexual relationship with her college soon to be boyfriend. Been there, done that but I'm not sure I want my 13 year old seeing that just yet. That being said this is one of my all-time favorite shows and I own the series.

This title contains:

Sexy stuff
Parent of a 1, 3, 13, and 16 year old Written byNikkiV June 2, 2009

A great gift for any girl

I'm getting this box set for my little sister for her birthday because I loved watching this show as a teenager. It's a wholesome show that girls can really grow up with.
Adult Written byloserforChrist9028 March 25, 2013

Good show for teens and up, but not bad for preteens

I've always loved Rory and Lorelai's relationship. It reminds me of my relationship with my mom; we've always been like best friends, but she's my mom first. While the show isn't perfect, and neither is Rory and Lorelai's relationship, it does set a rather good example of the kind of relationship people typically want with their parents: both a parent-child relationship, but also able to be like friends when appropriate (such as when spending the day together to bond). The show does have some language, but nothing that teens don't already often hear; the language doesn't get excessive, though. The show also addresses underage drinking, so it does of course show some drinking. And it also addresses first times, shows couples kissing, and what not; but it's never excessive or explicit, sexual situations are just implied or talked about. So overall, I think it's a really good show and it appropriate for maybe high school and up, not as much for middle school...but that's up to the parent. **I started watching the show as a child (like elementary/middle school), but I never had any negative consequences of that. I turned out just fine. The show has many good lessons and I don't think it'd be a bad thing for people younger than high school age to watch it from time to time.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Sexy stuff
Language
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking
Adult Written byCassEhn March 5, 2010

This title contains:

Sexy stuff
Positive Messages
Adult Written byItsWhit March 7, 2017

Not What I Expected

I heard so many good things about this series and having never watched it decided to check it out. I'm 23 years old and didn't continue watching because of the amount of sex and language in the show. It just makes you feel "bleh." I tried to look past several parts, but when the whole plot is based on on/off relationships with no real consistency ... it makes it hard to keep watching. Show pushes rebellion as the mother always wants her daughter to "experience life and be wild" and far too much emphasis on premarital sex. In my opinion, there are other ways to teach your young girls certain things than to expose them to such mindsets as the show brings on. If you are a parent that really filters what your kids watch, then save yourself the time and skip this one.

This title contains:

Sexy stuff
Language
Adult Written bycruella18 April 9, 2008

My favorite TV show

I love the wit on this show, it's very smartly done. I don't care for the premarital sex, but it could be used for great communication between parents and teens. A little less swearing would also be great. The one thing that bothered me, as I'm sure it did others, was the last scene of last seasons last show. I hope next season doesn't turn "icky."
Parent of a 3, 11, and 13 year old Written byB H. November 5, 2016

Great Mother-Daughter Show!

For me, this show helped me bond with both of my daughters. I have an 11-year-old and 13-year-old, and this show gives us a chance to get together and enjoy something together. The show has good role models and bad role models, and goes over so many of the coming-of-age topics moms might be nervous to talk about. I sort of utilized this show as an opportunity to talk with my daughters, and we ended up pausing the show a lot to discuss what had happened. The first two seasons are innocent enough: Young Lorelai is raising her daughter Rory to be smart and responsible. Rory goes to an Ivy League private school where she struggles with some form of mean girls, popular girls, and boys. Lorelai works at an inn with her friend Sookie, and struggles to raise her daughter while dealing with work and the parents she doesn't get along with too well. Some talk topics might include: Lorelai got pregnant with Rory when she was 16 (good opportunity to talk about sex, losing virginity, and being sexually responsible at a young age), some of the peer pressure of school kids, what comes with having a boyfriend, and Rory's friend Lane, who is raised strictly and constantly rebels with a hidden stash of unapproved material (talk about the pros and cons of this: Lane is being independent and knows what she wants from her life, but she is disrespecting the rules of her mother, which she might not understand). Once seasons 3 and 4 role around, things get a little heavy. Rory is headed off to college at Yale, and is becoming an independent woman. Rory is an excellent, committed student and a compassionate friend, but she still attends parties, drinks underage, and has boyfriend relations. Before Rory goes to college, she has sex for the first time with her ex-boyfriend, and the conversations that ensue with her mother are great to talk about. In college, Rory attends parties, goes on blind dates, and eventually gets a boyfriend. They frequently kiss and have sex (nothing shown). After having some problems with her boyfriend, she gets drunk on punch and has a bit of a meltdown. By the end of season 5, Rory is having a considerable amount of trouble both at school and at home after a bad review from her boss. She steals a yacht out of desperation, gets arrested, and then drops of college without her mother's further knowledge to live at her grandparents house. Arguments ensue. That's how far my daughters and I have gotten. The show does get increasingly more edgy as Rory gets older, and the not-amazing acting makes it sort of hard to get through, but overall I think it's a great show to watch WITH YOUR KIDS! The amounts of sex, swearing, and drinking are pretty realistic. Lorelai does encourage her daughter to party and drink underage because she thinks it's "natural". All of the characters say basic swear words (no f words) and have sex (nothing shown). Frequent focus on romantic relations. Main characters switch frequently between lovers.

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Sexy stuff
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking
Adult Written byflorida mom April 9, 2008

Great show for older kids to watch with parents

I love watching this show with my teenage daughter. There are great opportunities to talk about issues and how parents and teens have to wrestle with them. I don't mind my 12 year-old-watching it with us, but wouldn't really want her to watch it on her own. It is smart, funny, challenging TV (for a change).
Adult Written byaless_89 April 9, 2008

a must see show

Gilmore Girls is the best show ever. I love how Loralie and Rory have that great bond. What i like about it most though is that it shows the problems that most teenagers and adults go through. I can relate so much to it. I never miss one show!!
Adult Written byluluzinha February 27, 2016

This title contains:

Positive Messages
Positive role models
Adult Written byjoesy April 9, 2008

I cried and laughed

I absolutely LOVE this show. They talk a lot, a lot but it's really good for teenage girls. There is drinking but not underage drinking and not excessive. The show deals with boyfriends, jobs, and education issues.
Parent of a 3, 6, and 8 year old Written byJessicaBurton1980 January 5, 2009
Adult Written byschoolgirl April 9, 2008

Best show on TV

I love Gilmore Girls and I think it's a great show to watch with young, teenage girls. There is alot to talk about with young viewers when watching: strong women, social class, importance of education and friendships. I have followed Rory's character from the beginning and I truly love her strong, smart character. She is probably the only female character on TV that is smart and perhaps reflects what many American girls truly like. She is not your stereotypical ditzy, boy crazy, submissive female character. She is quiet, but strong, loves her family and loves to read and is assertive. I simply adore this show, it's witty, fast, and intelligent. I hope they keep it on the air for many more years.

Pages