Parent reviews for The Healing Powers of Dude

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Common Sense says

age 7+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 8+

Based on 12 reviews

Kids say

age 8+

Based on 21 reviews

age 6+

I hate this show.

I hate this show sm. It's so cringe and they teach poorly about social anxiety disorder and I have it so I have every right to say so. The parents are also so poorly executed. Please make a better show I'm begging.
age 11+
The show was awesome. It was a relief watching something nice, fun and super _real life_ for a change (u know, rather than magic and fights all day long). Has great messages of acceptance and friendship. There lotsa romance in the end episodes, but nothing a tween can’t handle. It was very family friendly in my opinion.
age 15+

Inappropriate

The first few episodes are fine and very family friendly but then it starts to be all about boyfriends and girlfriends, I don’t think it’s appropriate, it should have said so in the review, as it does for other movies or series. It also portrays most adults as dumb.
age 11+
age 8+

Potential, but terribly executed

As a teacher, and a mom of a differently-abled child, I found this show terribly unrealistic. To start, the adults are terribly out of touch. The principal is a caricature at best, the teacher has no real knowledge of accommodations for a student with disabilities, and the parents - especially the dad- are very misguided and fumbling in resourcing their son. Is this an important issue? Yes. Could the adults actually be portrayed as helpful and knowledgeable? Yes. There are so many school administrators, teachers, and parents who are in the thick of helping students with disabilities. I don’t know any educator who would act like the ones shown in this terrible show. (I.e. the principal eating a rainbow sprinkle cookie while taunting the dog. Come on. Or the principal being unaware of a service animal being on campus?! What?! How about the teacher who assigns a public speaking assignment to a kid with an anxiety disorder? I have taught those children. We always go back to the accommodations and provide different means for completing the assignment.) It’s a great idea. This is a population that needs recognition. Just, don’t make the adults idiots in the process of telling the story.
age 8+

Original premise great to watch and engage with family

This is a great series - while the premise is about a boy with social anxiety disorder and his support dog, I loved it because it was really just facing everyday scenarios where just getting through the day was a success. It was really original and avoided the temptation to follow the cliches of getting the girl and saving the day, but just celebrating small wins. That's more about life than anything else.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
age 2+

Not realistic at all

Watched the first few episodes with my kids . . . So disappointed. . .not realistic at all. As a family that deals with anxiety disorder and social anxiety disorder, this is not what life is like. We are on a three year waiting list for a support dog. Not realistic. Cute show. . .but irritating to see reviews that say it is a show that shows real life.
age 8+

Very Good!

This show is a role model for Many kids around the world and shows people it´s okay to be scared and when you are there are good friends to help you along the way. Also dude (The dog),Turbo and Embry are pretty funny and this show is worth watching. In my opinion, if I could I would rate it 10 stars.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
age 9+

Dude can read Noah's mind !

I can't wait for the next season! I really like this show because I like how Dude is funny. I also like how Noah would imagines things that aren't there and Dude can imagine them too. Dude seems to be able to read Noah's mine and and be there when he needs him. When Noah imagines things I can feel how he's feeling. After every episode there's a cliffhanger and I want to keep on watching the episodes.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
age 7+

Authentic Representation

According to the Geena Davis Institute, less than one percent of characters in children's television have a disability, compared to 20% of the population in America. The Healing Powers of Dude features two characters with disabilities - Noah (Jace Chapman), a middle schooler with social anxiety disorder, and Amara (Sophie Kim), a middle schooler with a physical disability using a power wheelchair. Sophie herself has muscular dystrophy and has used a wheelchair since she was four years old. A win for authentic casting! And kids need to see themselves represented on their screens - both with nonvisible and visible disabilities. There is such a stigma when talking about mental illness and The Healing Powers of Dude gives kids who have anxiety a vehicle to tell their parents how they feel. Obviously, everyone has different experiences. So while some will feel that this show depicts their experience, others may feel differently. No one character can represent everyone with that disability. And the depiction of the emotional support dog is not as accurate as it should be, but this is not a documentary. It is a kids show. And it teaches accepting people who are different than yourself.

This title has:

Great messages