Allie Finkle's Rules for Girls: Moving Day

Book review by
Kate James, Common Sense Media
Allie Finkle's Rules for Girls: Moving Day Book Poster Image
Cabot for tweens introduces a spunky heroine.

Parents say

age 13+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 8+
Based on 6 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this book.

Positive Messages

Bad acts have consequences; good deeds are rewarded. Allie realizes she's not being a nice friend and tries to change her ways.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Allie's not very likable at first. She calls her best friend, Mary Kay, a cry baby when she's the one that often brings her friend to tears. When Allie realizes that her own behavior could use some improvement, she creates a book of rules to keep herself in line, such as: "Don't stick a spatula down your best friend's throat."

Violence & Scariness

Reference to "splattered brains" from a car accident; some mild horror movie images; a cat is treated cruelly, but the act is punished; mention of one newt eating another one.

Language

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that in the title character in Allie Finkle's Rule for Girls: Moving Day is innocently fascinated with the gory details of a boy who got run over by a car, reflecting on his "splattered brains." Allie also enjoys horror movies and refers to certain scenes that may make a young reader's skin crawl. A group of kids are cruel to a cat, swinging it around in a suitcase, but are punished later. Kids may want to check out other books in the series, including Allie Finkle's Rule for Girls: The New Girl, and the series' website.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written by1chelsea12 July 8, 2015

awesome

this book is amazing no lie
Kid, 9 years old September 24, 2009

Tweens will luv it!

EXtremely cute book! I have moved 2 states and I totally know how she feels. It just might be a bit hard for younger kids to understand and she is a little naug... Continue reading
Kid, 12 years old January 22, 2011

Very good book for kids 9+!!!!

I have read all of the Allie Finkle series so far and I love them! They are very entertaining and super funny. Product placement is used, as Allie mentions Dair... Continue reading

What's the story?

Allie Finkle doesn't realize how much she likes her old school and old friends until her parents announce the family is moving into a dark and creepy house straight out of a ghost story. As Allie tries to decide if her parents are crazy, she creates a secret book of rules for herself that's full of reminders like \"Treat your friends the way you would want them to treat you\" and \"Don't get a pet that poops in your hand.\" Allie's complete list of rules is included in the back of the book -- kids shouldn't read them until they're done or it might spoil some surprises.

Is it any good?

Younger fans of Meg Cabot's other bestsellers -- like The Princess Diaries series -- will be eager to meet Allie Finkle, the heroine of Cabot's first series especially for tweens. Allie's not very likable at first. For instance, she complains bitterly about her best friend, Mary Kay, calling her a cry baby when she's the one that often brings her friend to tears. When Allie realizes that her own behavior could use some improvement, she creates a book of rules to remind her of simple and rather offbeat things to keep herself in line, such as: "Don't stick a spatula down your best friend's throat."

Allie becomes more likable and relatable as her family's moving day approaches. Kids who have been there will feel for her. She hates the house (saying it was probably rejected from the TV show My House is Really Old. Won't Someone Fix It, Please?) and wants to foil her parents' plan but knows she has no real control over it. But Allie will get over it and kids looking for engaging, light reading with a quirky heroine will be looking forward to Allie's next adventure and her next set of offbeat rules.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what it's like to move. Are there any good things about moving and changing schools?

  • What other books about third-graders have you read? How does this one compare with those?

  • Peer pressure is an issue in Allie Finkle's Rule for Girls: Moving Day. Was there a time you had to stand up to a friend? If you saw someone hurting an animal, what would you do?

Book details

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