Chasing Lucky

Book review by
Amanda Nojadera, Common Sense Media
Chasing Lucky Book Poster Image
Sweet but predictable romance highlights communication.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 14+
Based on 2 reviews

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Educational Value

Meant to entertain rather than educate.

Positive Messages

Communication is an important theme. Admit when you're wrong and try to fix your mistakes. 

Positive Role Models

These characters have their flaws, but they are smart, funny, and hardworking. They eventually learn how important open, honest communication is in healthy relationships.

Violence

Chasing Lucky deals with toxic relationships and digital harassment. Characters receive demeaning texts and are humiliated in public. A nude photo of Josie's mom is shared around town and eventually plastered on the bookstore's window. Multiple storefronts are vandalized. Two characters get into a car accident. Another reveals that her college professor convinced her to pose nude for him and later threatened to make her life hell if she tried to get child support from him.

Sex

Author Jenn Bennett does an excellent job of including well-written, sex-positive scenes. Characters kiss, make out, and lose their virginity. A mom and daughter discuss protected sex. A couple is caught in bed half-naked.

Language

Characters repeatedly use variations of "s--t," "f--k," "crap," "hell," "ass," "dick," "whore," "bitch," "bastard," "hag," "Jesus," and "goddamn."

Consumerism

The Goldens, people who go to the elite private school Golden Academy, come from Old Money families. A lot of the plot deals with the Goldens vs. the working middle class in Beauty.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

A character repeatedly gets drunk and harasses Josie and her cousin. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Jenn Bennet's Chasing Lucky is a sweet, but predictable contemporary romance about a girl named Josie Saint-Martin who falls in love with her childhood best friend, Lucky Karras. The book deals with toxic relationships and digital harassment. Characters receive demeaning texts and are humiliated in public. A nude photo of Josie's mom is shared around town and eventually plastered on the bookstore's window. Multiple storefronts are vandalized. Two characters get into a car accident. Another reveals that her college professor convinced her to pose nude for him and later threatened to make her life hell if she tried to get child support from him. Characters kiss, make out, and lose their virginity. A mom and daughter discuss protected sex. A couple is caught in bed half-naked and characters repeatedly use variations of "s--t," "f--k," "crap," "hell," "ass," "dick," "Jesus," and "goddamn."

User Reviews

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Teen, 16 years old Written byWeAreReaders May 11, 2021

Head Over Heels!!!

I have read some really great (and some super awful) romance novels, but this one was truly amazing! It wasn't too fluffy and the storyline was good. I lo... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written byzionrachell14 February 2, 2021

What's the story?

In CHASING LUCKY, 17-year-old Josie Saint-Martin is returning to her New England hometown Beauty after dramatically leaving five years ago with her single mom. Now that they're back in Beauty to run the family bookstore after moving from city to city, Josie's convinced she's found a way to join her dad on the West Coast and start her career as a photographer. But things don't go as planned when Josie barely avoids getting into some serious trouble because Lucky Karras -- the town bad boy and her former childhood best friend -- takes the blame. Will Josie figure out why Lucky covered for her or why her heart starts to beat faster whenever she's around him?

Is it any good?

This sweet but predictable contemporary romance deals with complicated relationships and miscommunication. It's clear that Josie and Lucky have chemistry, and readers will love their witty banter, but Chasing Lucky progresses too slowly with unnecessary drama. As Josie begins to understand why Lucky took the blame for her mistake and uncovers shocking family secrets, teens will see how essential open, honest communication is in a healthy relationship.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the appeal of realistic contemporary novels like Chasing Lucky. Why are they so popular with teens? What makes them relatable?

  • How are sex and romance portrayed in Chasing Lucky? What do you think of Josie and Lucky's relationship?

  • Which characters, if any, do you consider role models in the book? What character strengths do they exemplify?

Book details

  • Author: Jenn Bennett
  • Genre: Contemporary Fiction
  • Topics: High School
  • Book type: Fiction
  • Publisher: Simon Pulse
  • Publication date: November 10, 2020
  • Publisher's recommended age(s): 14 - 18
  • Number of pages: 416
  • Available on: Paperback, Nook, Audiobook (unabridged), Hardback, iBooks, Kindle
  • Last updated: August 15, 2021

Our editors recommend

For kids who love romance

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