My Soul to Take

Book review by
Kate Pavao, Common Sense Media
My Soul to Take Book Poster Image
Not literary, but fun teen fantasy (and plenty of romance).

Parents say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

Kids say

age 12+
Based on 3 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this book.

Educational Value

May get teens interested in learning about banshees and other mythical creatures.

Positive Messages

There is a good message in the midst of all this romance and mysticism about accepting who you are and fighting for the people you love.  It's quiet, but it's there.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Kaylee is a strong character who is willing to do what she can to save those she loves. 

Violence

Nothing too graphic, but a number of girls do drop dead of no apparent cause. Also, Kaylee's mother was killed in car accident, and, later in the book, her aunt dies. There are a number of rather creepy creatures, and a rather intense scene in which Kaylee battles a grim reaper for her cousin's soul.

Sex

Some pretty passionate makeout sessions, including lots of licking and burning kisses that "scalded ... in the most delicious way." Kaylee wonders about Nash's reputation and if he will end their romance if she has sex with him.

Language

A few words here and there, including "crap" and "s--t."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Kaylee's best friend has a drink at a club they've snuck into, and another girl there is very drunk. After Kaylee and her cousin see a classmate die, Kaylee's aunt gives her daughter prescription pills to help her sleep, and then gets drunk. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this book features both fantastical creature and murders, though violence is pretty limited. Kaylee has to deal with demons --  both real ones and symbolic ones (like accepting that her mother died so she can live).  Also, it is a Harlequin, so expect some romance (although, making out is as far as the main characters go). Some characters drink, and an adult gives her daughter sleeping pills that aren't prescribed to her. In the end, though, the heroine is a strong character who fights for those she loves. Fantasy fans may even be inspired to research the myths this story is based around.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 12 years old June 19, 2010

awesome thrilling tale

i loved it it was so great but very intense but there actually isnt any S BEHAVIOR other than kissing
Teen, 14 years old Written bySwagmaster09 October 29, 2009

What's the story?

It's a crazy four days for Kaylee. Pretty girls keep dropping dead around her for no apparent cause -- and she is able to predict their untimely deaths just before they happen. Luckily good lookin' Nash has an explanation about what's really happening and some ideas for how to stop it. He also has a voice that seems to calm her -- and some hot kisses to keep her distracted.

Is it any good?

Well, this is certainly not going to meet anyone's definition of a classic, but it is good fun. There are mythical creatures, a dark mystery, a romance, and even some humor along the way  ("Minions!" Thinks Kaylee during her final face off  with a grim reaper "She did not just call me a minion!").  Readers may be surprised that Kaylee can process so much in just four days -- from finding out she's not human to hooking up with her first boyfriend (not to mention discovering  why all the pretty girls around her keep dropping dead for no reason).  But those who love a fast-paced fantasy novel will keep up with this plot-heavy book -- the first in a series -- and eagerly await the next installment about the feisty heroine. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the popularity of the fantasy book series. This is just part one of the Soul Screamers series -- do you think you'll read the next one? What is so great about a series? Why do think they are so popular right now, especially those series that feature vampires, werewolves, and other mythical creatures? 

  • On a related note, Kaylee has to accept the fact that she is not human. Families can discuss what kinds of creatures they'd like to be (or not) -- and why that idea of being something supernatural might be appealing to teens who are exploring -- and learning to accept -- their own identities. 

  • Also, Harlequins have been around for a long time -- and teens have been reading them long before the HarlequinTeen imprint was launched. Why would a publisher decided to publish these just for teens? How are they different from their adult counterparts? Which do you prefer?

Book details

For kids who love fantasy and addictive series

Our editors recommend

Top advice and articles

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate