Silverlicious

Book review by
Kate Pavao, Common Sense Media
Silverlicious Book Poster Image
Pinkalicious learns that sweetness comes from inside.

Parents say

age 4+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 3+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this book.

Educational Value

Parents can use this book to encourage reading -- or bite deeper into the book's message.

Positive Messages

Pinkalicious learns to "be as sweet" as her sweet tooth -- and that acting bratty is not a way to get what she wants.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Pinkalicious may not always act perfectly, but kids will likely understand her devastation when she loses her ability to taste sweets! And ultimately she does learn her lesson about sweetness coming from the inside -- and even shares her chocolate with her brother. 

Violence & Scariness

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this is the newest installment in the popular Pinkalicious series. In this installment, Pinkalicious learns to "be as sweet" as her sweet tooth -- and that acting bratty is not a way to get what she wants. Parents of pink-loving kids can use this book to encourage reading -- or bite deeper into the book's message. There is a website that goes with this series where families can buy all sorts of products, including dolls, a tiara, and even pink dress-up heels.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 4 year old Written byRockies mama July 21, 2011

Sweet but not as sweet as its predecessors...

I found Silverlicious sweet and meaningful, but less so than its predecessors Pinkalicious and Purplelicious which both delve more deeply into great moral discu... Continue reading
Kid, 9 years old April 9, 2014

Silverlicious

I love Pinkalicious! I like the message of the story.

What's the story?

When Pinkalicious loses her sweet tooth, cookies suddenly taste like dirt. She writes to the tooth fairy for help, but is instead visited by Cupid, the Easter Bunny, and even a Christmas elf. But even though they give her special attention -- decorating her room, writing notes, and leaving treats -- Pinkalicious can't see (or taste) the sweetness and keeps asking for Tootheetina, her personal tooth fairy. Eventually, her tooth fairy does visit -- and helps her learn where true sweetness comes from.

Is it any good?

This is a pretty simple story with a wholesome (if somewhat saccharine) message about being kind to others. The art here is perhaps the true treat. Kids will have fun picking out all the details in Pinkalicious' room as it's decorated by Cupid, the Easter Bunny, and even a Christmas elf. They will notice more and more with each reading of the book, including the pink cupcake picture on her walls, the pink bunny prints on her floor, and more. In the end, this is a tasty addition to the popular series and a good choice for pink lovers.

The art here is perhaps the true treat. Kids will have fun picking out all the details in Pinkalicious' room as it is decorated by Cupid, the Easter Bunny, and even a Christmas elf. They will notice more and more with each reading of the book, including the pink cupcake picture on her wall, the pink bunny prints on her floor, and more. Parents can even use these illustrations to practice counting: Candy canes, hearts, rabbit paw prints, etc.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about sweetness. What are some ways that Pinkalicious could have been sweeter to her brother, the tooth fairy, and the other magical creatures that visit her? How do you know she has changed at the end?

  • Her room gets decorated by Cupid, the Easter Bunny, and a Christmas elf. Which room do you like best? Parents can even use these illustrations to practice counting: Candy canes, hearts, rabbit paw prints, etc.

Book details

For kids who love picture books

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