The Atlantis Complex: Artemis Fowl, Book 7

Book review by
Carrie R. Wheadon, Common Sense Media
The Atlantis Complex: Artemis Fowl, Book 7 Book Poster Image
Exciting Fowl story has rogue robots and a devious villain.

Parents say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

Kids say

age 9+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this book.

Educational Value

Some ideas on how we might slow climate change that are beyond our current technology. Science tidbits on the dangers to humans (and fairies) deep in the ocean. While kids won't be able to find Atlantis on the map, they can locate Cancun, Iceland, and Venice.

Positive Messages

Strong messages about the importance of family and friends, letting go of feelings of guilt over past actions, and the value of teamwork among unlikely allies. On the negative end, so to speak, jokes about explosive dwarf gas are a constant in the series.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Artemis develops a mental illness that stems from fairy magic in his system and feelings of guilt over the criminal life he led in his early teens. He learns to manage these feelings and atone for wrongs, all while fighting fear, paranoia, a split personality, and OCD impulses that are part of the illness. His friends are understanding about his suffering and still rely on his genius to save the day. Artemis also makes sure to call his mother and check in, but lies to her about where he is and what he's doing.

Violence

Loads of violent action, mostly in the fairy world with high-tech weapons. Most fairies can heal with their magic, but there are still a number of deaths from big-ship explosions (air and water). Fighting at a wrestling match in the ring and among the whole audience with many injuries. Characters knocked out multiple times with blasts of electricity and kidnaped. A fight with a giant squid. Fistsfights with knockouts and injuries. Mind control that makes friends fight and hurt each other. Villain talks of all his past exploits, especially how he coerced a woman to marry him by using mind control.

Sex

Ribbing over a past kiss between main characters.

Language

"Damn" and "jackass."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Drunk fairy in a bar mentions that he'll take something to sober up before flying. Mention of an alcoholic sprite.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that The Atlantis Complex is the seventh book of eight in the Artemis Fowl storyline. As with the first book, Artemis Fowl, and all that follow, there's a whole lot of fantasy violence here, mostly in the fairy world with high-tech weapons. Most fairies can heal with their magic, but there are still a number of deaths from big-ship explosions (air and water). Fighting at a wrestling match in the ring and among the whole audience ends with many injuries. Characters are knocked out multiple times with blasts of electricity and kidnapped. The villain talks of all his past exploits, especially how he coerced a woman to marry him by using mind control. All other mature content is very mild. Artemis not only fights his enemies here, but a treatable mental illness partially caused by feelings of guilt over the criminal life he led in his early teens. He learns to manage these feelings and atone for wrongs, all while fighting fear, paranoia, a split personality, and OCD impulses that are part of the illness. Artemis also makes sure to call his mother and check in, but lies to her about where he is and what he's doing.

Wondering if The Atlantis Complex: Artemis Fowl, Book 7 is OK for your kids?

Set preferences and get age-appropriate recommendations with Common Sense Media Plus. Join now

Continue reading Show less

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 11 years old February 19, 2020

Not as good as other books, but still good.

Personally, i thought that this wasn't one of Eoin Colfer's best stories, however that maybe be because i lost interest at the beginning of the book.... Continue reading

What's the story?

In THE ATLANTIS COMPLEX: ARTEMIS FOWL, BOOK 7, Artemis invites fairy officials to Iceland to demonstrate his latest invention. Before he can unveil it, unwanted guests arrive: a fairy space probe reprogrammed to take out Artemis and friends. But reprogrammed by whom? And where is it heading next? As Artemis barely escapes with his life, he's having a hard time pondering it. His mind is in the first stages of the Atlantis Complex, a psychosis common in guilt-ridden fairy criminals. He's having paranoid and OCD thoughts (Number 5: good, Number 4: really bad) until Holly stuns him and another personality named Orion takes over Artemis' mind almost entirely. Sadly for Holly, Orion is an insufferable romantic and no help at all when she decides to follow the rogue space probe.   

Is it any good?

This penultimate Artemis Fowl adventure delivers action, a conniving criminal, squishy robots, a giant squid, fairy psychosis, gassy dwarfs, and pro Mexican wrestling. You know, the usual, at least for Artemis and friends. Readers of the Artemis Fowl series are never bored, because Irish author Eoin Colfer always keeps his characters on the move and plotting. It's hard for Artemis to be as in control of the plotting in The Atlantis Complex as he usually is because of the fairy psychosis brewing in his brain. His mental state is yet another adversary for Artemis to face and makes him rely on friends more than usual here.

The main villain, Turnball, proves just as deliciously devious as Opal Kobai from earlier books, and with a surprising softer side, too. As his plans slowly unfold from his Atlantis prison cell, the old Artemis crew assembles to face him. Mulch Diggums always has a role to play, and a gassy one, along with Butler and Juliet, who have their own separate misadventures at the start of the story -- that's where the Mexican wrestling comes in. The Atlantis Complex closes with no hint of how the finale will play out, but with so much exciting fodder thus far, there's no need for spoilers.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how Artemis works through his fairy psychosis in The Atlantis Complex. And how do his friends help? 

  • What makes Turnball a villain? What are his good qualities? Do you think he deserves what happens to him in the end?

  • Will you read the finale of the Artemis Fowl series? What do you think will resolve with Artemis and his fairy friends?

Book details

Our editors recommend

For kids who love fantasy

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

Top advice and articles

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality.

Learn how we rate