The Good Girls: The Perfectionists, Book 2

Book review by
Kate Pavao, Common Sense Media
The Good Girls: The Perfectionists, Book 2 Book Poster Image
Twists, turns, loads of drama in high school murder mystery.

Parents say

age 12+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 12+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this book.

Educational Value

This may be a good book for reluctant readers who like the fast pace and constant dramatic tension; teens who enjoy this book may be inspired to check out other similar series.

Positive Messages

There is a message here about "never saying anything" that you might live to regret, and to count all the good things that you have going for you in your life.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The protagonists feel guilty about making the list of people to kill, and try to keep the body count from growing. And they confess to the police about the role they played in the murders.

Violence

There are several murders and attempted murders in the book, though none is described in detail. A boy falls out of a tree, breaking his leg. A girl mangles her hand as she tries to avoid being hit by a car. A boy beats a boy severely after discovering that boy raped his ex-girlfriend. A girl has scars on her face where her father attacked her. One of the main characters has a brother who killed himself after being bullied.

Sex

Characters kiss -- there's one steamy make out scene in a store's dressing room. A teacher has sexual relationships with students. There are rumors that a girl trades sex for grades.

Language

Strpng language includes "a--hole," "bitch," "slut," "s--t."

Consumerism

Some products mentioned in passing: DVF wrap dress, James jeans, Dragon Ball Z, Candy Crush, Bugles, Diet Sprite.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

One of the main characters drinks out of stolen flask. A girl wakes up with a hangover after drinking. Some characters have taken OxyContin. Some other teen characters drink alcohol at a Halloween party.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know The Good Girls is the second book in a series by Sara Shepard (Pretty Little Liars) is about a group of very different girls suspected of committing murder. There are, in fact, several murders and attempted murders in the book, though none is described in that much detail. Also, a boy beat up another kid after he raped a girl, a character is scarred after being beaten by her dad, and another girl is getting over her brother’s suicide. Characters kiss -- there's one steamy make out scene in a store's dressing room. A teacher has sexual relationships with students. There are rumors that a girl trades sex for grades. There's some strong language (including "a--hole," "bitch," "slut," "s--t"), some drinking and talk about the drug OxyCotin. The protagonists play a role in the murders, but there's a positive message here about "never saying anything" that you might live to regret. The novel may appeal to reluctant readers who like the fast pace and constant dramatic tension.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byKelly G. September 22, 2017

Shocking

It's filled with twists and turns it keeps you in wind.
Teen, 15 years old Written byboredwierdo11 October 3, 2015

School book review

Parents need to know That "Good Girls" by Sara Shepard is the second book in a series "The Perfectionists". The main conflict in the book is... Continue reading
Kid, 11 years old December 22, 2016

Great book!

I think this book is acceptable if you read The Perfectionists before. That will get you ready for this drama. Anyhow, i think this provides good messages for k... Continue reading

What's the story?

In THE GOOD GIRLS, nobody knows who killed popular Nolan or skeazy teacher Mr. Granger, but Julie, Parker, Mackenzie, and Caitlin remain under a cloud of suspicion. And they know something is not right, too: They were the ones who made a list of who they wanted dead one fateful day in Mr. Granger's class, and Nolan was on the list. They try to go about their lives in their well-to-do suburb -- Caitlin makes co-captain of her soccer team and Mackenzie meets a cute boy who also will be going to Juilliard next year -- but then more of the people they listed are turning up as victims. Is it possible one of them is actually responsible for these horrible crimes?

Is it any good?

Teens looking for a book drenched in drama will find plenty of fun in this sequel, including a conclusion that twists and then twists again. But there's a serious lack of reality here -- like the fact that these girls have just been accused of being murderers but yet are still striking up romances, playing sports, and talking to friends about a school test. It's hard to believe that their parents would ever let them out of the house again, or that they wouldn't be single-minded in their search for the real killer.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about sequels and reading a series. Did you read The Perfectionists? Do you think there will be more books coming in Shepard's series? What's fun about returning to the same cast of characters?

  • There's lots of killing in this book -- though none is described in too much detail. What is it about murder mysteries and other crime novels that appeals to readers?  

  • Do you think The Good Girls will be a successful TV show like Pretty Little Liars? What does a story need to translate well from the page to the screen?

Book details

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