Parent reviews for The Perks of Being a Wallflower

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Common Sense says

age 16+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 15+

Based on 10 reviews

Kids say

age 14+

Based on 132 reviews

age 16+

It's not a bad book

I think this is a good book, if you are mature enough for it. I had to read it for my advanced English class in 12th grade, and it wasn't too bad. It has strong language and content, and touches on some serious topics, but is actually relevant for teens and what they go through. Think about how much of these things take place in the real world, people smoke and drink and have sex . And you probably can't even go a day without hearing swear words (Especially in school). It portrays a realistic topic and story and deserves a read.
age 15+
Going into high school can be a scary experience for anyone, especially for a social outcast like Charlie. “Perks of Being a Wallflower” by Stephen Chbosky is the emotional story of Charlie's first year of high school. From new friends, drugs, suicide, and abuse this story is a revealing look into a teenage boys struggle to just fit in during his first year of high school. I highly recommend this book to those who are looking for a good read about relevant high school topics. Many of the themes that are prevalent in this book do make it more of a young adult novel and I would not suggest it for anyone under 15. There are multiple references to drugs, alcohol, abuse, and sex throughout the novel. Most of the conflicts that Charlie faces deal directly with these problems. The climax of the novel comes very late making the ending seem slightly rushed, but it was still a novel that I did not want to end. The writing style of this novel also really help to add to the realistic elements of this novel. The whole novel is letter written by Charlie to an unnamed recipient. Charlie’s thoughts are also very scattered while he is writing giving it a personal feel while also giving us an insight into Charlie’s character. In many instances he will be discussing one topic and quickly change to the next and get off track for the next three paragraphs and while this can becoming distracting at times it gives you a much better look and picture as to what Charlie is really like. Anyone who is facing difficulties in high school should definitely give this book a chance. It is a great resource of information on how to face those real life situations while still adding a bit of humor to the situation. And even if you are not facing struggles, you are just looking for a good, inspiring novel to read, I highly recommend “Perks of Being a Wallflower”.

This title has:

Great messages
age 15+

This title has:

Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Too much sex
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 17+

This title has:

Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 15+

mature themes (yes I know, all kids think they are mature)

Who are the "parents" or "adults" recommending this book for under 16?? Oh, I see... if you actually read the reviews they're kids, not adults. Now it makes sense. This book is excellent, but for 16 and up. Definitely older high school (10th grade and up). And don't let the movie fool you... WAY tamer than the book.

This title has:

Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 14+

Somewhat Enjoyable at Times, Highly Overrated

"Perks of Being a Wallflower" is not a very good read. The characters are intriguing at first glance, making them initially fun to read about, but they get bland very quickly. The main character Charlie is pretty clueless, and doesn't really understand how to behave. For instance, there's one scene where he tells a girl that he had a wet dream about her and then starts crying, which is creepy and not socially acceptable. He also didn't know what masturbation was at age fifteen. l'm fifteen now (my profile says 18 by mistake) and I've known about masturbation for years. This book doesn't really have a concrete plot, it's pretty much just a bunch of teenagers hanging out. There were a few good and interesting parts, but I felt like the author only wrote this book so he could write about controversial stuff. It's chock full of cheesy, pseudo-philosophical quotes, such as "At that moment, I swear we were infinite" (what does that even mean?) and "We accept the love we think we deserve." Several elements of the plot I thought were unrealistic. In my experience as a high school student, I have never come into contact with people who drink, smoke, or do drugs as much as many of the characters in this book. Also, the fact that Charlie, a freshman, immediately becomes really good friends with a group of seniors seems rather far fetched. Overall, I don't think this book is even close to being as good as everyone says. I would not give this book to anybody under the age of thirteen or fourteen because of the heavy themes in the book, and because it would give pre-high school age students an unrealistic view of high school.

This title has:

Great messages
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 18+

bh

Best Book Ever Language F--k A-----e h--l f-g Sex lots of visual nudity and talk Drug use lots of teen drinking, smoking, and partiying

This title has:

Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 15+

I've read and suggested this book many times

The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a classic coming-of-age story; written in a unique style and conveying memorable lessons. It's better and more meaningful each time you read it!

This title has:

Educational value
Great messages
age 12+

AMAZING!!!

This is one of the best books I've ever read. It taught me a lot of important things about life and has a lot of beautiful quotes, my favorite is "We accept the love we think we deserve."

This title has:

Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 13+

Good Read

This book identifies with teenagers because it is relevant to what kids face today! It does not compromise reader's judgment. It instead instills a sense of self, based on choice.