Twisted

Book review by
Matt Berman, Common Sense Media
Twisted Book Poster Image
Gritty but powerful read about bullied teen.
Parents recommendPopular with kids

Parents say

age 14+
Based on 14 reviews

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 35 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this book.

Educational Value

This book, written by a popular author and with a male protagonist, might appeal to a wide range of teens, both boys and girls. Parents can use this story to open up conversations about bullying. See our "Families Can Talk About" section for ideas. The publishers have also put out a reading guide with great discussion questions.

Positive Messages

This is both a book about high school bullying, and also a story of one teen boy's coming of age. Teens will empathize with Tyler's difficult life, and also cheer for him as he begins to grow into his own person.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The main character is caught spray-painting the school and arrested, but Tyler often does the right thing when it would be easier or more fun to do otherwise. Tyler has more than earned the sympathy of the reader long before he is pushed beyond what anyone should have to deal with. It's a terrific thing, and all too rare, to see a protagonist develop hard-won strength of character right before your eyes.  

Violence

Some fighting: Tyler is jumped by three other guys and beaten, and he considers suicide, going so far as to put a gun in his mouth. His friend is tied down, stripped, and tormented. Someone takes pictures of a drunk, passed-out girl and posts them on the Internet. 

Sex

References to erections, sexual fantasies, kissing, petting, intercourse. Little described, aside from kissing.

Language

Infrequent swearing: "s--t," "f--k," etc.

Consumerism

Snack food, cereal, electronics, and medication brands mentioned.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Teen and adult drinking and drunkenness, mentions of drugs, Tyler uses Nyquil and Ibuprofen to get to sleep.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that the main character must deal with school bullies. At one point, he considers suicide and puts a gun in his mouth. His friend is tied down, stripped, and tormented. Someone takes pictures of a drunk, passed-out girl and posts them on the Internet. Also, there are references to drinking, drugs, and sex, as well as some swearing and violence. Nothing is graphic, but it's there. There are some gritty details, but Tyler ultimately makes a powerful journey. It's a terrific thing, and all too rare, to see a protagonist develop hard-won strength of character right before your eyes.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bymoviemadness April 9, 2008

Iffy

This book is good for 14+. The sexual content, and the mature bits (alchoholic father, suicide, etc.) are a bit too much for anyone younger. It is well-writte... Continue reading
Adult Written byswimgirl2405 June 22, 2009

An amazing book

I've read plenty of Laurie Halse Anderson's books. Speak, Fever, Prom, Twisted, etc. And this is by far the best. This is the first time she did a boo... Continue reading
Teen, 17 years old Written byclyspe June 16, 2009

Thirteen??

The page before the title page: NOTE: THIS IS NOT A BOOK FOR CHILDREN. And she means that. One of the greatest aspects of Anderson's writing style is her u... Continue reading
Teen, 16 years old Written byjess_apple12 March 27, 2011
It kept me reading.And i really could see the bad side to party;s fromt his book.

What's the story?

After years of being an unnoticed dweeb, Tyler gets noticed in high school when he spray-paints graffiti on the school. He also gets arrested and sentenced to a summer of community service, from which he earns a newly muscular physique from the labor, and a reputation as slightly dangerous.

For a while things are OK for Tyler: he is no longer afraid of bullies, and the hottest girl in school (daughter of his father's boss and sister of the worst bully) seem interested in him. But his father is verbally abusive, his mother an alcoholic, all of the adults in his life are suspicious of him, and the bullies are looking for a chance for revenge. And when his life spirals out of his control, he begins to think that his only options are the most drastic ones.

Is it any good?

At first, you'll think you've seen this before; but then you start to notice some intriguing differences. The dweeb is buff and has a police record, some of the adults actually seem to care, the siblings like each other, the little sister has a good head on her shoulders, and the teenaged main character has become an adult before he or any of the other characters have noticed. And it's not much longer before you're completely swept up into a story with powerful emotional resonance, in which the protagonist may actually see a light at the end of the tunnel before the reader does.

Author Laurie Anderson does a good job with her first try at getting inside the head of a boy and speaking in his voice. Everything rings true here, and Tyler has more than earned the sympathy of the reader long before he is pushed beyond what anyone should have to deal with. It's a terrific thing, and all too rare, to see a protagonist develop hard-won strength of character right before your eyes.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how this book compares to the author's other work, like Speak and Wintergirls. This time, the author writes from a male perspective. Did you find that convincing?

  • In this book, Tyler has to deal with bullies. Does his experience seem realistic? At your school, what are some of the ways that kids get bullied? Do you think things have gotten harder for kids with the rise of cyberbullying? Parents who go down this path may want to consult our Cyberbullying Discussion Guide

Book details

For kids who love oddballs

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