Aliens vs. Predator

Game review by
Marc Saltzman, Common Sense Media
Aliens vs. Predator Game Poster Image
Halo-type sci-fi shooter, just with more gore and profanity.
Parents recommendPopular with kids

Parents say

age 14+
Based on 9 reviews

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 29 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

The game is rooted in violence, but at least it's science fiction-based and takes place in space and against alien creatures (unless you're playing as the Aliens or Predators, and then humans are the enemy). There is no moral or ethical "message" to the game as it's simply an unadulterated shoot-em-up.

Positive Role Models & Representations

There are three main protagonists in this game (Marine, Alien, and Predator) but none of them are good role models as they'll kill hundreds or even thousands of enemies in a solo campaign or multiplayer mode. We don't learn much about the Alien or Predator species, and even the human one is light on story.

Ease of Play

The game is fairly easy to pick up and play (on the Xbox 360 version that we tried), though some of the basic controls are covered at the start of the game.

 

Violence

Aliens vs. Predator is a graphic first-person shooter that lets users kill opponents in a handful of ways including guns, melee weapons, and sci-fi gadgets. Blood and body bits can be seen spraying out of enemies; it's possible to decapitate or dismember with blades and claws; and Aliens can even put an enemy's head into its mouth to crush it. Some of the violence is seen in cinematic cut-scene sequences and/or in slow motion for dramatic effect. In many cases, human and alien creatures scream out in pain.

Sex

While the game has no nudity, a bar scene shows a hologram of a girl who is pole dancing, moving suggestively and wearing next to nothing (G-string and bra).

 

Language

The game contains a lot of profanity and can be heard many times throughout each of the three single-player campaigns (especially the Marines). This includes the F- and S- words and variants of those (e.g. "holy s--t," "bulls--t," "for f--k sakes"), and so on.

 

 

Consumerism

The game is based on a movie brand, so the game itself is a piece of consumerism. But there are no in-game advertisements.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Alien vs. Predator has gratuitous violence against aliens and humans alike. It contains more graphic killing than other sci-fi shooters such as Halo, which is somewhat pale in comparison, violence-wise. The Aliens and Predators are encouraged to kill up close and personal with blades, jaws, and other melee weapons, which results in plenty of blood spurts, dismembered limbs, impalement, and decapitated heads. Like the movies, Alien babies can pop out of a human's chest. The game also has a lot of profanity.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 15 year old Written bywecanonlyhope February 28, 2013

AVP= Good spin off of THE AWESOME movie franchise

Hello families AVP is a great game with fun, fast paced combat the only problems with with it though is the blood and not so much the language GOOD thing that y... Continue reading
Adult Written byfuzzyleetlelammz November 13, 2010

huzzah!

another cool game based on another awesome sci-fi thriller! i love the part in the movie where the predetor slices the mans face on the ice! i cant belive that... Continue reading
Kid, 10 years old September 16, 2010
Ihave not played but ive seen gameplay and its amazing it looks extremely fun and when you flay as predator you can say mother f$#%er
Kid, 12 years old June 15, 2011

It's Not Game over Man!

Are we really discussing a game called ALIENS VS PREDATOR? Parents you remember the Horrific sci fi creature tearing each other apart as Shigoney Weaver and Arn... Continue reading

What's it about?

The UK team responsible for the original ALIENS VS. PREDATOR (\"AvP\") back in 1999 has remade the game from scratch for high-definition consoles and powerful PCs. This sci-fi-driven first-person shooter lets gamers play three separate single-player campaigns -- each one as a different species -- as well as partake in online multiplayer modes that pits Marines, Aliens, and Predators against one another in a bloody fight to the finish. Each side has its own weapons and fighting style: human Marines use the latest military firepower; the agile Aliens slash with their blade-like claws and vicious jaws; and the Predators (which look like monsters with dreadlocks) stealthily stalk from the shadows and use various gadgets, alien weaponry, and wrist blades to take down the enemy.

Is it any good?

Even though the "Aliens" and "Predator" brands (based on feature films) aren't a hot commodity these days, the game's three distinct races could've made for an exhilarating shooter/horror experience. But each of three solo campaigns prove to be uninspiring and repetitive. Many of the missions start out strong, giving gamers a good sense of purpose -- seek out colonists, defend the alien queen, or protect the pyramid and the secrets contained within them (depending on your species) -- but after a few battles it feels like a "been there, done that" game. The same goes for the lackluster multiplayer modes that tend to favor quantity over quality, though playing Deathmatch mode on the Refinery map had its moments. Overall, the audiance for Alien vs. Predator is the fans of the franchise. It might be best to wait for it to be in the bargain bin (which shouldn't be long). 

Online interaction: Aliens vs. Predator game offers a number of online multiplayer modes and players can also chat using a headset, if desired. As a result you might hear other players use profanity in a head-to-head game.

 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about whether an "R"-rated movie means the game must be "M"-rated. Is all the violence, gore, and blood part of the appeal with this franchise?

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  • What is the impact of playing violent video games?

Game details

For kids who love action games

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