Assassin's Creed: Rogue Remastered

Game review by
Chad Sapieha, Common Sense Media
Assassin's Creed: Rogue Remastered Game Poster Image
Historical action epic has violent combat, strong language.
Parents recommendPopular with kids

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 8 reviews

Kids say

age 12+
Based on 14 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

Thinking philosophically and weighing benefits of order and liberty are outweighed by violence, killing as valid solutions to ideological differences.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Cormac is a cocky rogue who wants to do good but is conflicted about how to do it. He's a trained killer, derives satisfaction from his work.

Ease of Play

Combat is challenging, requiring more skill than luck to counter attacks. Easier for series veterans. No difficulty settings.   

Violence

Swords, daggers, pistols, more used in extremely bloody, gory combat. Enemies are impaled, scream, collapse bleeding. Civilians can become victims. Forest animals are hunted, killed, skinned.

Sex
Language

"S--t," "f--k," infrequently.

Consumerism

Part of the prolific Assassin's Creed series. Has associated comics, merchandise, movie, games.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Assassin's Creed: Rogue Remastered is a third-person action game with realistic -- and extremely bloody -- 18th-century sword, firearm, and ship-to-ship combat. Users play a conflicted assassin who grows disillusioned with his order and switches sides to become a Templar, where he's enlisted to hunt his former allies. Violence includes vicious melee kills, with blades jabbed into or through bodies and heads. Victims scream and bleed. Dialogue includes infrequent but strong language, including the words "f--k" and "s--t." Civilians can accidentally be killed, and players can hunt wild animals, trading their pelts with merchants. The remastered version of Rogue adds additional content that was previously available for downloading, along with bonus items and improved graphics.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bysimontroll November 21, 2014

ac rogue

i think the ac series is fine for a 13 year old and up. because they can handle .it
Adult Written bySureshot November 30, 2014

Don't listen to common sense listen to your kids and parent reviews this game deserves a chance

This game is for kids who are at 10 and up because if you can play batman arkham city or origins this game is actually less intense then those in some ways.Assa... Continue reading
Teen, 15 years old Written bySamuel B. January 11, 2015

Twist on the other AC games, with more moral issues

I think that this AC game is about as good as the others. In the main story, the new protagonist joins the Templars and fights his old comrades. Families can di... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byEnglishPenguin October 10, 2015

Epic game filled with vast beautiful landscape.

For most parents the mature rating immediately raises a red flag. The M rated content is stated to be "Violence" "Blood" and "Strong La... Continue reading

What's it about?

ASSASSIN'S CREED: ROGUE REMASTERED introduces a new protagonist, Shay Cormac, to the franchise's complex pseudo-historical narrative. A young member of the Assassins (a group that has endured for centuries and is dedicated to the freedom of humankind), Cormac grows disenchanted with his order and defects to the Templars, a rival organization that believes in salvation through order and control. The story takes place during the mid-18th century in North America in locations up and down the Eastern seaboard and includes appearances by other prominent characters from the series who exist in that time frame. The remastered version adds 4K visuals and enhanced graphics, as well as new outfits, weapons, and items. It also adds new missions and bonus content through the Ubisoft Club.

Is it any good?

This historical action adventure has gotten a new bit of life thanks to its remastered play, which packs new content and visuals into a story that many gamers may have missed. Assassin's Creed: Rogue Remastered feels like a loving ode to Ubisoft's historical action franchise. Its story is set in a time period well-explored by other entries in the series, and the counter-based melee combat and parkour-style environment traversal are the same as in previous games. But the locations are beautifully rendered (and enhanced with its 4K graphics and updated visuals), and the action is sharply honed. Play involves a mix of exploration, combat, and quests that drive the complicated plot forward. Similar to its immediate predecessor, Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag, it includes navigation through ocean and rivers. 

The story -- which features guest appearances from some franchise favorites (including the charming brute pirate Adewale from Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag -- Freedom Cry) -- fills in some important gaps and finally lets players take on the role of a member of the Templars. This provides insight into what has otherwise been a largely opaque and perhaps even vilified fictional organization. Unfortunately, unlike some other Assassin's Creed games, there's no multiplayer option. The game pushes no boundaries and offers no headline-worthy innovations or alterations to the series' tried-and-true formula. The addition of features such as wave-generating icebergs are minor at best. But it delivers more of what has made this one of the most successful series in modern gaming. Could Assassin's Creed: Rogue Remastered change the opinion of long-time fans of the series by playing on the side of the villains? Who knows -- but it's great to see that Ubisoft decided to remaster and re-release this game, which flew under the radar for many gamers during the switch over to the current generation of consoles, so now they can make up their minds.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the impact of violence in games. Assassin's Creed: Rogue Remastered forces players to consider the backgrounds, motivations, and even the families of characters killed by the player, so how does that make you feel? Does it make you regret attacking or killing a character when you know his or her personal story?

  • Do you think this game portrays historical locations and personalities accurately? Did you have a hard time distinguishing fact from fiction?

Game details

Themes & Topics

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For kids who love history

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