Cabela's Adventure Camp Game Poster Image

Cabela's Adventure Camp

(i)

 

Collection of summer camp mini-games uses Kinect to move.

What parents need to know

Positive messages

Medals are awarded for the higher scores and there is a lot of leeway and help to achieve those scores. The game has some light tongue-in-cheek humor, but all of it is geared to make the player feel they are in a fun atmosphere. However, the game also encourages "griefing," which means that non-playing gamers should distract the player so that he will mess up.

Positive role models

Other characters may cheat to win, but how the player chooses to play the game will likely be the most positive role model in this title.

Ease of play

The main menu reacts very slowly and sometimes requires going through the motions numerous times before the sensor picks up your motions. Some events, like archery, require the motions to be very controlled to get the Kinect sensor to read reloading the bow. Other games (biking and skeet) are very responsive. You may have to run on the spot (in biking) to pedal faster and gain more speed, and both biking and kayaking feature jumping motions.

Violence & scariness

There is a former animated camper named Greg running about that tries to sabotage players, and the game uses the term "griefing" by players not actively playing. This essentially means that non-active players use their controller to create hazards at the last moment to disrupt players scoring. For example, during the biking events, the off-Kinect griefer can put hazards in the way to slow the bike or alter the path toward coins (which are collected and added in as bonus points) and/or the finish line. Griefing is not active when two players are competing side-by-side. This is minor hindrances and it can be frustrating for younger players; but others will find it silly fun. When target shooting, players will shoot cutouts of animals. There is a whack-a-mole style memory game.

Language
Not applicable
Consumerism

Cabela's Adventure Camp is, obviously, branded with the Cabela's logo throughout. The name placement is everywhere.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Cabela's Adventure Camp requires the Xbox 360 Kinect sensor to play. Players not actively participating can 'grief' a player that is participating by using a 360 controller while not within the Kinect viewing field. There are nine total sporting events, though two events (skeet and sporting clays) are essentially variations of the same game. The controls for each event are simple. Because this is a Kinect games, players are required to get up and use their bodies to control the game animations.

Kids say

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What's it about?

CABELA'S ADVENTURE CAMP is an attempt to capture some fun summer camp adventures and package it in a way that is competitive and yet accessible by the whole family. Players compete for the highest scores, and to be posted on the in-house and online leaderboards. There are nine total events, though two events (skeet and sporting clays) are essentially variations of the same game. In addition, six of the events (biking, kayaking, wave riding, archery, skeet, fishing) have several different versions to play, which means you play the same game but in different settings. While the overall control scheme is not as active as some other recent Kinect titles, it still can have players up and moving. Up to four players can compete in a competition, with two appearing simultaneously in games. Some games are straightforward body control games, while Hogwhacked is a whack-a-mole game in a memory sequence style, and Ice Breaker is a strike a pose game of rock, paper, scissors.

Is it any good?

QUALITY

Navigating the Cabela's Adventure Camp menu can be frustrating and slow, and that even roles over to a game like archery where the player has to drop the bow down, make an exaggerated motion to refit another arrow, and then bring it up to fire. On the positive side, the graphics are bright and appealing, and some of the games use the Kinect control quite well, leaving players less likely to fumble to play and more likely to enjoy themselves. This is a family-style game and the general ease of play helps that notion along.

Families can talk about...

Game details

Platforms:Nintendo Wii, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360
Price:$39.99
Available online?Not available online
Developer:Activision
Release date:November 2, 2011
Genre:Exergaming
ESRB rating:E for Mild violence

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Parent Written bychicas1370 April 7, 2013

Help me pls!

I have 2 boys, they like the game, but don't like playing as girls on the game....anyone know if you can play as a boy in this game?? If so how do i get that to happen?
What other families should know
Easy to play/use