Exteel

Game review by
Dwight Odelius, Common Sense Media
Exteel Game Poster Image
Go head-to-head in high-adrenaline robot combat.

Parents say

age 7+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 7+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

Player is pitted against other players in combat, but there are no moral themes, negative or positive, attached. Since helpful in-game items can be purchased instead of earned, the game creates an uneven playing field for those without economic resources.

Violence

Robot violence involving guns, rocket launchers, swords, with lots of explosions and "kills". No human violence.

Sex

None.

Language

Online interactions have potential for unwanted topics. Profanity filters can be circumvented.

Consumerism

Banner ads for other NCsoft products appear onscreen. Players must "buy" parts for their mech using earned in-game credits or purchasable NCsoft currency. This business model is known as a "velvet rope" because it entices kids to play for free, but then ropes them into making purchases.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

None.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this game is a basic player-versus-player combat game involving robots equipped with powerful weaponry. Players try to "kill" their opponent's robot, but no humans are shown to be harmed. Parents should also know that online interactions can be unpredictable, and profanity filters can be circumvented. This massively multiplayer online game uses the "velvet rope" business model of enticing kids to play for free, but then roping them into making purchases.

User Reviews

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  • Kids say

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Teen, 14 years old Written byCypruss11 December 28, 2009

good for most ages

love this game it is amazing good graphics too, if you are worried about real money stuff stop now here is something that might help there are ranks in the game... Continue reading

What's it about?

In EXTEEL, players control giant customizable robots, or Mechanaughts, in battle against other players' Mechanaughts. Mechanaughts are equipped with high-powered weaponry such as machine guns and rocket launchers to attack and score \"kills\" of opposing Mechanaughts.

Exteel is a multiplayer shooter played from the third person perspective. Exteel is played exclusively online, and its emphasis is on player-versus-player (PvP) combat. There are several PvP modes, including deathmatch, capture-the-flag, and territory control, and one cooperative mode in which players fight against AI-controlled robots.

Is it any good?

The basic Mechanaught can be customized by replacing its parts and weapons. Better, more experienced pilots have access to higher-level equipment that can be purchased with credits earned from winning battles. Players may also obtain equipment using NCcoin, virtual currency available through retailers or directly from NCsoft. Players who use NCcoin to enhance their Mechanaughts enjoy the convenience of not having to wait to accumulate credits.

Exteel's complex and multi-tiered combat arenas allow the player plenty of strategic combat options, but beyond this there isn't much depth to the game. There is no story, no quests, hardly any artificial intelligence, or any other game play in support of the story's premise. Exteel is exactly what it looks like: a fast-paced robot shoot-'em-up. Within those narrow parameters, Exteel can be really fun to play.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about robotics, and explore the current and future role of robotics in the military. Is Exteel pure fantasy, or is there a grain of truth in it? Families can also discuss the nature of online gaming, and use this as an opportunity to discuss online safety and etiquette. Do people behave differently online than they do in person?

Game details

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