Freedom Planet

Game review by
David Chapman, Common Sense Media
Freedom Planet Game Poster Image
Actioner feels like Sonic homage, but play falls short.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 11+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

Themes of friendship, helping those in need.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Lilac, Carol, Milla all positive heroines, with strong bonds of friendship, selfless natures. They're willing to dive in to help those in need, without any expectation of reward, recognition.

Ease of Play

Simple controls; easy to play.

Violence

Most violence is very cartoonish, not the least bit graphic. But one scene features a decapitation in opening sequence before title screen.

Sex
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Freedom Planet is a downloadable, single-player action-adventure game inspired by classic 16-bit platform games, particularly the Sonic the Hedgehog franchise. The game features anthropomorphic characters with an Asian influence, and the playable characters are all strong female role models, with positive messages of friendship, selflessness, and helping others. Freedom Planet is a straightforward platform game, easy for players of nearly all ages and skill levels to pick up and play. Although the bulk of the content, including the violence, is cartoonish and seemingly acceptable for younger players, there are moments that push the boundaries, including an opening scene that features the decapitation of a king.

User Reviews

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Teen, 14 years old Written byPokefan May 24, 2016

Do your kids a favor, and buy this game.

Alright, I first saw this game's review on Twitter. And I gotta say, the official review does everything well, except for one thing: Freedom Planet is not... Continue reading

What's it about?

FREEDOM PLANET began its life as a fan-made revival of the 16-bit era Sonic the Hedgehog games before being redesigned to be a new, original property. When an intergalactic tyrant crashes his ship on a new planet, he immediately sets out to steal the Kingdom Stone, a mythical relic that could repair his vessel and allow him to continue his reign of terror. When best friends Lilac and Carol (a purple dragon and a green wildcat) rescue another alien, a shelled duck named Torque, and learn what's happening, the duo set out to protect the Kingdom Stone and protect their planet from the invading forces. It's high-speed hijinks and old-school action as players help Lilac, Carol, and their friends race over obstacles and through robot armies in their attempt to restore a lasting peace.

Is it any good?

If it's true that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then there's a certain speedy blue hedgehog who's feeling quite flattered right about now with this action game. Freedom Planet certainly shares a lot with the original 16-bit Sonic the Hedgehog games. Anthropomorphic characters? Check. A super-fast main hero teamed up with a slower, stronger hero who can climb up some walls? Check, and double-check. The list goes on and on. In fact, squint your eyes just enough and you'd be forgiven for thinking you're playing a missing, gender-swapped, Sonic spin-off found in some hidden corner of the Sega archives. But open your eyes a bit and you start to see the frayed threads around the edges.

Freedom Planet is easy to pick up and play, just like the retro games it emulates. Run. Jump. Attack. All the moves are responsive and simple to execute. The stages all take advantage of the characters' abilities, whether it's Lilac bouncing off the walls like a pinball or Carol racing across the ceiling on her motorcycle. From a purely mechanical standpoint, the game is nearly flawless. The problem is you never feel attached to the characters or the story in any way. The dialogue and voice acting make a cheesy late-night B-movie sound like Shakespeare by comparison. And with so much of the Sonic DNA showing, but not the pedigree of being an actual Sonic title, the game ends up feeling less like an homage and more like a cheap knockoff. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about friendship. What are the qualities that make a good friend, and what makes friendship important?

  • Talk about role models in the media. What are some of the traits that define a positive role model?

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