Halo: The Master Chief Collection

Game review by
Marc Saltzman, Common Sense Media
Halo: The Master Chief Collection Game Poster Image
Parents recommendPopular with kids
Violent sci-fi "greatest hits" bundle loaded with features.

Parents say

age 11+
Based on 14 reviews

Kids say

age 11+
Based on 64 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

Self-sacrifice, duty, and responsibility tempered by player-caused havoc, destruction.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Master Chief saves fellow soldiers, often at great risk to himself, but he does so by killing ... a lot.

Ease of Play

Easy-to-learn controls.

Violence

Violence, blood, and gore. You'll kill thousands of aliens. Many scream, bleed, and fall to their deaths. You can slice an enemy's throat, stab him from behind, or blow him to pieces by grenade.

Sex
Language

"S--t," "damn," "ass," "bitch," "bastard," and "hell."

Consumerism

This extremely popular franchise offers other products, such as a video series, graphic novels, books, action figures, and more.

 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Halo: The Master Chief Collection includes the first four official games in the best-selling shooter series. You play as a human super-soldier who must kill thousands of aliens from a first-person perspective. The player uses both human and alien weapons; watch for copious blood and gore when attacking enemies and during some cut scenes, such as slicing throats, stabbing enemies in the back, and blowing creatures to pieces. Along with the intense violence, parents need to know there's plenty of profanity -- including "s--t," "damn," and "ass" -- as well as an unmoderated multiplayer mode.

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User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent Written bynuenjins December 3, 2019

2019 version is better than ever as a definitive library of Halo. More content and games like Halo Reach Remastered.

With the latest addition of Halo :Reach, the franchise is really building the hype up for the upcoming Halo Infinite on Next Gen XBox for Winter Holiday 2020. W... Continue reading
Parent of a 11 and 14-year-old Written byCooldad57 February 21, 2015

One of the best on Xbox One!

This amazing collection of amazing and beautiful games is not as bad for kids as you may think. Many parents might think that the Halo franchise is too violent... Continue reading
Kid, 11 years old May 25, 2020

Really fun and enjoyable game.

You shoot aliens, lots of different weapons, vehicles, I don't know what's not to like! When you kill the aliens, or your teammates on accident (or on... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byCsm is genuine trash February 15, 2020

18+ like bruuuuuhh

Csm is made up of biased boomers

What's it about?

An Xbox One exclusive, HALO: THE MASTER CHIEF COLLECTION is a greatest-hits bundle that features the previous best-selling games in the series, including the iconic Halo: Combat Evolved, Halo 2, Halo 3, and Halo 4 -- all remastered in 1080p HD resolution and running at a smooth 60 frames per second. The collection also has a ton of added multiplayer levels, a "playlist" maker (to choose the best parts of each game, such as the intro level of one or the finale of another), downloadable content, and other goodies. Also, the Halo: Nightfall live-action digital series is included, as is an invite code for the Halo 5: Guardians multiplayer beta.

Is it any good?

The remastered Halo games have never looked so good -- especially the older ones, which date back many years. Although the core play remains the same, the high-definition graphics, improved lighting, and faster, smoother frame rate will be the first thing gamers notice after booting up. As in previous remakes, such as 2011's Halo: Combat Evolved Anniversary, you can toggle between the new look and the old graphics. That said, the old games still don't hold a candle to today's, but developer 343 Industries did a great job. The sound effects and music have been redone, too, and they sound exceptional on Xbox One. Most importantly, the gameplay feels fresh and fun, whether you're playing against the artificial intelligence or tackling others online, using more than 100 multiplayer maps.

Be warned: You have to wait for a downloadable update to patch the collection, and it's more than 20 gigabytes. This is an unfortunate trend for many of today's Internet-connected consoles, and it's because of a "ship now and fix later" mentality. Matchmaking for multiplayer games will be another update, followed by Halo 4's cooperative "Spartan Ops" mode. If you can get past all this, Halo: The Master Chief Collection is a "must-have" disc or download.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about whether Halo: The Master Chief's sci-fi premise make its violence more acceptable. Does the killing of aliens make the violence more tolerable? What about the fact that humans kill other humans in multiplayer?

  • Talk about consumerism. Some companies seem to be repackaging older games in bundles, with updated visuals and some extras. Is this a tactic to sell more games, or is it a way to repay fans for their dedicated following of a franchise?

Game details

Themes & Topics

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