Harvest Moon: More Friends of Mineral Town

Game review by
Jeremy Gieske, Common Sense Media
Harvest Moon: More Friends of Mineral Town Game Poster Image
Female character puts a new face on farming sim.

Parents say

age 11+
Based on 4 reviews

Kids say

age 7+
Based on 9 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

Positive reinforcement of good work ethics. Characters build strong and loyal friendships and healthy relationships. Good female role model.

Violence & Scariness

At the beginning, players hit a character with a variety of farm implements. Other than that, there is virtually no violence in the game, although animals can die if neglected (and from natural causes).

Language
Consumerism

Part of the greater Harvest Moon franchise.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that there is virtually no objectionable content beyond players' ability to buy and consume alcohol and give it as gifts. Instead, there are positive messages about building both a strong work ethic and healthy relationships. The female main character is new for Harvest Moon games, and may serve as a good role model.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bychasity April 9, 2008

i loved this game

its about time that they put a girl as a lead in these games. my kids love the havest moon series
Adult Written byyellowdiamond15 August 13, 2010
very fun, but it can be a bit challangeing for little kids :) i have a blast playing all of the hm games!!!!!!!!!!!!
Kid, 11 years old April 9, 2008

cool

its cool......
Kid, 12 years old August 22, 2010

Perfect for Any True Gamer!

I am a fan of ALL harvest moon and I have beat just this game about 10 times. I have married all of the bachelors more than once so i really know about this gam... Continue reading

What's it about?

As in other Harvest Moon titles, kids playing HARVEST MOON: MORE FRIENDS OF MINERAL TOWN start with a run-down, abandoned farm and attempt to build it into a thriving family farm. A frazzled businesswoman, tired of the stress from her city job, sees an ad in the paper for a farm. After she buys it, she's surprised to find the farm far from being operational and even further from being profitable. A lot of hard work is going to be required to make this a successful venture.

There is a lot to be done, much of it every day. Fields need to be cleared, seeds planted, and crops watered, and all of the animals require feeding, brushing, and a friendly chat to keep them happy. There is also an entire town to explore, where players can talk to townspeople, buy things, give gifts -- and even woo a future husband. As the seasons progress, the tasks change, and inevitably players end up with even more animals, crops, and challenges.

Is it any good?

This is a tough game to play, and some players may tire of the repetitive tasks. At some point, watering every single plant in the field (with a watering can of all things) seems more like real work than real fun.

But the farming premise feels fresh, as does the focus on time and relationship management. Gameplay reinforces positive social behaviors like honesty, loyalty, and friendship. Finally, the game offers a challenge to even the most dedicated of role-playing gamers. With so much to do -- and so many different paths to take -- the game has a lot of replay potential.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what parts of the game they feel are fun, and why. For example, is it the building up of the farm, getting more advanced tools, or forming a relationship with townspeople? Also, ask your kids what they think about the female main character. Were they surprised? Why aren't there more games with female protagonists?

Game details

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