Hop: The Movie Game



The ammo is candy, but there's a whole lot of shooting.

What parents need to know

Positive messages

Hop shows that even a game about the Easter Bunny apparently requires guns and grenades.

Positive role models

The characters' determination to follow their dreams can be seen as a positive attribute.  However, the shooting of animals is not positive.

Ease of play

Steering your character with buttons, while simultaneously using the stylus to fire your weapon, can sometimes get tricky. But it's not too hard to pick up. The mini-games play very smoothly.

Violence & scariness

There's a lot of shooting in this game. The weapons are all cartoonish and candy-related, but there are a lot of them. You'll supposedly shoot gumballs and marshmallows, and throw chocolate grenades, but you do damage to your enemies and kill them (they disappear after lunging back from each of your attacks). Your enemies are mostly rabbits, chicks, or animated chocolate animals. Some weapons, like Easter Egg grenades, turn enemies into chocolate and they can then be eaten. Your "health" is represented by a chocolate person, and you'll see "bites" missing from him each time you get hurt.

Not applicable

The game is a tie-in to the movie, Hop, and follows the same story as the film.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Hop: The Movie Game features a great deal of cartoon violence -- much more than is found in movie upon which it's based. The weapons may be fantastical and shoot candy ammunition, but they still resemble weapons and are still called "guns" and "grenades." And they destroy your enemies. The mini-games that occur between shooting levels are non-violent for the most part. This game creates a mismatch for the targeted audience of the movie (age 5) since all the shooting that's in this game is inappropriate for that age. We have set the target age of the game up to age 8, and even then, the violence masked in candy sweetness is disturbing. Also unsettling is that your avatar's health is depicted as a chocolate candy man who has pieces bitten off when he sustains damage from the candy bullets --  and you watch as his head is bitten off, then a shoulder, arm, etc.

Parents say

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What's it about?

The plot to HOP: THE MOVIE GAME is the same as that of Hop, the film. E.B. is a rabbit next in line to be the Easter Bunny. He doesn't want to be the famous bunny, and runs away to live with the humans and pursue his dream of becoming a famous drummer. His father sends a squad of commando rabbits, the Pink Berets, to retrieve him. In the game, you play as E.B.'s human friend, Fred, fighting off Pink Beret bunnies and overzealous chicks and collecting jellybeans.

Is it any good?


Beyond a couple of fun mini-games, including bowling with a jawbreaker candy as your ball, egg catching, and an Easter egg hunt, Hop: The Movie Game mostly offers run-of-the-mill run-around-and-shoot action. The story is told in a stiff and broken-up manner that could make following the plot difficult for anyone who hasn't seen the movie. And the level designs are very unnatural, making the play experience feel like an un-video-game-like movie being forced into a video game. For instance, Fred might be running through a house, but there are maze-like platforms with bottomless pits under them. The game could have been much improved if the developers had stuck to the more playful, Easter-themed fare in the mini-games, and shied away from the standard shoot-em-up action format that seems inappropriate for the targeted age.

Families can talk about...

  • Families can talk about the violence in the game. Is there a difference between cartoony violence and more realistic violence in video games? Does it matter if the "ammunition" is candy, rather than bullets? What messages can this game send to children regarding guns and shooting?

  • Why do game developers make games with more violence than was in the original source material -- in this case, Hop, the movie?

Game details

Platforms:Nintendo DS, Nintendo DSi
Available online?Not available online
Developer:505 Games
Release date:March 29, 2011
ESRB rating:E for Cartoon Violence

This review of Hop: The Movie Game was written by

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Learning ratings

  • Best: Really engaging; great learning approach.
  • Very Good: Engaging; good learning approach.
  • Good: Pretty engaging; good learning approach.
  • Fair: Somewhat engaging; OK learning approach.
  • Not for Learning: Not recommended for learning.
  • Not for Kids: Not age-appropriate for kids; not recommended for learning.

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Kid, 12 years old April 25, 2011

perfect for kid 8-10

i love it though there is a lot if shooting.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Great role models
Kid, 11 years old April 20, 2011

Just as wonderful as the movie!!!

HOP is the best movie I have ever seen!!! The Game is just as awesome as the movie!!!
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models


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