LBX: Little Battlers eXperience

Game review by
David Chapman, Common Sense Media
LBX: Little Battlers eXperience Game Poster Image
Pocket-size bots pack a powerful, and personal, punch.

Parents say

age 6+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 7+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Educational Value

Kids can learn to think strategically and creatively as they collect LBX parts and use them to build unique robots. They will analyze the statistics of their own bots versus those of opponents, while using problem-solving skills to complete challenges and reach objectives. Kids also will learn to work together as a team to help overcome various obstacles and to defeat opponents. LBX will give players a fun story while challenging their problem solving and creativity in building their own personal robot warriors.

Positive Messages

Although battling opponents is main focus of gameplay, story focuses on teamwork, friendship, helping those in need, believing in yourself. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

There are obvious bad guys, but most characters presented as kind and supportive, if not a little competitive. Van, his friends, show strong traits of friendship, selflessness, compassion.

Ease of Play

Simple controls, but understanding intricacies in customizing, maintaining LBX robots could be overwhelming, especially for younger players.

Violence

Battles between LBX key to single, multiplayer. The story can be violent in spots. Lots of hand-to-hand combat, gunplay. Actual robot-on-robot violence lacks gore; in worst-case scenarios leaves players with broken robots.

Sex
Language
Consumerism

Game is part of a franchise, including an animated series, toys, various other merchandise.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that LBX: Little Battlers eXperience for the 3DS is the latest in a popular Japanese action-adventure multimedia franchise, the first to be released to North America alongside Nicktoons' localized version of the animated series. Fans of the series may find themselves interested in picking up or checking out other LBX-themed merchandise after playing this title. The game introduces players to a world where kids compete against one another with small, customizable remote-controlled robots called LBX. The robots use various melee and ranged weapons against each other, sometimes until one player's LBX is destroyed, but the toy-like nature of the robots keeps the violence from being graphic. Players should be aware that though the controls are simple, the customization and maintenance can be tricky, which could lead to some frustration. They should also be aware that though multiplayer is limited to local play, some players could still be exposed to offensive words in other player's nicknames.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bynduns September 1, 2015

I wasn't expecting this to be as good as it is

I have to say, this is very well-done, but it's also what I wish most anime-licensed games following the original story line would be like. When the story... Continue reading
Kid, 12 years old March 24, 2018

Good game.

Frankly, the game play of this game is the best I've ever seen. You can control a robot, move it around an arena, and battle with your friends. The control... Continue reading

What's it about?

Following the story line of the animated series airing on Nicktoons, LBX: LITTLE BATTLERS EXPERIENCE puts players in the role of Van Yamano and his friends as they take their skills with small customized robots called LBX beyond the Battle Box, working together to stop a global conspiracy and save the world. With more than 130 LBX sets and over 30,000 combinations, players also can create their own unique LBX robots to use in the single-player story or in local multiplayer action for up to six players.

Is it any good?

Proving that good things come in small packages, these robots are small in stature but big in fun. At first glance, LBX might look like it's geared more toward younger kids, but there's a considerable amount of depth for gamers of all ages. The story is surprisingly good, though the occasional dark turn (which includes things such as an attempted political assassination) might be a little much for young kids. As interesting as the story is, most kids likely will be more focused on the core gameplay of battling, collecting, and customizing their LBX. This is the bread and butter of LBX and what will keep gamers coming back for more. 

With so many parts to collect and so many ways to combine them, it's entirely possible to put together an LBX unlike anyone else. Even if two LBX look the same, what's under the hood could be completely different. Because of the work put into each bot, it's hard not to feel a special connection to your custom creations. And though a lot of micromanagement can go into actually building an LBX, it's done in such a way that it encourages experimentation without ever becoming an exercise in frustration and a player trying to get things "just right." Gamers of all ages may find themselves getting pleasantly lost in the LBX universe.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about learning to build new things in the game and in real life. Does something mean more when you build it yourself? Why?

  • How can the game's examples of teamwork and helping others be applied to daily life?

Game details

Themes & Topics

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