LeapFrog LeapTV: Blaze and the Monster Machines

Game review by
Christy Matte, Common Sense Media
LeapFrog LeapTV: Blaze and the Monster Machines Game Poster Image
Truck-themed racer focuses on physics for preschoolers.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Educational Value

Kids can learn to recognize numbers, as well as to correlate actual numbers with representations (for example, two dots represent the number two). They'll learn about physics concepts such as force and trajectory, which helps them start to think about how those work in the real world. In the stunt track mode, they'll explore virtual blocks such as platforms and ramps that will also help them consider how physics concepts come into play. They'll be able to assemble construction machines to learn how and why they're built the way they are. LeapFrog LeapTV: Blaze and the Monster Machines gives kids a fun way to explore math and physics with appealing, friendly characters.

Positive Messages

Focus on friends helping friends, working together, supporting one another.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Lead characters are kind. They support, encourage each other, the player. Blaze works hard to help Darington reassemble his stunt track.

Ease of Play

Directions are clear, controls are straightforward. Some younger kids may need help moving among LeapTV controller modes.

Violence & Scariness
Language
Consumerism

Based on an animated preschool TV show.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that LeapFrog LeapTV: Blaze and the Monster Machines is an educational game that focuses on math and physics. Kids will use all three controller modes on the LeapTV and will need to be comfortable switching back and forth among them. The multiplayer mode allows a friend or family member to join in on the track racing. The 15 levels will take kids a while to play through, but they include a lot of repetition of activities.

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What's it about?

LEAPFROG LEAPTV: BLAZE AND THE MONSTER MACHINES starts with an animated clip in which Crusher tries to steal the Super-Duper Stunt Track that Darington built. When the pieces end up scattered, Blaze races off to try to get to the pieces before Crusher gets them across 15 levels. Each level has a few games and activities, such as collecting golden tires (which give speed boosts) and avoiding obstacles. Sometimes kids will need to choose the lane with the correct answer to a math or science question such as "Which lane has the number 2 represented with dots?" or "Which lane has the object that requires the most force to break through?"

Is it any good?

This is a clever way to introduce preschoolers to some basic physics and number concepts while engaging them with some cool monster-truck characters. The story line is a simple one kids will recognize: Jealous character tries to ruin things for everyone else, but good guys fight back. The physics are accessible for young kids and presented in a way that kids will find appealing. Although the environment changes, the levels may start to feel repetitive. Most kids in the target age won't care, though, as they'll enjoy driving monster trucks around. As a bonus, they can learn a lot about the parts of different construction machines and how they work.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about ramps, platforms, force, trajectory, and other physics elements and concepts. Can you build your own track out of blocks, cardboard boxes, or whatever else you have available?

  • Talk about numbers. What things can you find with a number on them around your house?

Game details

Themes & Topics

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For kids who love math

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