Lego Dimensions

Game review by
David Chapman, Common Sense Media
Lego Dimensions Game Poster Image
Build an epic crossover story brick by (expensive) brick.

Parents say

age 8+
Based on 3 reviews

Kids say

age 8+
Based on 8 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Educational Value

Kids can learn about following directions and building by piecing together the physical Lego toys used within the game. This is an integral part of the Lego Dimensions experience, calling on kids to build, dismantle, and rebuild many of the characters' accessories. Kids also will develop their problem-solving skills by thinking through obstacles and puzzles. Kids will learn to use their creativity thanks to the regular use of the Lego toys, inspiring them to build not only what's needed but to continue to craft new ideas. Lego Dimensions bridges the gap between the physical and the digital by getting kids to build the tools they need to succeed in this adventure.

Positive Messages

Themes of friendship, teamwork abound; constant encouragement to use your creativity, ingenuity to figure out how to overcome obstacles.

Positive Role Models & Representations

All characters are genuine heroes.

Ease of Play

Simple controls; easy to learn, but also involves lots of building, rebuilding Lego play sets, many with small pieces that could get easily lost.

Violence

Lots of over-the-top cartoon violence, destruction, with both hand-to-hand, armed combat. Some characters, such as DC Comics' Joker, Mission Impossible's Ethan Hunt, use firearms as primary weapons. But defeated characters simply break apart into Lego bits.

Sex
Language

While no offensive language, some characters' humor falls a bit on the crude side, including manure jokes, occasional teasing of other characters.

Consumerism

Based on hugely popular Lego toys. Huge line of expansion packs/toys. All worlds in Lego Dimensions based on other properties, such as film, cartoons, games, each of which comes with its own set of related merchandise.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Lego Dimensions is an action-adventure game blending the popular toys line with multiple licensed properties, including DC Comics, Lord of the Rings, Jurassic Park, Adventure Time, the original Ghostbusters movie and its 2016 reboot, The A-Team, and more. Players fight their way through these worlds, beating up the bad guys and solving puzzles to progress through the story. While violence can be performed by firearms or hand-to-hand combat, enemies fall apart into Lego bricks when defeated. The game requires the use of certain physical Lego toys, which players build (and rebuild) and then transport into the game via the Lego Dimensions portal. Expect the possible loss of key parts because of the small nature of Lego pieces. While the main story can be completed with only the contents of the Starter Pack, the addition of Level, Team, and Fun Packs opens up the game and expands on the experience exponentially … though at an exponentially expanded price as well.

User Reviews

Parent Written byHenry H December 26, 2016

Purchased game for Christmas only to find we can't finish the beginning to enable gameplay.

After paying nearly $100 for the unit it's really not worth the money. Unit glitches on characters and will not pick up characters. If there was a way to... Continue reading
Adult Written byBob L. February 3, 2017

Lego Dimensions is Garbage...complete garbage

This was a Christmas present for my kids. We quickly discovered that the quality control on this system is garbage. When one of the Toy Tags was completely brok... Continue reading
Kid, 12 years old January 28, 2016

Fun

It is a pretty fun game in general.
Teen, 16 years old Written byAnonymousgamer13 March 26, 2016

Waste of your money

This is like all of the other Lego games except that you have to keep buying Lego figurines with real money characters at the store in order to get full enjoym... Continue reading

What's it about?

In LEGO DIMENSIONS, an evil mastermind known as Lord Vortech has been gathering his strength, plotting to take control of the legendary Foundational Elements somewhere deep in the center of the Lego reality. Opening portals to the different worlds, Lord Vortech has begun to seek out the elements and spread his villainy throughout the Lego multiverse. Standing in his way is a trio of unique heroes: the wizard Gandalf from the The Lord of the Rings, Wyldstyle from The Lego Movie, and DC Comics' Dark Knight himself, Batman. This epic superteam must jump from reality to reality, recruiting new allies to their cause and fighting back against Vortech's forces. With quick moves, clever ideas, and a little extra assist from players and their real-world Lego toys, our heroes must race to recover the Foundational Elements and protect all of reality from the sinister plans Lord Vortech has in store.

Is it any good?

Although it's pricey, the creativity, versatility, and depth of this game taps into the imagination of everyone young and old. Every kid, at some time or another, has mixed and matched their favorite toys in an epic, crossover adventure fueled by their wildest dreams. Lego Dimensions brings that same kind of adventure to life in a huge experience that engages the creativity and fantasy of kids of all ages. After all, where else can Batman and Wonder Woman team up with Shaggy and Scooby to help Marty McFly get Back to the Future? Or Jake the Dog and Beast Boy team with Newt Scamander to track down Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them? It's a wildly mixed-up world, but somehow all these diverse properties still manage to fit together as tightly as the Lego bricks they're made of. There's a little something for everyone here, young and old. It's a good thing, too. Since a big part of Lego Dimensions involves building and rebuilding the physical toys before using them in the virtual world, both parents and kids might need to work together to get the most out of the game.

Whether you've played any of the previous Lego games before or are a newcomer to the franchise, you'll be happy to know that the main gameplay is still easy to pick up and play. Each character has certain abilities to help progress through the story, and players can switch out on the fly to make sure they've got the right character for the right job. Unfortunately, this is where the game's biggest weakness also kicks in. The simple fact is that to unlock all the side missions and collectibles, it's going to take a fairly sizable investment. Purchasing additional Story, Level, Team, and Fun Packs can easily start to run hundreds of dollars. But unlike most other games in the "toys to life" genre (Skylanders, Disney Infinity, and so on), nothing you buy now will become obsolete later. Year 1 figures work with Year 2 content and vice versa, with WB Games planning to keep it this way. Regular updates to the base game keep everything compatible without forcing players to buy new versions of the same game. By expanding and evolving the original platform, even new features, like the brand-new four-player Battle Arenas, can be used with any Lego Dimensions character after they've been activated with a Year 2 character. Sure, Lego Dimensions is a potentially hefty investment, but thanks to WB's game plan, it's one you can definitely build on now and in the future.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about creativity and ingenuity. How can building and interacting with the physical toys in the game help inspire kids to build and create outside of the game?

  • Discuss budgeting and cost management. With so many toys available for the game, what factors into purchasing which packs? Should the focus be only on the characters kids enjoy or packs that add more overall content?

Game details

Themes & Topics

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