LittleBigPlanet 2: Move Pack

Game review by
Chad Sapieha, Common Sense Media
LittleBigPlanet 2: Move Pack Game Poster Image
Fun motion controls improve an already great creative game.

Parents say

age 6+
Based on 3 reviews

Kids say

age 2+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Educational Value

Kids can learn about video game design and digital creation in this game-building game. They'll discover the complex logic that lies behind games they play –- switches, triggers, artificial intelligence –- while designing visual elements that give their creations a unique look and feel. There's also potential for them to take part in a thriving community where they can communicate with and be inspired by other game makers. Kids who spend the hours necessary to master LittleBigPlanet 2's game-making mode will have a much clearer idea of what it takes to build a video game.

Positive Messages

This game promotes and fosters player creativity in its level creator mode. The brief story sees the player’s sackboy or sackgirl journeying to save a group of kidnapped sackbots from a nasty “Cakeling,” with a moral that suggests tenacity will always triumph over evil.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The player’s sack person does not speak. However, through the player’s actions it becomes clear that he or she is clearly a nice little cloth creature intent on doing good and helping friends.  

Ease of Play

The story levels, all of which require the PlayStation Move motion controller, are very easy and designed more to teach players how to play the game with a Move controller than to challenge. The movement-based controls are instantly intuitive and highly responsive. The mini-games are more challenging, but still quick and easy to understand.

Violence & Scariness

Players’ sackboys and sackgirls can get burned by fire, scorched by acid rain, and fall off cliffs. A mini-game sees non-player sackbots getting zapped by white electricity beams.

Language
Consumerism

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that LittleBigPlanet 2: Move Pack is a downloadable content package. It requires both a copy of LittleBigPlanet 2 and at least one PlayStation Move motion controller. Players do not attack enemies but instead simply attempt to navigate tricky environments. However, it does contain mild violence, including scenes in which the player’s cloth character is burned by fire and disappears in a puff of smoke. Like the game it is designed to augment, this add-on promotes and fosters creativity by providing new materials, music, costumes, and abilities for players to incorporate in games that they design themselves. Parents should note that LittleBigPlanet has a sprawling, moderated online community that is, by and large, pleasant to partake in. User-generated levels with offensive content pop up occasionally, but the community reports them and the game’s makers remove them as quickly as they can. Note that online play supports unmoderated voice and text communication, a feature that Common Sense Media does not recommend for pre-teens.

User Reviews

Parent of a 9 year old Written bypulsev2 January 18, 2013

LITTLE BIG PLANET 1 AND 2. Must own

Great game. As in part 1, Part 2 contains an EXTENSIVE array of building and engineering tools to make creations onscreen in creation mode. And a complete, fun... Continue reading
Adult Written bymsassman June 5, 2012

A greate game

i personally have both of the games 1 and 2. and i would like to point this out. this game is one of the best games for people who have creative minds. this gam... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written bysweetgamer_575 January 12, 2018

good game for anyone

i like this game and its a great game for everyone ! thhere is like no violence either

What's it about?

The largest of dozens of downloadable content packs available for LittleBigPlanet 2, LITTLEBIGPLANET 2: MOVE PACK offers players five new story levels that tell the tale of an evil creature known as the Cakeling. Angered at her existence as a thing perpetually on the verge of being eaten, she begins kidnapping peaceful sackbots and eventually attempts to turn them into a cake to show them what it’s like to be a foodstuff. Players will unlock a septet of mini-games as the story progresses, and earn scores of new stickers, materials, musical tracks, and abilities that they can put to use in the creator module when designing their own game levels. Chief among these is the Brain Crane, a headband that sacks people to allow them to telepathically move in-game objects. It requires that players employ a PlayStation Move controller, which is used to move, slide, spin, and select objects on screen in all of the Move Pack’s new levels and mini-games.

Is it any good?

British developer Media Molecule has come up with several brilliant ways to seamlessly incorporate PlayStation Move functionality within its popular LittleBigPlanet universe. The new story levels essentially act as a primer to teach players how the Move controller can be used to interact with game objects. You will slide walls up and down, ratchet levers back and forth, carry objects with you to use as shields against harsh elements, and put others in place to use as platforms to cross dangerous hazards. The mini-games make even more inventive use of the Move peripheral. One has players tilting and turning the controller to manipulate a ball-rolling maze, another lets players use the Move’s pointing function to select squares in an addictive little block puzzle game, and yet another involves moving energy nodes to block incoming balls in tower defense style.

One can easily work through all of the new content in a single night, but the pack’s $10 price tag is justified by the new design possibilities it enables within the game’s popular level editor. There are already thousands of user-generated levels designed explicitly for the Move controller. If you’re a LittleBigPlanet fan and own a PlayStation Move controller, this content pack is a must.    

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about creativity in games. How does creating your own game differ from, say, creating a drawing, or a musical composition? Do you feel pleased and satisfied after spending time to create a game? How might you apply what you learn designing game levels to the real world?

  • Families can also discuss online safety. What would you do if you found a user-generated level that you believed to be offensive? What would you do if you encountered someone online who was mean to you, or threatened you?

Game details

For kids who love being creative

Our editors recommend

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