Mario Party DS

Game review by
Chad Sapieha, Common Sense Media
Mario Party DS Game Poster Image
It's fun minigame madness with friends on the go.
Popular with kids

Parents say

age 5+
Based on 4 reviews

Kids say

age 6+
Based on 23 reviews

A lot or a little?

Parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive messages

Promotes competitive and cooperative interaction among up to four players.

Violence & scariness

Refreshingly free of combat. The most violent things in the game include a giant slab of stone with a mean-looking cartoon face that falls on top of characters in some mini-games, and a bomb that explodes, sending characters flying onto a platform where they appear slightly dazed.

Language
Consumerism

This is part of the Mario Party franchise, and is a first on the Nintendo DS.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this is a party game in which cartoonish Nintendo characters engage in a diverse selection of competitive and cooperative minigames. While there is a little cartoon violence that is silly and amuzing, all of the games are completely free of bad language, sexuality, or negative behavioral messages. Up to four players with their own DS units can play together using a single game card, giving it terrific handheld gaming value in families with several children or as a game to play with friends.

User Reviews

Adult Written byCSM Screen name... October 6, 2009

ndfhl

It's actually a great game. It's so awesome that I can't even use words to describe it. Don't rent it! BUY IT!
Adult Written bybasbel October 9, 2011

Cool

I think this is one of the best video games in the world. it is so much fun! i play it with my kids
Kid, 11 years old December 24, 2009

fun game

look at mly reveiw in the #8 and it's the same as this.
Kid, 9 years old May 24, 2009

WOW

In a good way. I've played this with my cousin Rose and had a blast when we were playing certain minigames and had a cow when we were playing Trace Cadets...

What's it about?

Spanning five platforms and nearly a dozen games, Nintendo's Mario Party is one of the company's most prolific and enduring franchises, and MARIO PARTY DS, the first in the series to be developed for the dual-screened handheld, is perhaps the best of the bunch. Characters run around large, interactive board game-style playing areas, stopping after each round of turns to take part in minigames that either pit all four players against one another or split competitors into two teams. Mario Party DS features a single-player story mode (in which you face off against computer-controlled opponents), a party mode that allows groups of players to set their own rules for single games, and several complementary modes that let you practice individual minigames, play a few fun puzzle games that don't appear anywhere else, and review unlocked rewards including character figurines and boss trophies.

Is it any good?

Mario Party feels as though it belongs on the DS. The second screen gives players a bird's eye view of the game board at all times so that they can keep track of the locations of other characters and important board features, including pitfalls, shops, and, of course, the coveted stars needed to win the game. And nothing has been lost in translation from console to handheld. The game still has the same engaging 3-D view of the action on the bottom screen, not to mention just as many game boards, play modes, and minigames as any of other Mario Party titles.

Plus, the touch screen allows for some interesting new minigame activities. Favorites include drawing circles with the stylus to twist a music box crank in an attempt to play the classic Super Mario Bros. theme at the proper tempo; blowing into the mic to control the speed at which a bomb fuse burns; tracing the mugs of famous Nintendo characters; and swiping the stylus back and forth across the screen as quickly as possible to shear slices off a cucumber. Simply put, Mario Party hasn't felt so satisfying or fresh since the original debuted on the Nintendo64 nearly a decade ago.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the game's plethora of minigames and game modes, discussing which might be each player's favorite. Do you prefer playing by yourself in the story mode, or with friends in party competition? Do you find collecting virtual items like character figures and boss trophies to be a satisfying reward for playing? If you've played other versions of the game (for Nintendo64, GameCube, Game Boy Advance, or the Wii), how do you think it compares?

Game details

  • Platforms: Nintendo DS
  • Price: $22.99
  • Available online? Not available online
  • Developer: Nintendo
  • Release date: November 21, 2007
  • Genre: Party
  • ESRB rating: E for Comic Mischief

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate